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Venice, 30/11/2010 Energy audit Renewable Energy Sources and Rational Use of Energy Energy Labels.

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Presentation on theme: "Venice, 30/11/2010 Energy audit Renewable Energy Sources and Rational Use of Energy Energy Labels."— Presentation transcript:

1 Venice, 30/11/2010 Energy audit Renewable Energy Sources and Rational Use of Energy Energy Labels

2 2 Sustainable Consumption and Production (SCP) – Sustainable Industrial Policy (SIP) 8th European Forum on Eco- Innovation, Bilbao, Spain April 2010 Making Eco-Innovation happen in Small and Medium-Sized Enterprises Shailendra Mudgal BIO Intelligence Service (FRANCE)

3 3 Basic definitions  ‘Energy-related product’, (a ‘product’), means any good that has an impact on energy consumption during use which is placed on the market and/or put into service, and includes parts intended to be incorporated into energy- related products;  ‘Energy-using product’ or ‘EuP’ means a product which, once placed on the market and/or put into service, is dependent on energy input (electricity, fossil fuels and renewable energy sources);  ‘Life cycle’ means the consecutive and interlinked stages of a product from raw material use to final disposal;  ‘Environmental performance’ of a product means the results of the manufacturer’s management of the environmental aspects of the product, as reflected in its technical documentation file;  ‘Ecodesign’ means the integration of environmental aspects into product design with the aim of improving the environmental performance of the product throughout its whole life cycle.

4 Sustainable product – key instruments [Defra (2008) Progress Report on Sustainable Products and Materials, 8th European Forum on Eco- Innovation, Bilbao, Spain April 2010 Making Eco-Innovation happen in Small and Medium-Sized Enterprises Shailendra Mudgal BIO Intelligence Service (FRANCE)

5 Eco-design ‘Eco-design’ means the integration of environmental aspects into product design with the aim of improving the environmental performance of the [product] throughout its whole life cycle [Eco-design Directive] The majority of environmental and cost impacts of a product are determined during the design phase. Design phase Raw materials ProductionTransport End-of- life Use Design determines impacts throughout the life cycle of a product 8th European Forum on Eco-Innovation, Bilbao, Spain April 2010 Making Eco-Innovation happen in Small and Medium-Sized Enterprises Shailendra Mudgal BIO Intelligence Service (FRANCE)

6 What is EcoDesign Designing products as though the environment matters Minimising the direct and indirect environmental impacts at every possible opportunity Healthy blend of creative excellences, innovation and technical rigor

7 Elements of the EcoDesign approach Product Selection. General Product Analysis/ Streamlined LCA. EcoDesign Workshop. Selecting design strategies and directions and the development of the design brief. Detailed design/production/marketing.

8 Product Selection Choose a product which you have some ability to effect. to what extent is the market sensitive to the environmental impacts resulting from the production, use or disposal, of the current product? The product should not be trivial and need not be the “green range”. what additional resources and expertise will be needed to address these new issues of environmental quality (the available organisational capacity)? Project should to coincide with product design cycle.

9 Develop a General Product Analysis Product information. A broad description of the product, its function and key components; key design/production features. A brief outline of the history of the product. Manufacturers/sources of all components.

10 A list of all materials used in the product. A list of all production processes involved in fabricating the various components of the product. Data on the (functional) use of the product. Current patterns of disposal of the product at end of life. Develop a General Product Analysis

11 Market. Key attributes of the product—functional, aesthetic, quality, cost, etc. Current size of the market, including trends, past and future predictions. Develop a General Product Analysis

12 Nature of the market—customers, niches, competition. Other factors affecting market and product position— costs, regulations and standards, consumer interests. Any environmental issues identified within the market. Claims by competitors with regard to environmental quality of similar products (see next section). Develop a General Product Analysis

13 Competing products. History. Recent design or development trends—particularly any trends in environmental features. Identification (if relevant and possible) of the competing product (in the global market) with the best environmental profile. Develop a General Product Analysis

14 The company—resources and capabilities. Outline of the company—its history, size, facilities and resources. Any environmental policy of the company or any history of environmental action or concern. A list of all components of the product made by the company and arrangements with suppliers of any other components. A list of people able to be involved in ERD project, and their expertise.

15 Pressures or potential for change of product. Environmental issues. New materials. New technology. New customer demands or niches. Developments in related products. Develop a General Product Analysis

16 Eco-design Directive Former version: Directive 2005/32/EC of 6 July 2005 establishing a framework for the setting of eco-design requirements for energy-using products (EuP) Current version: Directive 2009/125/EC of 21 October 2009 establishing a framework for the setting of eco-design requirements for energy related products (ErP) 8th European Forum on Eco- Innovation, Bilbao, Spain April 2010 Making Eco-Innovation happen in Small and Medium-Sized Enterprises Shailendra Mudgal BIO Intelligence Service (FRANCE)

17 Eco-design Directive (2009/125/EC ) Common initiative from DG ENTR, DG ENER, DG ENV Framework Directive which sets eco-design requirements (or implementing measures/legislation) for Energy related Products. Objectives: To improve the overall environmental performance of these products using an eco-design approach To ensure that disparities among national regulations do not become obstacles to intra EU trade) To contribute to the security of energy supply and enhance the competitiveness of the EU economy To preserve the interests of industry, consumers and other stakeholders Compliance through CE marking, i.e. products not fulfilling requirements will not be able to carry the ‘CE’ label 8th European Forum on Eco-Innovation, Bilbao, Spain April 2010 Making Eco-Innovation happen in Small and Medium-Sized Enterprises Shailendra Mudgal BIO Intelligence Service (FRANCE)

18 Scope - products Framework Directive sets provisions for system allowing products to be placed on the market/or put into service and covers Energy related products (ErPs) - any good having an impact on energy consumption during use Subject to implementing measures (no immediate requirements on products)

19 The extended Ecodesign Directive 2009/125/EC Extension of scope is the only substantial amendment of recasted Directive Working plan will be amended to take account of new products Review by 2012 whether to extend scope to non-energy related products Labelling, Incentives and PP in Energy Labelling Directive

20 Eco-design process European Commission Eco-design Preparatory Study Stakeholder Consultation Consultation Forum Impact assessment Regulatory Committee Working Plan EU Parliament 5 Working Document Draft Implementing Measure Adoption Consultants 8th European Forum on Eco- Innovation, Bilbao, Spain April 2010 Making Eco-Innovation happen in Small and Medium-Sized Enterprises Shailendra Mudgal BIO Intelligence Service (FRANCE)

21 Implementing measures Could be proposed for product categories which: Represent a significant volume of products placed on the EU market (indicatively > units/year) Involve a significant environmental impact Present a significant potential for improvement Are to be based on Environmental assessments / relevant product characteristics and functionality Products and technologies available on the market should be taken as reference IM should preserve the interests of industry, consumers and other stakeholders, but do add an administrative and testing burden on SMEs 8th European Forum on Eco- Innovation, Bilbao, Spain April 2010 Making Eco-Innovation happen in Small and Medium-Sized Enterprises Shailendra Mudgal BIO Intelligence Service (FRANCE)

22 Adoption of implementing measures Product requirements introduced via Regulations Working plan identifying candidate products Preparatory studies identifying environmental aspects Proposed draft implementing measures or self regulation initiatives are first discussed with stakeholders in the Consultation Forum Impact assessment precedes measures Regulations adopted by the Commission assisted by a regulatory Committee with scrutiny Stakeholders participate throughout whole process

23 Implementing measures - Criteria Regulations proposed for products: significant sales volume in EU (indicatively ) with significant environmental impact and significant potential for improvement All environmental aspects and entire life cycle of the product considered (annex I) Significant environmental aspects addressed Other aspects (product performance, health&safety, impact on consumers, manufacturers’ competitiveness) are taken into account

24 24 Indicative list of product groups covered by the working plan  Air-conditioning and ventilation systems;  Electric and fossil-fuelled heating equipment;  Food-preparing equipment;  Industrial and laboratory furnaces and ovens;  Machine tools;  Network, data processing and data storing equipment;  Refrigerating and freezing equipment;  Sound and imaging equipment;  Transformers;  Water-using equipment.

25 Existing requirements for product energy labelling (as well as for the voluntary EU eco-label) will continue to exist alongside the provisions set out in the Ecodesign Directive. Energy labels are intended to provide consumers with energy and environmental information on which they can base a choice between products on the market. IMPORTANT NOTE!!

26 26 Marking and the EC declaration of conformity  Before a product covered by implementing measures is placed on the market and/or put into service, a CE marking shall be affixed and an EC declaration of conformity issued whereby the manufacturer or its authorised representative ensures and declares that the product complies with all relevant provisions of the applicable implementing measure.  The affixing of markings on a product which are likely to mislead users as to the meaning or form of the CE marking shall be prohibited.  Member States may require the information to be supplied in their official language(s) when the product reaches the end- user.

27 27 EC declaration of conformity The EC declaration of conformity must contain the following elements:  the name and address of the manufacturer or of its authorized representative;  a description of the model sufficient for its unambiguous identification;  where appropriate, the references of the harmonized standards applied;  where appropriate, the other technical standards and specifications used;  where appropriate, the reference to other Community legislation providing for the affixing of the CE mark that is applied;  the identification and signature of the person empowered to bind the manufacturer or its authorized representative.

28 28 The CE marking (also known as CE mark) is a mandatory conformance mark on many products placed on the single market in the European Economic Area (EEA). The CE marking certifies that a product has met EU consumer safety, health or environmental requirements. CE stands for conformité européenne, French for "European conformity". By affixing the CE marking to a product, the manufacturer – on his sole responsibility – declares that it meets EU safety, health and environmental requirements. CE marking

29 29 Existing in its present form since 1993, the CE marking is a key indicator of a product’s compliance with EU legislation and enables the free movement of products within the European market. By affixing the CE marking on a product, a manufacturer is declaring, on his sole responsibility, conformity with all of the legal requirements to achieve CE marking and therefore ensuring validity for that product to be sold throughout the European Economic Area (EEA). This also applies to products made in third countries which are sold in the EEA. However, not all products must bear the CE marking. Only those product categories subject to specific directives that provide for the CE marking are required to be CE marked. CE marked products are bought not only by professionals (e.g. medical devices, lifts, machinery and measuring equipment) but also by consumers (toys, PCs, mobile phones and light bulbs). Meaning

30 30 Characteristics of the CE marking  The CE marking has to be affixed by the manufacturer or his authorized representative in the European Community according to its legal format visibly, legibly and indelibly to the product  The size of the CE marking must be at least 5 mm, if enlarged its proportions have to be kept  If the appearance and workmanship of a product do not allow for the CE marking to be affixed on the product itself, the marking has to be affixed to its packaging or accompanying documents

31 Thank you!! Romano Selva Sogesca srl


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