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Quickwrite  Please write until the teachers ask you to stop about the cartoon you are handed. Try to analyze it as best you can.  Write your response.

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Presentation on theme: "Quickwrite  Please write until the teachers ask you to stop about the cartoon you are handed. Try to analyze it as best you can.  Write your response."— Presentation transcript:

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2 Quickwrite  Please write until the teachers ask you to stop about the cartoon you are handed. Try to analyze it as best you can.  Write your response on the BACK of the cartoon.

3 Point of View (POV)Point of View (POV)  What are the types of POV?  First Person – A dead giveaway is the use of the pronoun “I.”  Think about who is telling the story. Are they watching it happen or are they making the decisions?  Third Person Omniscient – A dead giveaway is the use of the pronouns “he,” “she,” “they,” etc.  The narrator knows everything that is happening, even if it is not happening to him/her. He/She will most likely know the significance of the story or events in the story. This is the most flexible POV and allows the widest scope.  Third Person Limited Omniscient – Like tpom, BUT this narrator only knows what ONE character feels, thinks, etc.  The narrator knows more about the character than the character knows about him/herself.  Third Person Objective (or Dramatic) – A dead giveaway for this POV is the use of extensive dialogue. This POV is similar to tpom and troml, but the narrator can only say what is happening – he/she cannot see into the minds of any other characters.  This POV is like you are watching a movie – you the watcher (reader) are allowed to make your OWN inferences; the narrator won’t make them for you.

4 POV HintsPOV Hints  Ask yourself these questions:  Who tells the story?  How much is this person allowed to know?  To what extent does the author look inside the characters and report their thoughts and feelings?

5 Why is knowing POV Important?  To know whether the events in the story are interpreted by the narrator or by one of the characters. If it is interpreted by one of the characters:  How does the character’s mind and personality affect his/her interpretations?  Is the character perceptive or imperceptive? (able to figure out what’s going on, or not?)  Is the character trustworthy?

6 POV Importance Cont’dPOV Importance Cont’d  Know whether the writer has chosen his POV for maximum revelation of his/her material or for another reason:  Has the author has chosen his/her POV mainly to conceal certain info until the end of the story, thus maintaining suspense?  Did the author deliberately mislead the reader by presenting events through an untrustworthy character for some reason? (like making a climax more exciting or allow the reader to have an “ah-ha” moment when the truth is finally revealed?

7 POV Importance Cont’dPOV Importance Cont’d  Know whether the author has used her/his selected POV fairly and consistently:  Do the person whose thoughts and feelings we are admitted have pertinent info that he/she does not reveal?  Is the POV consistent? Why isn’t it? Is there an artistic reason? (Like for a bigger BANG! at the end?)

8 SOAPSTone  Point of View  S – Speaker  O – Occasion  A – Audience  P – Purpose  S – Subject  Tone

9 Point of ViewPoint of View  Ask yourself these questions:  Who drew the cartoon?  (speaker, writer or artist)  How much is this person allowed to know?  First person, Third Person Omniscient, Third Person Limited, Third Person Objective  To what extent does the artist look inside the characters and report their thoughts and feelings?  Is the artist speaking FOR the characters? Think about the time period.

10 S - SpeakerS - Speaker Questions to ask yourself:  Who is the speaker/writer?  In a cartoon, you would ask, who drew this cartoon?  What details does he reveal?  Why is it important to know who the speaker is?  His profession, views, etc.

11 Occasion  How does your knowledge of the larger occasion and the smaller occasion affect how we view and analyze the text/cartoon? (This requires you to recall your background knowledge)  Is there a smaller occasion? Perhaps a smaller event that relates to this cartoon? Do you think that is what inspired the artist to draw it?  Is there a larger occasion? Perhaps a general feeling in the US that would lead the general public/people to agree or disagree with the artist?

12 Audience  Who is the audience? What are their characteristics?  Think about where the cartoon may have been published.  How is the audience related to you as the reader/viewer?  Does this relation compare/contrast to the American Dream? How/ How not?  Why is the cartoonist addressing (drawing for) this audience?

13 Purpose  What does the author hope to accomplish by his expression of his opinion? Is he trying to persuade the general public in one way or another?  How should the audience respond?  How does the cartoonist WANT the audience to respond?

14 Subject  What message is the cartoonist trying to portray?  In other words, what is he trying to say?  What are his main ideas/arguments/points?

15 Tone  What attitude does the cartoonist want us to have towards the Chinese? The Blacks? The Indians?  Think about if you were living during this time, or think about your ancestors – would this cartoon influence them to believe the cartoonist? Why/Why not?  How does the cartoonist’s attitude enhance the effectiveness of his drawing?  Think about what you are passionate about – are you more likely or less likely to be able to communicate your ideas and beliefs better or worse?

16 Acknowledgements  Duckart, Tracy. “Elements of Fiction: Point of View.” The Cache. Humboldt State University, 18 Aug Web. 7 Oct  Morse, Ogden. “SOAPSTone: a Strategy for Reading and Writing.” AP Central. College Board, Web. 7 Oct


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