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By: Kristin Harris Introduction Introduction --Object of the game The Two Rules Rule #1: Questioners ask Yes-or-No questions Rule #2: Answerer responds.

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Presentation on theme: "By: Kristin Harris Introduction Introduction --Object of the game The Two Rules Rule #1: Questioners ask Yes-or-No questions Rule #2: Answerer responds."— Presentation transcript:

1 By: Kristin Harris Introduction Introduction --Object of the game The Two Rules Rule #1: Questioners ask Yes-or-No questions Rule #2: Answerer responds with a Yes or a No --The two exceptions to Rule #2 "I don't know." "I can't answer.“ Lets Play

2 Twenty Questions is a game you can play at a party or to kill time on a road trip. It requires no board or pieces, nor paper or pencil. All it requires is at least two humans communicating. It can also be played online. 20 QUESTIONS IS A GAME IN WHICH ONE PERSON IN THE GROUP THINKS OF AN OBJECT OR SUBSTANCE AND THE OTHER PEOPLE ASK HIM YES-OR-NO QUESTIONS ABOUT IT U NTIL THEY DETERMINE WHAT IT IS. Part of the fun is in the sober cerebral exertion of trying to guess what the thing is in as few questions as possible, and part of the fun is that this game inherently lends itself to being silly. I n this document I'll explain the two simple rules of the game, then I'll ramble off into some thoughts about how to play it well if you want to. The silliness part is up to you. Personally, I detest silliness and think everyone who behaves silly should be taken out back and whomped once or twice with a warm walleye. Hereafter we'll refer to the questioner(s) as "Q," and we'll refer to the person giving the yes-or-no answer as "A." We'll refer to the thing A is thinking of as the TARGET that Q is trying to name. (This game is well suited to real-time play via modem. The only necessary ingredients are a reasonably experienced "host," at least one other player, and a reasonably quick interface. Typically the way it works is that the Qs, however many there are, shoot questions at the agreed-upon A, who answers them as quickly as possible. See the Appendix for additional information about playing online.)Appendix Introduction Homepage

3 The Two Rules Rule #1: Q may only ask questions that can be answered with a yes or a no. Rule #2: A may only respond with a yes or a no, whichever will be more helpful to A. Ideally, these two basic rules will sustain a complete and competitive game of 20 Questions, but the ideal is rarely achieved, especially when some of the players are novices. There is a learning curve (albeit a quick and easy one) to jump on and ride, and there are exceptional situations that, once recognized and categorized, can belearning curve responded to by convention. Also, you should feel free to alter or abolish these rules at will; as long as everyone understands and agrees to the new rules, they should be whatever you want them to be. Rule #2 above is a good one -- the official one, I suppose -- but it's impossible to follow all the time. Here are two exceptional acceptable answers that A (and Q) should keep in mind: --"I DON'T KNOW." Sometimes A simply will not know the answer, even though if he knew it he could answer yes or no. In such cases A may respond with "I don't know." As an example, consider that A has chosen the Rock of Gibraltar as the target and Q asks, "Is it closer to London than is Svalbard?" If A doesn't know then he should not merely guess, because Q might know, and if A guesses wrong he will certainly mislead Q, which is a more serious violation of Rule #2. So, A should say he doesn't know and let Q take it from there. Continue Homepage

4 --"I CAN'T ANSWER." Sometimes A will properly determine that he's unable to answer a particular question with a definitive yes or a no, even though he is not ignorant of any facts as in the example above. In such cases he may respond with the generic phrase "I can't answer." An example will clarify the intent of this guideline: If the target is hamster collars and the question is "Are they worn more by men than women?" then A simply cannot answer, because the question assumes a fact -- that men or women wear hamster collars -- that is false. When the Qs hear this answer they are advised to analyze the exact wording of the question. In this example it will likely lead them to realize that neither men nor women wear them, which is a big step forward. (Also note that if A had been a real stickler he may have legitimately answered No to that question, because, in fact, hamster collars are not, strictly speaking, worn more by men than women.) Here's a different reason for A to respond with "I can't answer." If the target is a golf ball and the question is "Is it bigger than a golf ball?" then A will almost certainly mislead Q whether he answers yes or he answers no, which is a more serious violation of Rule #2. Therefore he may simply state that he can't answer. It's then up to Q to figure out what that means. Homepage

5 Choose Your Question Homepage Introduction The Two Rules

6 Who commanded the British troops that were sent out to destroy all military stores in Concord on April 18, 1775 ? a.Lt. Col. FrancisLt. Col. Francis b.Lord CornwallisLord Cornwallis c.Maj. John PitcarinMaj. John Pitcarin d.John ParkerJohn Parker Question One

7 Question Two No British soldiers died at the Battle of Lexington. a.TrueTrue b.FalseFalse

8 Question Three What hill did the troops defend in the Battle of Bunker Hill? a.Prescott’s HillPrescott’s Hill b.Bunker HillBunker Hill c.Breed’s HillBreed’s Hill d.Dorchester HillDorchester Hill

9 Question Four Who replaced Thomas Gage as commander-in- chief of British troops in Boston after the Battle of Bunker Hill. a.John BurgoyneJohn Burgoyne b.William HoweWilliam Howe c.Henry ClintonHenry Clinton d.Horatio GatesHoratio Gates

10 Question Five What American General was mortally wounded at the battle of Quebec on December 31, a.Benedict ArnoldBenedict Arnold b.Ethan AllenEthan Allen c.Philip SchuyerPhilip Schuyer d.Richard MontgomeryRichard Montgomery

11 Question Six There was a battle of Cowpens? a.TrueTrue b.FalseFalse

12 Question Seven What year was the Treaty of Paris signed that ended the American Revolution War? a b c d

13 Question Eight Franklin D. Roosevelt, the "mind" behind the New Deal, won the presidential election in 1932 against which president? a.Woodrow WilsonWoodrow Wilson b.Herbert HooverHerbert Hoover c.Calvin CoolidgeCalvin Coolidge d.John Fitzgerald KennedyJohn Fitzgerald Kennedy

14 Question Nine Franklin D. Roosevelt belonged to the Democratic political party? a.TrueTrue b.FalseFalse

15 Question Ten The Wagner Act of 1935 gave more power to what? a.Rich businessmanRich businessman b.Trade unionsTrade unions c.Farm tenantsFarm tenants d.Black peopleBlack people

16 Question Eleven The CCC gave the young men working in its camps a wage of $2 per day. a.TrueTrue b.FalseFalse

17 Question Twelve What was the symbol of the NRA, the National Recovery Administration, which helped industries to flourish again? a. The Black robinThe Black robin b. The Blue swanThe Blue swan c. The Blue eagleThe Blue eagle d. The Black HawkThe Black Hawk

18 Question Thirteen This banker is famous for financing the United States Steel Corporation, the first billion dollar business. a.J.P. MorganJ.P. Morgan b.Samuel GompersSamuel Gompers c.Eugene DebsEugene Debs d.Mother JonesMother Jones

19 Question Fourteen Which union, known as the 'Wobblies' and led by William Haywood, called for socialist government? a.American Federation of LaborAmerican Federation of Labor b.American Railway UnionAmerican Railway Union c.Congress of Industrial OrganizationsCongress of Industrial Organizations d.Industrial workers of the WorldIndustrial workers of the World

20 Question Fifteen Which of these philosophies called for decreased government control of business? a.Social DarwinismSocial Darwinism b.SocialismSocialism c.CommunalismCommunalism d.ExistentialismExistentialism

21 Question Sixteen This term was coined for the rich industrialists who dominated American politics in The Gilded Age. a.MonopolistMonopolist b.The Gang of FourThe Gang of Four c.Robber BaronsRobber Barons d.The Big FiveThe Big Five

22 Question Seventeen Who wrote the pamphlet “Common Sense”? a.John HancockJohn Hancock b.Thomas PaineThomas Paine c.Richard Henry LeeRichard Henry Lee d.Benjamin FranklinBenjamin Franklin

23 Question Eighteen This railroad tycoon was famous for building towns for his workers which were highly regulated. Who was it? a.J.P. MorganJ.P. Morgan b.J.D. RockefellerJ.D. Rockefeller c.Andrew CarnegieAndrew Carnegie d.George PullmanGeorge Pullman

24 Question Nineteen Roosevelt, first of all, closed all the banks for a four-day holiday. He wanted to rescue the banks. a.TrueTrue b.FalseFalse

25 Question Twenty The New Deal program had three main aims, which were what? a.Relief, empowerment, economic boomRelief, empowerment, economic boom b.Relief, recovery, reformRelief, recovery, reform c.Power, protection, prohibitionPower, protection, prohibition d.Pauperisation, unemployment, crisisPauperisation, unemployment, crisis

26 Correct!

27 Sorry Wrong Answer

28 Correct! Question Page

29 Sorry Wrong Answer Question Page

30

31 Credits All teachers and students at non-profit schools can use, revise, or adapt this game at will at no cost on the condition that all prior designers are cited. Resources: Google.mht Yahoo.com

32 Copyright Copyright 2009 Kristin Harris Copyright 2009 Kristin Harris Permission to copy this game at no cost is granted to all teachers and students of non-profit schools. Permission to copy this game at no cost is granted to all teachers and students of non-profit schools. Permission is also granted to all teachers and students of non-profit schools to make revisions to this game for their own purposes, on the condition that this copyright page and the credits page remain part of the game. Teachers and students who adapt the game should add their names and affiliations to the credits page without deleting any names already there. Permission is also granted to all teachers and students of non-profit schools to make revisions to this game for their own purposes, on the condition that this copyright page and the credits page remain part of the game. Teachers and students who adapt the game should add their names and affiliations to the credits page without deleting any names already there.


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