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A CASE STUDY OF OREGON’S TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAMS EXECUTIVE MPA CAPSTONE PRESENTATION PORTLAND STATE UNIVERSITY NOVEMBER 30, 2012 DEBRA M. ELLIS Preparing.

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Presentation on theme: "A CASE STUDY OF OREGON’S TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAMS EXECUTIVE MPA CAPSTONE PRESENTATION PORTLAND STATE UNIVERSITY NOVEMBER 30, 2012 DEBRA M. ELLIS Preparing."— Presentation transcript:

1 A CASE STUDY OF OREGON’S TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAMS EXECUTIVE MPA CAPSTONE PRESENTATION PORTLAND STATE UNIVERSITY NOVEMBER 30, 2012 DEBRA M. ELLIS Preparing Pre-Service Teachers to Engage Families in Their Child(ren)’s Education

2 Overview Statement of the Problem and Research Questions Methodology and Findings  Phase I: Literature Review and Findings  Phase II: Curriculum Review and Findings  Sample  Methods  Curriculum Review and Findings  Limitations Recommendations and Conclusions  Summary Recommendations  Leadership Implications Acknowledgements / Thanks 2

3 Statement of Problem and Research Question Research has shown that… parental involvement results in mutual benefits to students and teachers. when teachers are dissatisfied with their jobs, they are likely to leave teaching within the first five years. 40 percent cite lack of parental support as the reason for leaving—this was the #1 reason cited. there is limited evidence that pre-service teacher training programs are providing adequate teacher training in the area of family and parent involvement. 3

4 Statement of Problem and Research Question Research Questions How do teacher education programs in Oregon prepare pre-service teachers to work with parents and family members? What lessons can be learned from this case study to increase the efficiency of Oregon’s Teacher Preparation Programs in the area of parent involvement/ family engagement? 4

5 Methodology and Findings 5 Phase I: Literature Review and Findings Research on the benefits of parental involvement on student academic achievement.  Students with involved parents are more likely to  earn higher grades and test scores, and enroll in higher-level programs  be promoted, pass their classes, and earn credits  attend school regularly  have better social skills, show improved behavior, and adapt well to school  graduate and go on to postsecondary education

6 Methodology and Findings 6 Phase I: Literature and Findings Teacher attitudes about parents – teacher barriers to parental involvement.  Teachers feel great anxiety, concern, worry, and fright when it comes to interacting with families.  Teachers often view parent-teacher interactions as an added burden and as a source of anger, intimidation, and conflict.  The anxiety surrounding parent-teacher interactions increases as the population of students (and their families) becomes more diverse.

7 Methodology and Findings 7 Phase I: Literature Review and Findings Research on the impact of parental involvement on teacher job satisfaction and career longevity. Research on teacher’s perceived ability to effectively engage families in their child’s education.  Teachers often lack the confidence of being able to engage parents in family involvement efforts, especially if they have had little or no training to do so.

8 Methodology and Findings 8 Phase I: Literature Review and Findings Research on the presence of parental involvement components in teacher preparation programs.  Pre-service education provides little training to prospective teachers on how to create school-family partnerships.  The problem of inadequate training is due to a lack of course availability.  Course work alone is inadequate to fully prepare teachers to work with families. Teacher education programs should provide prospective teachers with the hands-on training for working with families and parents.

9 Methodology and Findings Phase II: Curriculum Review and Findings - Sample  20 approved teacher preparation programs  16 community colleges 9

10 Methodology and Findings Phase II: Curriculum Review and Findings - Methods Review of publically available materials (web site, college catalogs, etc.) Used a systematic approach – based upon literature review and findings – to identify relevant program elements, strategies, and initiatives that mentioned components of parent involvement, family engagement, or school-home partnerships. 10

11 Methodology and Findings Phase II: Curriculum Review and Findings Course Offerings Varied widely among schools  One college had only one partial, non-required undergrad class  Another university had 22 total courses  (7 full, 15 partial / 9 undergrad, 13 grad / 11 required – 5 ECE, 3 Special Education and 1 ESL) Fell within three primary functions:  Understand Families/Family Systems  Develop Strategies for Working with Families  Recognize the Families Role in Child/Adolescent Development or Families Role in Child’s Education 11

12 Methodology and Findings Phase II: Curriculum Review and Findings 246 courses  96 Graduate/ 49 Undergraduate /101 Associates  48 full / 198 partial  144 ECE / 12 Middle and High School Level  62 Special Education / 26 ESL  18 Practical 12

13 Methodology and Findings Phase II: Curriculum Review and Findings - Limitations Only Publically Available Materials – no follow up surveys or in-depth interviews  No way to ascertain the extent that the parent involvement components are included in the course. Only Coursework – no way to determine hands-on opportunities Only Teachers – did not review offerings for counselors, principals or other educators No way to ascertain what results these courses have in terms of practice. 13

14 Recommendations and Conclusions 14 RecommendationFindingResearch Further, more in-depth study of the teacher education programs to ascertain their full coverage in the areas of parent involvement and family engagement. Only Publically Available Materials Only Coursework No way to ascertain the extent that the parent involvement components are included in the course. More consistency across the colleges/universities. Varied widely among schools  One college had only one partial, non-required undergrad class  Another university had 22 total courses Require more of the already existing courses in general education classes and at the middle and high school level. 144 ECE / 12 Middle and High School Level Infused in some other course, or taught separately, preservice teachers should have a comprehensive picture of the many benefits of a broadly defined parent involvement, as well as be aware of key areas that can make them more effective when working with students and their families (Epstein, 2001; Shartrand, Weiss, Kreider & Lopez, 1997). Especially making teachers who will teach in middle and high schools—where parent involvement is not an expected part of the educational process—aware of the influential effects of parent involvement is essential (HFRP, 2004). Add more practical courses or more practical applications within regular courses. 18 Practical Course work alone is not adequate to fully prepare teachers to work with families. Hiatt-Michael (2001) suggested that hands-on training was necessary for working effectively with families and parents. Provide pre-service teachers with more opportunities to interact with parents before the start their careers. 18 Practical Both personal experiences and research have confirmed that teachers feel great anxiety, concern, defensiveness, trepidation, worry, and fright when it comes to relating to and interacting with families (Hargreaves, 2000, 2001). Continue to increase the coursework for assisting educators in understanding and working with diverse families. 26 ESOL Anxiety surrounding parent-teacher interactions increases as the diversity of the student population increases (Leithwood & Duke, 1998; Van Hook, 2002; Villegas, 1991).  Increasing diversity in Oregon. 8.36% teachers/ 33.69% students are minorities. Highest difference is for Hispanics, 20.5% of students/ 3.6% of teachers.

15 Recommendations and Conclusions The following recommendations are based on the literature review and the research findings. 1. Further, more in-depth study of the teacher education programs to ascertain their full coverage in the areas of parent involvement and family engagement. 2. More consistency across the colleges/universities. 3. Require more of the already existing courses in general education classes and at the middle and high school level. 15

16 Recommendations and Conclusions 4. Add more practical courses or more practical applications within regular courses. 5. Provide pre-service teachers with more opportunities to interact with parents before they start their careers. 6. Continue to increase the coursework for assisting educators in understanding and working with diverse families. 16

17 Recommendations and Conclusions Leadership Development First – My assumption was wrong. There was much more going on in the schools then I had assumed!  Single-loop/Double-loop learning. Creates the type of environment where we learn from our “mistakes” and have opportunities for life-long learning. Change happens – but sometimes at glacial speed.  Growth models of change versus static measurements that are sometimes arbitrary and meaningless. Importance of Passions.  Especially when it comes to public service, our passions are what keeps us going and drives us! 17

18 Acknowledgements / Thanks Dr. Douglas Morgan and Dr. Marcus Ingle Matt, Liz, and Avery Ellis Tom Reynolds and Judy Brady Katherine Gorretta, Randy Reynolds, Terri Morgan, Lynne Marty, JC Ellison Questions? 18


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