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SF Coordinating Center Multicenter Trials Industry-sponored Trials Pilot Studies Steve Cummings, MD Director, SF Coordinating Center.

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Presentation on theme: "SF Coordinating Center Multicenter Trials Industry-sponored Trials Pilot Studies Steve Cummings, MD Director, SF Coordinating Center."— Presentation transcript:

1 SF Coordinating Center Multicenter Trials Industry-sponored Trials Pilot Studies Steve Cummings, MD Director, SF Coordinating Center

2 SF Coordinating Center Outline Multicenter studies Industry-sponsored trials Pilot studies for trials

3 SF Coordinating Center Dr. D Large dermatology practice Interest in psoriasis Wants to participate in multicenter trials of new treatments

4 SF Coordinating Center Multicenter studies Anatomy Physiology How to work with them Example: MrOS

5 SF Coordinating Center NIH-style studies Data Coordinating Center - Makes forms & manuals - Compiles data for analysis Clinical sites - Recruit subjects - Transmits data to CC

6 SF Coordinating Center NIH-style studies Data Coordinating Center - Makes forms & manuals - Compiles data for analysis Clinical sites - Recruit subjects - Transmits data to CC Other functions depend on the study Design, analysis, assessing clinical outcomes

7 SF Coordinating Center NIH-style studies Overall PI  Got the grant; leads the study Clinical site PIs  Run the sites; variable say re: the study Steering Committee  Represents all sites and CC  Sets the policies; ultimate arbiter

8 SF Coordinating Center Publications Committee Publications and Analysis Committee  Usually a subset of the SComm  Develops guidelines for approval  Reviews and approves proposals for analyses, papers (and ancillary studies)  Democratic

9 SF Coordinating Center Industry sponsored trials Sponsor - Designs the trial - Chooses sites - Analyzes data Clinical sites - Recruit subjects - Transmits data to CRO CRO* CRO (hired by sponsor) - Creates the forms - Collects/collates data - Monitor sites Sponsor CRO = ‘Contract Research Organization Companies that provide research services

10 SF Coordinating Center Most industry trials Sponsor does it all  Designs study, develops forms and protocols  Analyzes data; selects authors; write the articles Investigators  Paid to recruit patients  Investigator meetings  No representation in decisions

11 SF Coordinating Center A few industry trials More collaborative with investigators  ‘Lead’ investigators involved in design  Steering Committee (a few investigators)  Publications Committee Investigators  Most still just paid to recruit patients  Investigator meetings Example: Denosumab (FREEDOM) Trial

12 SF Coordinating Center A few (ideal) industry trials Steering Committee  Minority representation from sponsor  Real authority (official charter)  Changes in design. Stopping the trial. Publications and Analysis Committee  Minority representation from sponsor  Publication guidelines (a contract)  Develop and review analysis plans  Review and approve papers

13 SF Coordinating Center Reasons to be a site NIH multicenter study Participate in scientific investigation Use data; publish Get promoted Support staff

14 SF Coordinating Center Reasons to be a site in the typical industry trial Funding for you and staff Profit (industry funds are worth more than NIH funds) New treatment alternatives to patients A chance for correlative science? A step toward larger roles with the sponsor Appear on publications Value for promotion??

15 SF Coordinating Center What we (SFCC) look for in a site Past performance Rapid recruitment of large numbers Responsive and involved colleagues  (Avoid complainers and nonresponders) Scientific expertise High quality work (clean data)

16 SF Coordinating Center What Industry looks for in sites Past performance  Number recruited  Not a ‘problem site’ Current capability to recruit Reputation of the investigator  Thought leader  Active contributor: expertise, consulting, productive writer.

17 SF Coordinating Center Would you like to be a site? Get a reputation  Become a local or national leader  Recruit successfully Borrow a reputation  Have a mentor or experienced colleague make contacts (Industry: Contact your local ‘rep’)

18 SF Coordinating Center Disadvantages of being a site in industry trials Can lose money

19 SF Coordinating Center Disadvantages of being a site in industry trials Can lose money Can lose a lot of money

20 SF Coordinating Center Competitive recruitment Trials have set recruitment goal Industry pays per subject Those who recruit most make most  Possible to make $$$  Possible to lose $$$  The case of the “Lone Academic” Top recruiter is often 1st author

21 SF Coordinating Center Disadvantages of being a site in industry trials Can lose money Distraction from other types of work or research Hassles  Site monitoring  FDA inspections

22 SF Coordinating Center How to be a great clinical site An excellent study coordinator A registry of patients (subjects)  Characteristics  Consent to be contacted for research Excellent responsive support  Contracts office  IRB

23 SF Coordinating Center Publications and industry

24 SF Coordinating Center Publications Sponsors own the data Data analyzed and drafted by  The sponsor statistician and medical writer  A hired “CME” firm External authors invited to author a paper  Provided analyses or draft  May write a draft or ‘edit’ the sponsors draft

25 SF Coordinating Center Now for some heresies… “Access to data” “Right to publish”

26 SF Coordinating Center Universities: investigators must have ‘access to the data’ “Access to data” is meaningless  Sponsors employ the data analysts  Sponsor’s team directs and selects analyses  Authors are rarely involved (or skilled) in data analysis, rarely look at data output

27 SF Coordinating Center Universities: investigators must have ‘the right to publish’ “Right to publish” is usually meaningless  Your data is one small part of the larger trial; would be wrong to publish a part  Hard to analyze and publish without support for analysis and writing  Investigators should not have a ‘right to publish’ results that are wrong

28 SF Coordinating Center An ideal approach to publications from from industry Insist on a Publications Committee  With guidelines as a contract  Reviews plans and papers before submission  Minority voting representation from the sponsor Data available for analysis by independent statistician-analyst  Some journals are insisting Writing the paper  No medical writers?  Or writers assist investigators

29 SF Coordinating Center Pilot studies

30 SF Coordinating Center Why pilots Feasibility  To determine if you can do it.  To convince funders you can do it To improve the study  More efficient  Prevent screw-ups

31 SF Coordinating Center Example: T trial Green tea has been associated with lower risk of breast cancer Inexpensive and safe Proposal  Large randomized trial to test green tea extract vs. placebo X 3 years  Randomize women who attend mammography units and have high breast density to capsules of placebo or green tea

32 SF Coordinating Center T trial Easy to recruit from the Center  Breast density can be assessed on the mammogram  No need for exclusions  45,000 women get mammography / year Periodically mail study supplements to home Follow-up by internet and future mammography visits Ascertain cancer by ed or phoned self- report or periodic search of the SEER registry

33 SF Coordinating Center T trial Idea has been enthusiastically received A group has met to develop a proposal to NCI What type of pilot data would we need?

34 SF Coordinating Center

35 SF Coordinating Center Pilot studies To test feasibility of recruitment  Survey participants  Conduct a ‘pilot trial’ To test the feasibility of interventions, procedures and measurements  How much green tea to have an effect?  Side effects of large doses of the extract?  Will women adhere?

36 SF Coordinating Center Pilot studies To determine power  Variability of the main measurement  Rates of outcome in real participants To estimate costs and need for staffing

37 SF Coordinating Center Pilot studies To determine power  Variability of the main measurement  Rates of outcome in real participants To estimate costs and need for staffing

38 SF Coordinating Center How big should pilots be? “It depends” Sample size estimates sometimes useful Traditions and guesses  NCI phase I trials start with 3  Dry runs: 3 to 10 of same age, health Usually depends on resources and time

39 SF Coordinating Center Do pilots need control groups? It depends New treatments  Determining the highest tolerable dose of green tea?  Determining the effect of green tea on breast density? Feasibility?  Generally irrelevant (e.g., potential participants’ eligibility and willingness to enroll).

40 SF Coordinating Center Funding for pilots Small and quick Local institution  Academic Senate…  CTSI grants Disease foundations Industry reps Mentors… Can often be done with volunteer help

41 SF Coordinating Center IRB approval for pilots Pilots involving people (or medical records) generally need IRB approval Testing questionnaire or strength testing devise with staff?

42 SF Coordinating Center A real example Dr. B plans to administer a detailed survey to over 3,000 women who have received care at a the High Risk Breast Center She has extensively developed a 15 page questionnaire What type of pilots would you suggest?

43 SF Coordinating Center Thank you!


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