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 Please sit with your PLC folks….  Presented by:  Michelle Cuddeback  Becky DeSalvo  Karen Green  Jay Preskenis Student Learning Goals: Focus on.

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Presentation on theme: " Please sit with your PLC folks….  Presented by:  Michelle Cuddeback  Becky DeSalvo  Karen Green  Jay Preskenis Student Learning Goals: Focus on."— Presentation transcript:

1  Please sit with your PLC folks…

2  Presented by:  Michelle Cuddeback  Becky DeSalvo  Karen Green  Jay Preskenis Student Learning Goals: Focus on Student Learning & Growth through Multiple Measures

3  SLG Writing Process  Differentiate between Student Achievement Goals and Student Growth Goals  Ascertain Appropriate Assessments  Draft Sample Student Learning Goals

4 Self Assessment/ Reflection (Aug/Sept) (June) Observation/ Collection of Evidence Goal Setting (Sept/Oct) Initial Conference (Oct 15-31) Observation/ Collection of Evidence (Sept-May) Formative Assessment/Mid Year Review (Jan/Feb) Summative Evaluation (May/June) Ongoing Professional Development **page 11 in handbook

5  Focus on student results  Explicitly connect teaching and learning  Improve instructional practices and teacher performance  Tool for school improvement

6 MULTIPLE MEASURES FOR TEACHER & ADMINISTRATOR EFFECTIVENESS Oregon Framework for Teacher and Administrator Evaluation and Support Systems (aka SB290) Student Learning and Growth All measures are supported through artifacts and evidence. Professional Responsibilities (Domains 5 & 6) Professional Practice (Domains 1-4) Evidence

7 Student Learning GOALS –Write two Student Learning Goals minimum –Two of the three categories of Student Learning Measures must be used (see next slide) –If you are ELA/Math, Grades 4-8 –1 of your 2 goals must use OAKS data –Your other goal must use student learning measures from category 2 or 3 –If you are not ELA/Math Grades 4-8 –Your goals must include student learning measures from two of the three categories

8 CategoryTypes of Measures of Student Learning (aligned to standards) Examples include, but are not limited to: 1 State or national standardized tests Oregon Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (OAKS), SMARTER Balanced (when adopted), English Language Proficiency Assessment (ELPA), Extended Assessments 2 Common national, international, regional, district-developed measures ACT, PLAN, EXPLORE, AP, IB, DIBELS, C-PAS, other national measures; or common assessments approved by the district or state as valid, reliable and able to be scored comparably across schools or classrooms 3 Classroom-based or school-wide measures Student performances, portfolios, products, projects, work samples, tests Measures of student learning and growth include three types of measures: ** page 5 in handbook

9  Generally includes the following 5 steps: 1.Identify core content and standards 2.Gather and analyze student baseline data 3.Determine the focus of the SLG 4.Select or develop formative assessments 5.Develop a SMART goal statement and rationale –Goal form page 20 in handbook –More information on process on page 26 in handbook

10 Step 1: Determine needs Step 2: Create specific learning goals based on pre- assessment Step 3: Create and implement teaching and learning strategies Step 4: Monitor student progress through ongoing formative assessment Step 5: Determine whether students achieved the goals ** page 30 in handbook

11 8 th Grade Language Arts Teacher Pre-Assessment of Student Ability in Writing  98 students in four heterogeneously grouped classes  19 IEP students

12 Guiding Questions:  What national or state standards are address by the course?  What are the essential skills and content knowledge that students will need in order to be successful next year?  In which of these essential skills and content knowledge are students struggling?  What are the specific academic concepts, skills or behaviors the SLG will target?

13 Rubric used for Assessing Students 1234 Audience & Purpose The writer may identify a general topic but demonstrates little or no awareness of purpose or audience. The writer identifies a generalized purpose or audience but does not maintain focus on both. Instead, the writer focuses more on the task than the actual purpose or intended audience. The writer adequately establishes focus on the intended audience and purpose, but may not consistently maintain this focus, losing sight of audience or purpose on occasion. The writer establishes and maintains focus on audience and purpose and effectively engages the audience by providing relevant background information. Idea Development The writer gives little or no purposeful development of ideas, interpretation, insight or clarification. No examples or details are provided or support is irrelevant. The writer demonstrates inconsistent development of ideas often presenting facts with little insight, interpretation, or clarification. The writer provides minimal or irrelevant examples and/or details for support. The writer develops ideas with adequate support, and clarification of the topic through examples, details, facts, explanations, descriptions, or arguments. The writer consistently develops ideas with depth and complexity to provide insight, support, and clarification of the topic. The writer consistently develops ideas using appropriate and effective examples, details, facts, explanations, descriptions or arguments. Organization & Structure The writer offers little or no organizational structure, placing ideas in no logical order. There is little or no variety in sentence structures. The writer demonstrates some attempt at organization, but often places ideas in an unclear order that disrupts the natural flow or cohesion. The writer occasionally uses varied sentence structures, these appear alongside mostly simple sentences. The writer adequately organizes the writing by using a logical progression of ideas that generally flows from idea to ideas, though connections between some ideas are less clear on occasion. The writer consistently organizes the writing by using a logical progression of ideas that flows within and between paragraphs. The writer consistently uses a variety of sentence lengths and structures.

14 StudentAudience & Purpose Idea Development Organization & Structure Student 1221 Student 2334 Student 3111 Student 4221 Student 5322 Student 6322 Student 7211 Student 8111 Student 9333 Student 10221 Student 11322 Student 12333 Student 13111 Student 14334 Student 15322 Student 16222 Student 17 111 Student 18332 Student 19334 Student 20211

15 Student Performance by Groups Low Performing Students Mid Performing Students High Performing Students Audience & Purpose 1.02.543.0 Idea Development 1.02.083.0 Organization & Structure 1.01.624.0

16 Baseline Data What are the learning needs of my students? Attach supporting data I worked with the other LA teachers in the district to create a common assessment using criteria from the writing rubric. The data from the pre- assessment shows that 4 students scored very low, 3 scored very high and all areas of writing are low. I then grouped the students according to their scores to see that the low performers averaged 1.0 in all three areas of the rubric which is significantly lower that the mid performing group. The high performing group avg. 4.0 on Organization and Structure, but the other two group avg. below 2.

17 Step 1: Determine needs Step 2: Create specific learning goals based on pre- assessment Step 3: Create and implement teaching and learning strategies Step 4: Monitor student progress through ongoing formative assessment Step 5: Determine whether students achieved the goals **Page 30 in handbook

18  Account for 100% of students in course between both goals  Be SMART  Be Growth Goal

19 Course-level SLGs  Entire caseload in that course is covered  Easiest to do this with common preps or self- contained classes Tiered targets within a course-level SLG  If data analysis shows wide range of skill/ability  Different targets for different groups of students Targeted SLG (can only do if other goal already meets Course-level requirements)  Subgroups of students or specific skills

20 Define HEID for SLG1 Fill in the blank row with concrete numbers to delineate between the levels for summative assessment. Highly Effective: Exceptional number of students achieve goal (Eg. 90% or above) Effective : Significant number of students achieve goal (Eg. 80%- 89%) Improvement Necessary: Less than significant number of students achieve goal (Eg. 70%-79%) Does Not Meet: Few students achieve goal (Eg. below 70%)

21 S Specific- The goal addresses student needs within the content. The goal is focused on a specific area of need. M Measurable- An appropriate instrument or measure is selected to assess the goal. The goal is measurable and uses an appropriate instrument. A Appropriate- The goal is clearly related to the role and responsibilities of the teacher. The goal is standards- based and directly related to the subject and students that the teacher teaches. R Realistic- The goal is attainable. The goal is doable, but rigorous and stretches the outer bounds of what is attainable. T Time-bound- The goal is contained to a single school year/course. The goal is bound by a timeline that is definitive and allows for determining goal attainment.

22 Growth GoalsAchievement Goals Start with baseline dataDoes not consider baseline data Intended to include all students regardless of ability level Student goals are a “one- size-fit-all” Students can show various levels of growth- students may have individualized finish lines All students are expected to cross the same finish line regardless of where they start

23 With a partner,  Decide if the goal provided is SMART.  Refer to the SMART Criteria.  If it is not SMART, discuss possible adjustments to meet SMART criteria.  Decide if the goal is Achievement or Growth  If it is not a growth goal, discuss possible adjustments to make it a growth goal..

24 P.E. Teacher’s Goal For the 2013-14 school year: Curl ups: Level 1 students will increase their baseline by 9; Level 2 students by 7; Level 3 students by 4 Mile Run: Level 1 students will decrease their baseline by 4 min.; Level 2 students by 2 min.; Level 3 by 1 min. Reach and stretch: Level 1 students will increase their baseline by 7 cm.; Level 2 by 5 cm.; Level 3 by 2 cm. As measured by the Presidential Fitness Test

25 Science Teacher’s Goal For the current school year, all of my students will make measurable progress in each of the four areas related to scientific investigation (hypothesis, investigative design, data collection, data analysis). All students will achieve at the 3 level of performance on a 4-point rubric in each area.

26 Art Teacher’s Goal All students will demonstrate measurable progress in each of the rubric areas (Elements & Principles, Creativity & Originality, Craftsmanship/Skill). At least 50% of students will score 3 on the 5-point rubric.

27 It is just practice this year (2013-14) Not about: How many kids “meet” or “exceed” standards How much I “grow” the number of kids who meet/exceed

28 Student Growth Goal Statement: For the 2012 – 13 school year students will make measurable progress in writing- 80% of the students will score a “3” or better overall. A good goal statement is one that is… Specific Measurable Appropriate Realistic Time-bound

29 Student Growth Goal Statement: For the 2012 – 13 school year, 100% of students will make measurable progress in writing. Each student will improve by one performance level in two or more areas of the rubric (audience/purpose, idea development, organization & structure). Furthermore, 80% of the students will score a “3” or better overall. A good goal statement is one that is… Specific Measurable Appropriate Realistic Time-bound

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32 In your PLC, identify assessments you currently use Identify which are: Category 1 Category 2 Category 3

33 CategoryTypes of Measures of Student Learning (aligned to standards) Examples include, but are not limited to: 1 State or national standardized tests Oregon Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (OAKS), SMARTER Balanced (when adopted), English Language Proficiency Assessment (ELPA), Extended Assessments 2 Common national, international, regional, district-developed measures ACT, PLAN, EXPLORE, AP, IB, DIBELS, C-PAS, other national measures; or common assessments approved by the district or state as valid, reliable and able to be scored comparably across schools or classrooms 3 Classroom-based or school-wide measures Student performances, portfolios, products, projects, work samples, tests Measures of student learning and growth include three types of measures: ** page 5 in handbook

34 Formative Assessments Classroom Assessments Projects Products Student Portfolios Student Performances Common Assessments District Assessments

35 Formative Assessments Classroom Assessments Projects Products Student Portfolios Student Performances Common Assessments District Assessments Aligned to Standards Descriptive Rubrics

36 Guiding Questions:  Is this assessment the best way to measure student progress toward the objective?  Does this assessment allow all students to demonstrate developmentally appropriate growth?  Does this assessment follow district and state guidelines?  How will I ensure assessments are graded in a fair and unbiased manner?

37  Brainstorm strategies Anna can implement to meet her goal and record on Goal Template.

38 Students will use a writer’s notebook for writing practice, specifically developing ideas and focusing on specific audiences for specific purposes. Students will analyze organizational structure of narrative, informational/explanatory, and argumentative writing and apply to their own writing. Students will participate in peer response groups to give/receive feedback on audience awareness, purpose, and idea development. Strategies for Improvement I will implement strategies learned during Rigor and Relevance training and develop writing prompts for students to use in their writer’s notebooks. I will refine my implementation of the standards, researching and implementing engaging and rigorous teaching strategies that deepen student understanding of organizational structures and uses in their own writing. I will refine my use of ongoing formative assessment to impact daily instruction by teaching students to lead classroom discussions and peer reviews. I will incorporate these in practice. Student BehaviorsTeacher Behaviors

39 Self Assessment/ Reflection (Aug/Sept) (June) Observation/ Collection of Evidence Goal Setting (Sept/Oct) Initial Conference (Oct 15-31) Observation/ Collection of Evidence (Sept-May) Formative Assessment/Mid Year Review (Jan/Feb) Summative Evaluation (May/June) Ongoing Professional Development **page 11 in handbook

40  Find someone you might want to collaborate with this year  Begin the process to drafting ideas… Step 1: Determine needs Step 2: Create specific learning goals based on pre- assessment Step 3: Create and implement teaching and learning strategies Step 4: Monitor student progress through ongoing formative assessment Step 5: Determine whether students achieved the goals

41  SLG Writing Process  Differentiate between Student Achievement Goals and Student Growth Goals  Ascertain Appropriate Assessments  Draft Sample Student Learning Goals

42  Leave questions on targets  Leave questions/ comments/ feedback on reflection sheet  E-mail us at evaluation@ashland.k12.or.us evaluation@ashland.k12.or.us


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