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This article and any supplementary material should be cited as follows: Jeyasurya J, Van der Loos HF, Hodgson A, Croft EA. Comparison of seat, waist, and.

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Presentation on theme: "This article and any supplementary material should be cited as follows: Jeyasurya J, Van der Loos HF, Hodgson A, Croft EA. Comparison of seat, waist, and."— Presentation transcript:

1 This article and any supplementary material should be cited as follows: Jeyasurya J, Van der Loos HF, Hodgson A, Croft EA. Comparison of seat, waist, and arm sit-to-stand assistance modalities in elderly population. J Rehabil Res Dev. 2013;50(6):XX–XX. Slideshow Project DOI: /JRRD JSP Comparison of seat, waist, and arm sit-to-stand assistance modalities in elderly population Jeswin Jeyasurya, MASc; H. F. Machiel Van der Loos, PhD; Antony Hodgson, PhD; Elizabeth A. Croft, PhD

2 This article and any supplementary material should be cited as follows: Jeyasurya J, Van der Loos HF, Hodgson A, Croft EA. Comparison of seat, waist, and arm sit-to-stand assistance modalities in elderly population. J Rehabil Res Dev. 2013;50(6):XX–XX. Slideshow Project DOI: /JRRD JSP Aim – Investigate mechanics of assisted sit-to-stand (STS) motion to better understand how load-sharing STS mechanisms may facilitate STS motions while still requiring activation of leg muscles. Relevance – STS motion is important for ambulatory adults’ independent function and daily activities. However, full dependence on mechanical STS assistance can lead to leg muscle atrophy.

3 This article and any supplementary material should be cited as follows: Jeyasurya J, Van der Loos HF, Hodgson A, Croft EA. Comparison of seat, waist, and arm sit-to-stand assistance modalities in elderly population. J Rehabil Res Dev. 2013;50(6):XX–XX. Slideshow Project DOI: /JRRD JSP Method Conducted experiments with 17 nondisabled older adults performing: – Unassisted STS rises. – Assisted STS rises with grab bar, arm, seat, and waist assistance. Evaluated: – Each mode of rise base on subject questionnaire. – Key biomechanical metrics relating to stability, knee effort reduction, and rise trajectory.

4 This article and any supplementary material should be cited as follows: Jeyasurya J, Van der Loos HF, Hodgson A, Croft EA. Comparison of seat, waist, and arm sit-to-stand assistance modalities in elderly population. J Rehabil Res Dev. 2013;50(6):XX–XX. Slideshow Project DOI: /JRRD JSP Results Seat and waist assistance provided: – Significant improvements in stability metrics. – Reductions in required knee torques over unassisted rises and bar assistance. Subjects preferred seat and bar assistance.

5 This article and any supplementary material should be cited as follows: Jeyasurya J, Van der Loos HF, Hodgson A, Croft EA. Comparison of seat, waist, and arm sit-to-stand assistance modalities in elderly population. J Rehabil Res Dev. 2013;50(6):XX–XX. Slideshow Project DOI: /JRRD JSP Conclusion Seat-assisted STS modality is favored for nonclinical applications. Further testing of this modality with clinical population is indicated.


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