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An Invitation to Health Chapter 1 An Invitation to Health for the Twenty-First Century Dr. Lana Zinger ©2004 Wadsworth Publishing Co.

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Presentation on theme: "An Invitation to Health Chapter 1 An Invitation to Health for the Twenty-First Century Dr. Lana Zinger ©2004 Wadsworth Publishing Co."— Presentation transcript:

1 An Invitation to Health Chapter 1 An Invitation to Health for the Twenty-First Century Dr. Lana Zinger ©2004 Wadsworth Publishing Co.

2 How Are You….Really? How do you feel about yourself and your life? How do you feel about yourself and your life? Are you eating well and exercising regularly? Are you eating well and exercising regularly? Do you have close family/friends ? Do you have close family/friends ? Do you smoke or use drugs? Do you smoke or use drugs? Do you get regular health check-ups? Do you get regular health check-ups? How are you going to make the most of your life? How are you going to make the most of your life? What do you hope to accomplish before you die? What do you hope to accomplish before you die?

3 Health and Wellness Health Being sound in body, mind, and spirit. Being sound in body, mind, and spirit. Not merely the absence of disease or infirmity, but a state of complete physical, mental, and social well-being. Not merely the absence of disease or infirmity, but a state of complete physical, mental, and social well-being. Wellness Purposeful, enjoyable living. A deliberate lifestyle choice characterized by personal responsibility and optimal enhancement of physical, mental, and spiritual health.

4 Iceberg Model of Wellness State of Health Lifestyle/Behavioral Level Cultural/Psychological/ Motivational Level Spiritual/Being/Meaning Realm The Tip of The Iceberg Above Water Below Water

5 The Seven Components of Health

6 The Components of Health Defined Physical Good physical fitness and confidence in one’s personal ability to take care of health problems. Psychologicl our feelings and our thoughts. Spiritual learn how to experience love, joy, peace, and fulfillment; and help themselves and others achieve their full potential. learn how to experience love, joy, peace, and fulfillment; and help themselves and others achieve their full potential. Social The ability to interact effectively with other people and the social environment, to develop satisfying interpersonal relationships, and to fulfill social roles. Intellectual Your ability to think and learn from life experience, your openness to ideas, and your capacity to question and evaluate information. Environment al The impact your world has on your well-being.

7 Wellness-Illness Continuum

8 Healthy People 2010 The prevention agenda for the nation. The prevention agenda for the nation. Every decade the federal government identifies the most significant preventable threats to health and creates leading indicators that assess the health of Americans. Every decade the federal government identifies the most significant preventable threats to health and creates leading indicators that assess the health of Americans. 1 st Goal: 1 st Goal: To help individuals of all ages increase life expectancy and improve their quality of life. To help individuals of all ages increase life expectancy and improve their quality of life. 2 nd Goal: 2 nd Goal: To eliminate health disparities among different segments of the population. To eliminate health disparities among different segments of the population.

9 National Health Objectives 2010

10 Diversity and Health Poverty remains a major barrier to quality health care for minorities. Poverty remains a major barrier to quality health care for minorities. Minority  Underserved Minority  Underserved Different racial and ethnic groups often face different health risks. Different racial and ethnic groups often face different health risks. Genetics vs. environment Genetics vs. environment Office of Research on Minority Health (ORMH) Office of Research on Minority Health (ORMH) Gender-specific medicine Gender-specific medicine

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12 Student Health The majority of college students are in the physical prime of life. The majority of college students are in the physical prime of life. The top killer of undergraduates is not disease but injury. The top killer of undergraduates is not disease but injury. Students are usually covered by parental or school health care programs. Students are usually covered by parental or school health care programs. Health Problems on Campus: Health Problems on Campus: Binge drinking, smoking, infectious diseases, lack of sleep, psychological stress, sexually transmitted diseases, crime, and piercing and tattoos. Binge drinking, smoking, infectious diseases, lack of sleep, psychological stress, sexually transmitted diseases, crime, and piercing and tattoos.

13 Health Risks Students Take

14 Types of Influences that Shape Behavior FactorsDescription Predisposing Factors such as knowledge, attitudes, beliefs, values, and perceptions. Enabling Factors such as skills, resources, accessible facilities, and physical and mental capacities. Reinforcing Factors such as praise from others, rewards, encouragement, recognition, and sense of achievement.

15 Stages of Change

16 Concepts Important in the Process of Change Self-efficacy Internal and External Locus of control Positive and Negative Reinforcements Social and cultural norms Self-Talk

17 Changing Bad Health Habits Moral model Moral model Enlightenment model Enlightenment model Behavioral model Behavioral model Medical model Medical model Compensatory model Compensatory model

18 Decisions, Decisions Set priorities. Set priorities. Inform yourself. Inform yourself. Consider all your options. Consider all your options. Tune in to your gut feelings. Tune in to your gut feelings. Consider a worst-case scenario. Consider a worst-case scenario.

19 The Power of Prevention Prevention saves not only money but also productivity, health, and lives. Prevention saves not only money but also productivity, health, and lives. 2 out of 3 deaths and 1 in 3 hospitalizations in the U.S. could be prevented by changes in: 2 out of 3 deaths and 1 in 3 hospitalizations in the U.S. could be prevented by changes in: Tobacco use, alcohol abuse, accidents, high blood pressure, obesity, and gaps in screening and primary health care. Tobacco use, alcohol abuse, accidents, high blood pressure, obesity, and gaps in screening and primary health care. Primary Prevention: Primary Prevention: Reduction of stressors, enhanced support, and consumer education. Reduction of stressors, enhanced support, and consumer education. Risk Prevention: Risk Prevention: Identification of people at risk and subsequent education and support so they can avoid potential problems. Identification of people at risk and subsequent education and support so they can avoid potential problems. Prevention vs. Protection Prevention vs. Protection

20 Health Promotion The process of enabling people to improve and increase control over their health. The process of enabling people to improve and increase control over their health. A science and an art devoted to helping people achieve a state of optimal health. A science and an art devoted to helping people achieve a state of optimal health. Health promotion programs: Health promotion programs: Focus on eating nutritious foods; exercising regularly; managing stress well; avoiding tobacco, excess alcohol, and drugs; forming fulfilling relationships with friends; living in a community with clean air; risk avoidance; risk reduction; and having purpose in life. Focus on eating nutritious foods; exercising regularly; managing stress well; avoiding tobacco, excess alcohol, and drugs; forming fulfilling relationships with friends; living in a community with clean air; risk avoidance; risk reduction; and having purpose in life.

21 Life Expectancy BEGINNING OF TWENTIETH CENTURY BEGINNING OF TWENTIETH CENTURY Life expectancy less than 50 years Life expectancy less than 50 years Communicable diseases leading causes of death Communicable diseases leading causes of death Children health concerns Children health concerns LIFE EXPECTANCY TODAY White Black Hispanic White Black Hispanic M F

22 Ten leading causes of death in US, 1900 and Tuberculosis Heart disease Pneumonia Cancer Diarrhea Stroke Heart disease Lung disease Liver disease Accidents Injuries Pneumonia/Influenza Stroke Diabetes Cancer Suicide Bronchitis Kidney disease Diphtheria Liver disease/Cirrhosis

23 The Top 10 Small Changes to Improve Your Health Now Use seat belts. Use seat belts. Eat an extra fruit or vegetable every day. Eat an extra fruit or vegetable every day. Get enough sleep. Get enough sleep. Take regular stress breaks. Take regular stress breaks. Lose a pound. Lose a pound. If you’re a woman, examine your breasts regularly. If you’re a woman, examine your breasts regularly. If you’re a man, examine your testicles regularly. If you’re a man, examine your testicles regularly. Get physical. Get physical. Drink more water. Drink more water. Do a good deed. Do a good deed.


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