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Contemporary Media REGULATION Critical Perspectives In Media Section B UNIT: G325.

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Presentation on theme: "Contemporary Media REGULATION Critical Perspectives In Media Section B UNIT: G325."— Presentation transcript:

1 Contemporary Media REGULATION Critical Perspectives In Media Section B UNIT: G325

2 Watch the following extract:  The media (the network that produces the show, the distributor)?  Jenny Jones?  The perpetrator?

3 Schmitz was found guilty of second degree murder in 1996 and sentenced to 25–50 years in prison. In 1999, the Amedure family (Victim) sued The Jenny Jones Show, Telepictures, and Warner Bros. for the ambush tactics and their negligent role that led to Amedure's death. In May, the jury awarded the Amedures $25 million. The jury found that the Jenny Jones Show was: Irresponsible Negligent Intentionally created an explosive situation without due concern for the possible consequences. Time Warner's defence attorney later claimed the verdict would cause a chilling effect on the industry.

4 Q1. Unit G325 Critical Perspectives In Media Section B What is REGULATION?

5 0 Regulation is a kind of control placed on organisations within thousands of different industries (Specifically in the UK). 0 Most regulators carry out their duties in order to protect or avoid/prevent harm from being done to the most vulnerable members of our society. 0 Organisations and industries maybe independent or government run/owned, and must abide by the law. TASK: As students, you will have experienced school inspections by OFSTED.  What was your experience of OFSTED?  Do you think it made any difference to the quality of your education at school?  Is it a good thing? If so why?  What other industries in our society are regulated? Why?

6 Why Does the MEDIA Need to be Regulated? Unit G325 Critical Perspectives In Media Section B Q2.

7 0 1) To ensure that the content of TV programmes or adverts is appropriate for the viewer. 0 2) To Ensure that powerful media companies do not abuse their power. 0 3) The media can be seen as very influential (Often for Children) which could be seen as dangerous. 0 4) Criminals often state that their actions are the fault of a film, music video or computer game – this is often tackled in court. 0 The regulation that exists today is a lot softer than the regulation of the past because the government wants the media to make efforts to be responsible in what they do and how they do it. However, following the phone hacking scandal of 2011/12, we expect future regulation to become stricter. In your exam, you need to focus on regulation of the UK Media. The UK media needs to be regulated for many different reasons:

8 What type of Regulation is: PRO-AC-TIVE & RE-AC-TIVE? Unit G325 Critical Perspectives In Media Section B Q3.

9 There are two types of regulation: Pro-ac-tive & Re-ac-tive 0 Pro-ac-tive regulation refers to organisations that are set up to pre- regulate the media before it becomes public access. 0 Re-ac-tive regulation refers to organisations that responded to regulatory situations that are already made public, and are highlighted through raised concerns.

10 Unit G325 Critical Perspectives In Media Section B Q4. Define: STATUTORY REGULATION & SELF-REGULATION

11 0 As well as proactive and reactive forms of regulation, there are two further types: 0 Statutory regulation means that the regulatory body has been set up by an act of parliament, because it is considered to be in the best interests of the public. 0 For example, school inspections carried out by Ofsted are a form of statutory regulation. 0 Ofcom are a statutory regulator, meaning that in order for it to be created in 2003, a long process had to take place where the Houses of Parliament discussed the regulation area and whether the regulators that existed in the 1990’s could continue to work effectively in the next years. Once this had been debated, a discussion paper is written, checked, and questions raised. After this, the document is amended, and debated more, then finally the Queen agrees the act, and it becomes law. 0 Self regulation means that an industry which doesn’t want the government to interfere with the way in which it operates, sets up a system where people from inside the industry regulate each other. 0 It is the process whereby an organization is asked to monitor its own adherence to legal, ethical, or safety standards, rather than have an outside, independent agency such as a governmental entity monitor and enforce those standards. 0 A criticism of self regulation is that there can be a lack of objectivity, as was the case with the PCC’s investigation of the phone hacking scandal which took place The general public only found out about how widespread phone hacking was during the Leveson Enquiry. Statutory - Regulation Self - Regulation

12 Who are the Regulation Bodies: OFCOM/PCC/ASA/ PEGI/BBFC? Unit G325 Critical Perspectives In Media Section B Q5.

13 Statutory Regulated – Reactive Regulation 0 OFCOM = Office Of Communication 0 Regulates all TV & Radio in the UK. 0 Biggest Regulator – Very Powerful – Receives £122m per year. 0 Have their own broadcasting code (‘The Code’) containing rules & principles. 0 Aim to protect the public discrimination, and from harmful or offensive material. 0 Monitor Product Placement. 0 Responds to any complaints made about broadcasting. ‘Organisations/Bodies’ NOT COMPANIES (They do not make a profit)

14 OFCOM receives complaints from X Factor viewers 0 This is Zoe Alexander. She Auditioned for Xfactor to discover her own identity. 0 Think carefully. Why do you feel OFCOM received Complaints about her audition? 0 What was wrong?

15 ANGRY X FACTOR REJECT FAILS WITH OFCOM COMPLAINT AGAINST SHOW 0 A Pink tribute act who lashed out after she failed to get through to the next round of the X Factor has lost her complaint against the show. 0 TV watchdog Ofcom said that judge Gary Barlow appeared to tell a member of the production team "we needed one of those" in untransmitted footage after Zoe Alexander's outburst. 0 The production team member, who had approached the judges to talk about what had happened, replied "we got one". 0 The TV regulator said that the "exchange suggested to Ofcom that it was possible that some of those involved with the production may have thought it was useful to the narrative and drama of the programme to have an incident of this nature.“ 0 But it rejected Miss Alexander's complaints about the way she was presented in the ITV show, adding: "In Ofcom's view the programme showed a slightly edited, but accurate, version of what happened."

16 1) To ensure that the content of TV programmes or adverts is appropriate for the viewer Guess which advert was: 1)Banned After Complaints 2)Shown after 9pm 3)Did Not Make it to TV?

17 Self-Regulation – Reactive Regulation ‘Organisations/Bodies’ NOT COMPANIES (They do not make a profit) 0 PCC= Press Complaints Commission 0 Regulates all Press in the UK. 0 Focuses on the editorial content of newspapers and magazines (+ Websites). 0 Also monitors the conduct of journalists and if so hold editors to account. 0 Strives to protect the rights of individuals, while preserving appropriate freedom of expression for the press. 0 Responds to any complaints made about the press.

18 2) To Ensure that powerful media companies do not abuse their power Why have I chose this image?

19 Self-Regulated – Reactive Regulation ‘Organisations/Bodies’ NOT COMPANIES (They do not make a profit) 0 ASA=Advertising Standards Authority 0 Regulates all advertising in the UK. 0 Not funded by the UK government and cannot interpret or enforce legislation. 0 Its role is to regulate advertisements, sales promotions and direct marketing. 0 Its ‘code of advertising practice’ ensures no one is likely to be mislead by inaccuracy, ambiguity, exaggeration, or omission. 0 Responds to any complaints made about advertising.

20 What is controversial?

21

22 Self-Regulated – Proactive Regulation ‘Organisations/Bodies’ NOT COMPANIES (They do not make a profit) 0 PEGI=Pan European Game Information 0 Regulates all video game content. 0 Established in 2003 – Became the only game regulator in 2012 taking over from the BBFC. 0 Set up by the Interactive Software Federation of Europe (ISFE) 0 PEGI has five age categories: All of which include a short content description (What can be expected) 0 PEGI online was set up in 2007 to protect internet uses when gaming online.

23 Self Regulation (Statutory Elements) - Proactive Regulation ‘Organisations/Bodies’ NOT COMPANIES (They do not make a profit) 0 BBFC = British Board of Film Classification 0 Regulates all classification and censoring of films released in the UK. 0 Has statutory requirements to regulate DVD’s, video’s, and some computer games. 0 Funded by the film industry. 0 Distributes age certificates and consumer advice on the age suitability of the film. 0 Also responds to any complaints made about films.

24 Round up Quiz The BIG 5 0 What is regulation? 0 Give me ONE reason for regulating the media 0 What is self regulation? 0 What is the different between a pro-active and re-active regulation body? 0 Is the BBFC a pro-active or re-active regulatory body?


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