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Passage A Think About ItThink About ItThink About ItThink About It Read About ItRead About ItRead About ItRead About It Talk About ItTalk About ItTalk.

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Presentation on theme: "Passage A Think About ItThink About ItThink About ItThink About It Read About ItRead About ItRead About ItRead About It Talk About ItTalk About ItTalk."— Presentation transcript:

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2 Passage A Think About ItThink About ItThink About ItThink About It Read About ItRead About ItRead About ItRead About It Talk About ItTalk About ItTalk About ItTalk About It Write About ItWrite About ItWrite About ItWrite About It

3 1.In what way do you usually learn English vocabulary? Do you often ask the native speakers to explain English words for you? Reference: Open.

4 2.How do you understand the German proverb “Whoever cares to learn will always find a teacher”? Anyone who is willing to learn will make use of every chance to learn something from others. Reference:

5 3.Do you think to teach is also to learn? Why? Yes, because when we are asked to teach what we are supposed to know, it often turns out not as obvious as we thought to be. Reference:

6 Read About It Language PointsLanguage PointsLanguage PointsLanguage Points Content AwarenessContent AwarenessContent AwarenessContent Awareness Language FocusLanguage FocusLanguage FocusLanguage Focus

7 Several weeks ago I was riding in a cab when the driver’s eyes caught mine in the rear view mirror and he said, “Excuse me, Miss? Can you help me?”rear As any hard-bitten city dweller knows, the correct answer to a question like “Can you help me?” should always be some version of “It depends.” I chirped, “Sure.” “Thank you,” he said. He passed a slip of yellow paper into the back seat. Tongue-tied I stared at the paper, wondering. Was this a joke? A threat? Hand- printed on the paper in tiny block letters was this: proverb peculiar idiomatic

8 “Please,” he said. “What is the meaning of these words?” I stared at the words in the distressed way you might stare at party guests whose faces you’ve seen somewhere before but whose names have escaped your mind. Proverb? Peculiar? Idiomatic? How on earth should I know? It’s one thing to use a word, it’s another to explain it. I resorted to shifting the topic.resorted “Where did you get these words?” The driver explained that he was Pakistani. He listened to the radio as he drove and often jotted down unfamiliar, fascinating words whose meanings and spellings he then sought from his passengers.jotted “Peculiar,” he said. “What does this mean?” I could manage that one. “Strange,” I said. “Odd. Often with a hint of something suspicious.”hint “Thank you, Miss. And idiomatic?”

9 I cleared my throat. “Um, it’s a, well, um. It involves a peculiar use of the language.” I thought my use of peculiar was kind of clever. He looked confused, a reminder that clever’s not clever if it doesn’t communicate. confused “Uh, let’s see. ‘Idiomatic’ is related to the word ‘idiom’. An idiom’s something that’s used in, say, a particular part of the country or by a particular group of people. People who aren’t part of that group aren’t likely to use it and might not understand it.” Watching his puzzled look, I did what a person often does when at a loss for the right words: I went on talking, as if a thousand vague words would add up to one accurate definition.puzzledvague “Can you give me an example?” I racked my brains. “Gapers block,” I said. A peculiarly Chicago phrase.racked

10 But did it really qualify as idiomatic? I had no idea because the longer I thought about idioms the less sure I was what they were.qualify “And proverb?” I should have told the poor man right then that I might be misleading him down the proverbial path, whatever that really means, but instead I said, “I think a proverb is kind of like an aphorism. But not quite.” misleading “A what?” “Never mind. A proverb is a condensed saying that teaches you a lesson.” “An example?” The meter clicked off a full 20 cents while I searched madly through my mind. “Haste makes waste?” I finally whimpered.

11 But was that a proverb? Wait. Weren’t proverbs actually stories, not just phrases? While I was convincing myself they were, he said, “Can an idiom be a proverb?” I could answer that. Just not right now, now when it mattered, now when the fate of a curious, intelligent immigrant hung on the answers he assumed would fall from a native speaker’s tongue as naturally as leaves from an October tree. So I retreated.assumedretreated “Do most of your passengers give you answers when you ask for definitions?” “Oh, yes, Miss. Very interesting definitions.”

12 Until that moment, I’d been so inspired by the driver’s determination to learn English, so enthralled by the chance to indulge my curiosity about words with another curious soul, that I didn’t fully grasp the potential for linguistic fraud committed in this man’s cab. Now I could barely allow myself to imagine what kind of deformed English he was being fed by cowards like me who couldn’t simply say, “I don’t really know my own language.”enthralledindulgefraudcommitted I can only trust that someone as curious as he is also owns a dictionary. And that he figures out that, no matter what his passengers may say, haste doesn’t always make waste at the gapers block.haste

13 rear a. — of, at or located in the back Examples The thief broke into the house through the rear window.The thief broke into the house through the rear window. She doesn’t like sitting in the rear seat.She doesn’t like sitting in the rear seat. Translate The rear wheels of his car are flat. Key他车子的后轮没气儿了。

14 peculiar a. — unusual and strange, sometimes in an unpleasant way Examples What a peculiar smell!What a peculiar smell! She has the most peculiar ideas.She has the most peculiar ideas. Translate The fish has a peculiar taste. Do you think it's all right? Key 这鱼有一种怪味道。你看有问题没有 ?

15 resort n. — 1)a strategy or course of action that may be adopted to resolve a difficult situation. Example He took back the house, without resort to legal action.He took back the house, without resort to legal action. Translate我很遗憾你竟用欺骗手段。 Key I'm sorry you have resorted to deception. More to learn More to learn

16 resort n. — 2)a place that is a popular destination for holidays or recreation Example In recent years this place has grown into a fashionable ski resort.In recent years this place has grown into a fashionable ski resort. More to learn More to learn

17 resort to — to use, adopt, a particular means to achieve one’s ends Examples Terrorists resorted to bombing city centers as a means of achieving their political aims.Terrorists resorted to bombing city centers as a means of achieving their political aims. We are prepared to resort to force if negotiation failed.We are prepared to resort to force if negotiation failed. Translate他没作弊就考及格了。 Key He passed without resort to cheating. He passed without resort to cheating.

18 jot v. — to make a quick short note Examples Could you jot (down) your address and phone number in my address book?Could you jot (down) your address and phone number in my address book? Professor Smith advised that we always carry a pen and a notebook with us for jotting (down) our ideas.Professor Smith advised that we always carry a pen and a notebook with us for jotting (down) our ideas.

19 hint n. — a slight indication of a fact, wish, etc. Examples Didn’t she even give you a hint where she was going?Didn’t she even give you a hint where she was going? The lady coughed politely as the man lit his cigarette, but he didn’t take the hint.The lady coughed politely as the man lit his cigarette, but he didn’t take the hint. Fill in the blank The politician tried to ______ ( 避免任何丑闻的迹象)。 Key avoid any hint of scandal

20 confuse v. —to mix up (someone ’ s mind or ideas), or to make (something) difficult to understand Examples I was so confused in today’s history lesson ― I didn’t understand a thing!I was so confused in today’s history lesson ― I didn’t understand a thing! You’re confusing the little boy! Tell him slowly and one thing at a time.You’re confusing the little boy! Tell him slowly and one thing at a time. More to learn More to learn

21 confuse with — to mix things up mentally Example You’re confusing me with my sister ― it was her who was sick last week.You’re confusing me with my sister ― it was her who was sick last week. Translate Don’t confuse facts with ideas. Key 别把事实和观点弄混淆了。 别把事实和观点弄混淆了。

22 puzzle v. —to cause (someone) to feel confused and slightly worried because they cannot understand something Examples We’re still puzzled about how the accident could have happened.We’re still puzzled about how the accident could have happened. The students sat with puzzled looks on their faces as their lecturer tried to explain the theory.The students sat with puzzled looks on their faces as their lecturer tried to explain the theory.

23 vague a. — 1)not clearly described or expressed Example The patient complained of vague pains and backache.The patient complained of vague pains and backache. More to learn More to learn

24 vague a. — 2)not clear in shape, or not clearly seen Example Through the mist I could just make out a vague figure.Through the mist I could just make out a vague figure. More to learn More to learn

25 vague a. — 3)(of a person) not able to think clearly, or, not expressing one’s opinions clearly Example My aunt is incredibly vague ― she can never remember where she’s left things.My aunt is incredibly vague ― she can never remember where she’s left things.

26 rack v. — to cause physical or mental pain or trouble to Example Even at the end, when cancer racked his body, he was calm and cheerful.Even at the end, when cancer racked his body, he was calm and cheerful. More to learn More to learn

27 rack one’s rain — to think very hard Example I’ve racked my brains all day but I still can’t work out a plan.I’ve racked my brains all day but I still can’t work out a plan. Translate The boy had to _____ ( 绞尽脑汁 ) to solve that complicated problem. Key rack his brains

28 qualify v. — to (cause to) reach a necessary standard Examples Chris has just qualified as a doctor.Chris has just qualified as a doctor. Ann’s disappointed that she hasn’t qualified for the next round in the tennis competition.Ann’s disappointed that she hasn’t qualified for the next round in the tennis competition. More to learn More to learn

29 qualification n. — 1)an official record that a person has achieved the necessary standard of knowledge or skill in a subject, usually after studying or training and passing an exam Example You’ll never get this job if you don’t have any qualifications in science.You’ll never get this job if you don’t have any qualifications in science. More to learn More to learn

30 qualification n. — 2)an ability, characteristic or experience that makes you suitable for a particular job or activity Example Some nursing experience is a necessary qualification for this job.Some nursing experience is a necessary qualification for this job.

31 mislead v. — to lead in a wrong way Examples The wrong record of the patient misled the doctors in their probe for the cause of his disease.The wrong record of the patient misled the doctors in their probe for the cause of his disease. Advertisements may mislead consumers into buying things that they don’t need.Advertisements may mislead consumers into buying things that they don’t need. Translate Don’t let his friendly manner ____ ( 使你误信了他 ). Key mislead you into trusting him

32 assume v. — suppose to be the case, without proof Examples Do you assume that such information has significant effects on stock market?Do you assume that such information has significant effects on stock market? We can’t assume the suspects to be guilty simply because they’ve decided to remain silent.We can’t assume the suspects to be guilty simply because they’ve decided to remain silent. More to learn More to learn

33 assumption n. — a thing that is accepted as true or as certain to happen without proof Example On the assumption that oil price would go up, some gasoline stations started to increase their stock.On the assumption that oil price would go up, some gasoline stations started to increase their stock. Cf.conclusion A reasonable conclusion could be drawn based on some valid assumptions.

34 retreat v. — to move back Examples Attacks by enemy aircraft forced the tanks to retreat from the city.Attacks by enemy aircraft forced the tanks to retreat from the city. The writer retreated to a place in the mountains to put his thoughts on paper.The writer retreated to a place in the mountains to put his thoughts on paper.

35 enthrall v. — to hold the complete attention and interest of someone as if by magic Examples The World Cup completely enthralled people all over the world.The World Cup completely enthralled people all over the world. The audience was enthralled for two hours by a sparkling dramatic performance.The audience was enthralled for two hours by a sparkling dramatic performance.

36 indulge v. —to allow (a person, oneself) to satisfy his or one’s desires Examples Occasionally the busy scientist would indulge his passion for fishing.Occasionally the busy scientist would indulge his passion for fishing. His wife indulged him with breakfast in bed.His wife indulged him with breakfast in bed. Translate Mother indulges her children too much. Key妈妈对她的孩子太放任了。 More to learn More to learn

37 indulge in — allow oneself the pleasure of Example She occasionally indulges in the luxury of a good chocolate bar.She occasionally indulges in the luxury of a good chocolate bar. Translate the underlined part The young man indulged himself in eating and drinking, and soon found that he was bankrupt. Key纵情吃喝

38 fraud n. — a person or thing that is not what is claimed to be Examples John told everyone he was a well-known musician, but we know he was only a fraud.John told everyone he was a well-known musician, but we know he was only a fraud. The picture, which was claimed to be a real Picasso, turned out to be a fraud.The picture, which was claimed to be a real Picasso, turned out to be a fraud.

39 commit v. — to do (something illegal or considered wrong) Examples Strict measures will be taken in the public places to give criminals less opportunity to commit the crime.Strict measures will be taken in the public places to give criminals less opportunity to commit the crime. Police officers arrested a 22-year-old mechanic on suspicion of committing an attempted murder on Oct. 22.Police officers arrested a 22-year-old mechanic on suspicion of committing an attempted murder on Oct. 22.

40 haste n. — (too much) speed Examples Unfortunately the report was prepared in haste and contained several inaccuracies.Unfortunately the report was prepared in haste and contained several inaccuracies. Marry in haste, repent at leisure.Marry in haste, repent at leisure. Cf. Haste makes waste. — When we do things too quickly we are likely to end up with poor, useless and sometimes costly results.


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