Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

COSMETIC ADVERTISING The misleading images that are produced and represented in mass media for our consumption B Y S ASHA R AWANA.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "COSMETIC ADVERTISING The misleading images that are produced and represented in mass media for our consumption B Y S ASHA R AWANA."— Presentation transcript:

1 COSMETIC ADVERTISING The misleading images that are produced and represented in mass media for our consumption B Y S ASHA R AWANA

2 IMAGES THE COSMETIC INDUSTRY IS ONE OF THE FASTEST GROWING INDUSTRIES IN THE WORLD AND ITS RAPID GROWTH IS MAINLY BECAUSE OF ITS ADVERTISING. A STUDY BY DOVE IN 2004 FOUND THAT THE IMAGES IN COSMETIC ADVERTISING WERE LOWERING CONSUMER’S SELF-ESTEEM

3 Cosmetic industry in Canada in 2010 made 1.3 billion dollars and a third of this revenue is spent on advertising Definition of cosmetics according to Oxford Dictionary: “elating to treatment intended to restore or improve a person’s appearance” Definition of cosmetics according to Health Canada and the Food and Drug Act: “Includes any substance or mixture of substances manufactured, sold or represented for use in cleansing, improving or altering the complexion, skin, hair or teeth, and includes deodorants and perfumes” Definition of Advertising according to the Food and Drug Act: “Includes any representation by any means whatever for the purpose of promoting directly or indirectly the sale or disposal of any food, drug, cosmetic or device.”

4 All cosmetics sold in Canada must meet the requirements of the Food and Drugs Act, Cosmetic Regulations and the Consumer Packaging and Labelling Act and Regulations. Claims on a label or in an ad for what a cosmetic can do must be accurate so they do not mislead people. Since certain claims, like increased attractiveness or increased masculinity, can only be judged subjectively, some puffery (exaggeration that does not mislead the public) is tolerated. However, be doubtful of any therapeutic claims (to modify body functions, prevent or treat disease) on a label that does not have a Drug Identification Number (DIN) or Natural Product Number (NPN) on it. Therapeutic claims are only allowed on drugs or natural health products, not on cosmetic products.

5 media Manufacturers may advertise cosmetic terms on labels on their product packaging, or in their radio, television or print ads. Some commonly used cosmetic terms in the media: Fragrance Free or Unscented This means that no fragrances have been added to the cosmetic product, or that a masking agent has been added to hide the scents from the other ingredients in the cosmetic. Some products labelled fragrance-free may actually contain "fragrance" or "parfum" on the list of ingredients. Hypoallergenic "Hypoallergenic" is neither a legal nor a scientific term. It simply means that the manufacturer has chosen ingredients to produce a finished product with minimum potential for causing allergy. This does not guarantee that the product will not cause an allergic reaction in some individuals, since people are allergic to a wide range of substances. There are no non-allergenic cosmetics. Not Tested on Animals This means the cosmetic product was not tested on animals, but does not guarantee that the individual ingredients were not tested on animals.

6 - cosmetic advertising and labelling guidelines What is acceptable and non-acceptable in cosmetic advertising claims

7 “BEAUTY BACKLASH” FILM women 76 % of women are insecure of the way they look Advertisers play off these insecurities as the worse we feel about ourselves the more we will buy Beauty companies rely on it in their advertising “to promise something to people” Entire beauty advertising is that you base yourself compared to the person in the ad The better they look, the more attainable they become and the worse we feel The ads create a need that the product can then fulfill

8 TECHNOLOGY A IRBRUSHED COSMETIC ADS BANNED - TECHNOLOGY CHANGING ADS

9 COVERGIRL WITHDRAWS “ENHANCED” TAYLOR SWIFT AD

10 gender Advertisements often emphasize sexuality and the importance of physical attractiveness in attempt to sell their products and this places pressure on women and men to focus on their appearance and trying to achieve the ideal for that gender that is seen in the misleading advertisements. The average person sees approximately 3000 ads a day

11 B RANDED B EAUTY : H OW MARKETING CHANGED THE WAY WE LOOK

12 FEMINISM FEMINISM AND COSMETICS In just over two decades, from the turn of the century to the years after the Great War, the image of women changed dramatically. The revelation and acceptance of the body were encouraged by the industrial fabrication of full-length mirrors, which were produced in greater numbers throughout the late 19th century, becoming a fixture of fashionable bedrooms. The emergence of a more liberated form of femininity coincided with a media revolution. Magazines and newspapers were becoming ever cheaper and more plentiful. In fashion publications and advertising, illustration was making way for photography, transforming hairdressers and make-up artists into stars. Commercial radio broadcasts began in the United States in 1922, adding to the clamour of voices that were calling out to consumers.

13 “BECAUSE I’M WORTH IT” BECAUSE IM WORTH IT BECAUSE YOU’RE WORTH IT BECAUSE WE’RE WORTH IT

14 L’Oréal’s famous tagline, ‘Because you’re worth it’. It’s the perfect pitch for a beauty company with a luxury positioning. In fact the slogan has been through several variations, starting in 1973 with ‘Because I’m worth it’. It was the ideal sentiment for a period when women were demanding greater equality. And it lasted until By then, the feminist message had been diluted and the line seemed arrogant and narcissistic, especially on the lips of an actress earning millions of dollars in endorsement fees. So it became the more inclusive ‘Because you’re worth it’. Later still, in 2009, the line was changed to ‘Because we’re worth it’, with the aim of reinforcing the connection between consumers and the brand.

15 D OVE E VOLUTION COMMERCIAL

16 DOVE C AMPAIGN The Dove Campaign for Real Beauty launched in successful element of the campaign was a 2007 online video called ‘Evolution’. This showed an ordinary girl facing the camera. A time-lapse sequence demonstrates how make-up, hair styling and – crucially – Photoshop alterations transform her from the girl next door into the kind of goddess we’re used to seeing in beauty ads. ‘No wonder our perception of beauty is distorted’ comments the end-line, before providing a link to Dove’s ‘Self-Esteem Fund’. This was created ‘to support different initiatives that help educate and inspire girls on a wider definition of beauty’.

17 BRANDED BEAUTY – OTHER TECHNIQUES Science Marketing The skill of beauty marketers is to ‘dramatize science’ in a way that convinces consumers the product will improve their looks. But consumer groups are cracking down on exaggerated claims by beauty brands, led by the Advertising Standards Authority in the United Kingdom – considered the toughest regulatory market. Products are tested by independent clinical trial laboratories – but the results are often manipulated in advertising copy. Celebrity Endorsing Celebrity endorsers embody the fantasy element of beauty branding – although they are also considered important for a brand’s prestige within the industry. Natural Cosmetics The Body Shop opened the way for a more polished and sophisticated generation of natural beauty brands in the 1990s. The brand’s purchase by L’Oréal confirmed that the natural beauty segment was now big business. More recently, environmental awareness coupled with consumer alarm about the chemicals in beauty products has elevated the demand for organic brands.

18 FOR MEN

19

20 M. A. C COSMETICS MAC, originally founded in Toronto in 1984 They dreamed of a make-up brand for everyone: ‘All ages, all races, all sexes.’ Their plan was to begin selling ‘to professional makeup artists and models, and then branch out from there. They have created a name for themselves without spending the million dollars on advertising. By being one of the first cosmetic companies to support charities and featuring controversial celebrities, their marketing techniques are innovative and unconventional

21 S OURCES Health Canada - Oxford Dictionaris - The Guardian: L'Oréal's Julia Roberts and Christy Turlington ad campaigns banned - banned banned New York Times: CoverGirl Withdraws ‘Enhanced’ Taylor Swift Ad - enhanced-taylor-swift-ad/ enhanced-taylor-swift-ad/ Branded Beauty: How Marketing Changed the Way We Look - Tungate, Mark. ( © 2011). Available From: The Beauty Backlash - d=37080# d=37080# Toronto Star: Dove's `Evolution' ad wins at Cannes -

22 THANKS FOR LISTENING


Download ppt "COSMETIC ADVERTISING The misleading images that are produced and represented in mass media for our consumption B Y S ASHA R AWANA."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google