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EUCLIDES – What’s new and what’s good in Italy… 29.08.08 Istanbul 2nd Project Meeting This project has been funded with support from the European Commission.

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Presentation on theme: "EUCLIDES – What’s new and what’s good in Italy… 29.08.08 Istanbul 2nd Project Meeting This project has been funded with support from the European Commission."— Presentation transcript:

1 EUCLIDES – What’s new and what’s good in Italy… Istanbul 2nd Project Meeting This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. EUCLIDES – Enhancing the Use of Cooperative Learning to Increase Development of Science studies LLL IT-COMENIUS-CMP

2 Italian Good Practices Let’s start with a brief national overview…

3 Italian Good Practices According to the research we did, we found out that:  In Italy many initiatives have already been experimented to make science studies more attractive  Also PBL has been tested even if not always it has been called with its name  The main national initiatives are organized in two main steps: 1.a training for trainers section; 2.a test phase when the trainers experiment what they’ve learnt

4 Italian Good Practices Let’s introduce some examples… of PBL applied to the Scientific topics study

5 Italian Good Practices PROJECT Brief description is a joint project between MIUR and Microsoft “Partners in learning” started in It is a teacher training project aimed at teaching through technology. This included video-seminars, multimedia resources and tutorship experts that involved the participants in a virtual-learning community. The project was thought for secondary school teachers and was sponsored by the publisher Giunti. The objective of Project was to give teachers the opportunity to acquire knowledge necessary to develop PBL activities in schools. The project is part of the national plan for development of Digital School born out from the co-operation between MIUR and Microsoft “Partners in learning” within the framework of a very specific programme: teacher training for the use of technology in teaching. Methodology The project was carried out with the e-learning method and was structured as follows: use of the PBL materials such as video-seminars, handbooks and suggestions for implementation, bibliography, PBL files with materials for teachers and students, materials for in-depth studies, indexes, linkography and resources chosen by the tutor; attendance to meetings group activities for PBL files production Each participant has been part of a virtual class divided in three areas of study: psychosocial, history, human science and technical/scientific During the first phase the teachers studied the materials, then they started group debates under the tutor’s supervision, sharing ideas, proposals, suggestions and experiences and finally they studied the PBL files, both together and individually.

6 Project Strengths The support research on PBL has highlighted that students are more proficient if they are dealing with real life problems that require facing issues in the outside world. Working on a project motivates students to be active and look for solutions. Also the teachers’ role is changing, as it is no longer only a dispenser of knowledge but also and foremost someone who makes learning easier in a joint effort context. Technology then becomes the tool for easier work planning, for co-operation and accomplishment of the project since it is the natural framework for knowledge sharing. Criticalities The following are some of the obstacles to the development of PBL projects: Clarity in outlining the problem: Originality of the idea and motivation; Clarity and significance in identifying the objectives; Integration in the syllabus; Coherence in integrating technologies in the teaching strategy; Clarity and coherence in evaluation procedure. Opportunities “Empirical evidence” shows that students with limited speaking and communication skills achieve significantly better results with PBL. This would strengthen the hypothesis that the PBL approach is more successful when trying to bring up to level students who are in some difficulty. Threats Another important issue to think over is the fact that teachers still have problems in passing from identification to a teaching topic and the approach to the relevant problems.

7 Project Experimentation in class connected to Science Studies: “Energy… What future?” “Sustainable growth: the environment and its impact on economy” “Global Warming” “Research on water resources and per capita consumption” “Renewable energy and the Kyoto Protocol”

8 Project An example “Energy… What future?” Brief description In this project students think about pollution related to the type of energy used nowadays. The working method entails their active involvement by assessing the impact of energy consumption and working out feasible saving plans. Subjects: interdisciplinary project. Technology and computer science, science, geography. Target: II degree secondary schools

9 Project Experimentation in class: “Energy… What future?” How the experimentation has been developed Outline of the problem - Global outlook - Energy “hunger” in the world - Possible models and scenarios Objectives Understand the value of energy Awareness of the fact that energy is not “something” to be used lightly Learn lexicon of the energy world Understand the importance of energy saving beginning with one’s daily behaviour Plan, prepare and present a multimedia project on these issues. Activities, steps and timetable With the help of one’s parents, prepare a survey on domestic energy costs (Electricity bills, car and scooter fuel, central heating …) Presentation and debate in class over results (2 hours) Web research of material useful for multimedia work (4 hours) Power Point presentation on the theme “Energy … What future?” (6 hours) Presentation of the work (4h)

10 Project Experimentation in class: “Energy… What future?” How the experimentation has been developed Details The project is divided into 5 steps: the group work will begin from step 3 and the students will share the results. The work will have to be completed in chronological order. Each group will be of 3 or 4 students. Requirements For group and not for single students Know how to use a software for word processing, image processing, multimedia presentation, web research Have an internet connected pc at home Technological Settings Hardware: a computer at the Lab and in each of the students’ homes, a scanner, a printer Software: Internet browser, Multimedia program, Image processing program

11 Project Experimentation in class: “Energy… What future?” How the experimentation has been developed Abilities (introduced or consolidated) create and format documents for the multimedia presentation process images insert still or moving images, graphs, tables revision and edit texts extra research of materials such as films, websites, books etc.

12 CATEGORY4 (8-10)3 (6-8)2 (4-6)1 (1-4) Presentation Well described flowing composition, high level of attention in the audience. Sufficiently flowing, high level of attention in the audience for most f the time. Not flowing but capable to keep the audience interested for most of the time. Not flowing, the audience often loses attention. Sources Information collected for all diagrams, facts and quotations. Everything is documented in the chosen format. In formation collected for all diagrams, facts and quotations. Most of the material is documented in the chosen format. In formation collected for all diagrams, facts and quotations, but not documented in the chosen format. Scant or no information at all on sources. Visual attraction Excellent use of characters, colours, graphics, effects etc. to improve presentation. Good use of characters, colours, graphics, effects etc. to improve presentation. Use of characters, colours, graphics, effects etc, but occasionally diverting attention from the contents of the presentation. Use of characters, colours, graphics, effects etc, but often diverting attention from the contents of the presentation. Language No grammar or writing errors.From 1 to 3 writing and/or grammar errors. 4 writing and/or grammar errorsMore than 4 writing and/or grammar errors Contents Covers topic in depth with detailed examples. Excellent knowledge of the subject. Includes essential knowledge of the topic and seems to be good. Includes essential knowledge of the topic, but there are one or two serious errors. The content is poor and there are many serious errors. Organisation Well organised contents with use of titles and lists of the material. Use of titles and lists and general organisation of the work appears to be imperfect. Most of the content is logically organised. There is no logic and clear organisation structure but only random facts put together. Oral presentation Well described flowing composition, high level of attention in the audience. Sufficiently flowing, high level of attention in the audience for most f the time. Not flowing but capable to keep the audience interested for most of the time. Not flowing, the audience often loses attention. Originality Very original work. Supported by creative ideas. Quite original work. Supported by some new ideas. Uses ideas of others (although quoting the sources). There is some original thought. Mere use of ideas of others with no quoting. Work The work has been properly carried out in co-operation. The work has been carried out in co- operation, although some have done more than others. The work has been carried out in co- operation, but one student has not fulfilled his duties. The work has not been carried out in co-operation, and more than one student has not fulfilled his duties. Project EVALUATION RUBRIC

13 Italian Good Practices PROJECT Chemicals, the environment and us: a joint action between schools and research institutes Brief description The project "Chemicals, the environment and us: a joint action between schools and research institutes" addressed to middle and high school students and teachers, has been promoted by the Italian National Institute of Health, supported by the Italian Ministry of University and Research. The project has been developed thanks to the grant obtained through law 6/2000 for the development of scientific culture and since 2001 is has been addressed to both students and teachers of the secondary school. 130 First and Second grade secondary school teachers form Lazio, Campania, Tuscany, Umbria, Sicily, Puglia, Liguria and Emilia-Romagna have taken part to the training courses. These courses have supplied essential and in depth information on the effect of chemicals The lessons have given essential and specific information on chemicals as resulted in the students researches and have also given the opportunity to ascertain the transferability to school programmes of the complex contents and methods.

14 Project Chemicals, the environment and us Experimentation in class: The Liceo Classico "Virgilio“ in Rome Experience ROME

15 The Liceo Classico "Virgilio“ in Rome Experience During the school year they have dealt with the project on chemicals from a biology/geography point of view (1 hour weekly) in the two classes of the experimental two- year course (classic and scientific). The work began with a presentation to the students of the results of previous projects and they were asked to express their opinion. One student proposed to begin the new project with the following problem: “One student has lost a friend in the tsunami and asks if human behavior is contributing to natural disasters” Work groups were then organized and the starting point was the Kyoto Protocol: how it was accepted or rejected by various countries”. The students were asked to collect information about this. One student from each group went to form a specific group where information was swapped in order to prepare a presentation to the ISS – Istituto Superiore di Sanità. Project Chemicals, the environment and us

16 The Liceo Classico "Virgilio“ in Rome Experience Strengths What is important in this kind of work is the opening of the school system to the outside world: presenting the work to the ISS meant making public the results of a project carried out in a school. Furthermore, in a group work carried out in co-operation the students must accept different points of view and let their own opinions be debated. This method allows also the acquisition of new knowledge by the three actors involved: teachers, who are no longer the only co-ordinators of the group work; students, who become active subjects in learning, the experts, in this case from the ISS, who will popularize the issues interacting with their counterparts. Opportunities By adopting this teaching method the evaluation results tend to improve since group study and making the students more responsible becomes more productive. Furthermore, it introduces elements of active teaching such as a brief discussion at the end of lesson on how a specific issue was understood. Another positive side to this is the choice of topics strongly linked with real life which develop the so called “cognitive conflict” and only through this students will have real motivation to learn.

17 Project Chemicals, the environment and us Experimentation in class: The Liceo Classico “Ruggero Settimo” in Caltanissetta Experience CALTANISSETTA

18 Project Chemicals, the environment and us The Liceo Classico “Ruggero Settimo” in Caltanissetta Experience The purpose of this project was to engage them in an autonomous PBL research work, participation to the meeting with the ISS where they explained to other students, teachers and researchers through a cd, the results of their research. The objectives were the following: -improve the training offer through a new interest towards the problems concerning the environment; -acquisition of a mentality open to doubt, questions and research as well as the development of reading. The method used by PBL was an issue we tiled “How to fight diseases without causing disasters” which posed many questions. Each class was divided into three groups and carried out the researched prompt by curiosity. It took about three months to finish and the close co-operation made the task pleasant and without problems. The hours were borrowed from science, Italian, law and computer science classes.

19 Project Chemicals, the environment and us The Liceo Classico “Ruggero Settimo” in Caltanissetta Experience Strengths Students’ opinion The project has encouraged: a new way of working; a higher level of interest and commitment by the students; a higher level of co-operation and exchange of ideas among the students; the ability to recognize what is useful to the project and what is not; individual work; development of analysis and processing skills; gain a method that can be used both at school and outside. Criticalities Negative aspects pointed out by the students difficulty in organizing work; risk to loose sight of the real problem; difficulty in processing the information collected. Threads Negative aspects pointed out by the students difficulty in finding information; little time

20 Project Chemicals, the environment and us The Liceo Classico “Ruggero Settimo” in Caltanissetta Experience Opportunities Students’ point of view This has been a positive experience since the methods has allowed us to select from a vast quantity of information what we consider useful; the splitting into groups had brought a higher level of co-operation and exchange of ideas. Form a teaching point of view we have increased our competences both in scientific and in computer fields. Teachers’ point of view From the final results we can no doubt affirm that there has been an improvement in teaching proposals by the school, but notwithstanding the great quantity of work carried out, our sensitiveness, attention and availability towards the students and the fact that the issues were dealt with rigorously with a vast quantity of information, only in the future we will be able to assess the effective advantages received by the students who have constantly shown great enthusiasm. The students have taken a friendly attitude and during their work have also strengthened their “esprit de corp”, attention and interest. Their participation to a meeting of results presentation in Rome has been the occasion to get to know each other and to exchange views with their colleagues from other schools who were also attending.

21 Other opinions concerning the initiative Table 1 – Teacher’s opinion on PBL PositiveNegative Allows to face the problem without specific knowledge and in autonomy Difficulty in applying the method to all subjects Stronger involvementThe risk of giving wrong or unspecific information because of helping Use of diverse sources of informationLittle time available Work groupLack of suitable tools Greater motivation to study compared to the traditional method Difficulty in organising Greater flexibility in debatesDifficulty in collecting and selecting information from different sources Increasing analysis and processing abilities Gain a method that can be used both at school and in other situations

22 Other opinions concerning the initiative Table 2 – Teacher’s opinion on PBL PositiveNegative Opportunity to experiment and use new research method and widen one’s own knowledge Difficulty in the first steps of the project caused by limited knowledge It stimulates work group It allows freedom in organising the work It gives a better ability to re-elaborate and present It gives the ability to work in new social contexts.

23 Italian Good Practices Let’s go on now with other examples… of approaches to make science studies more attractive

24 Italian Good Practices Ministry plan: “Teaching experimental science” Brief description MIUR has been implementing for some years now a project to develop scientific and technological education. The organizations that participate to the project are: 3 teachers’ associations of experimental science studies - AIF (Physics), ANISN (Natural science), DD - SCI (Chemistry); the Museum of Science and Technology of Milan and the City of Science of Naples; the last two have been promoting teaching experimentation involving hundreds of thousands students and teachers offering a vast range of lab activities as well as shared work in new practices within national and international projects on formal and informal education. The trainer/teacher use hypertexts and multimedia tools as follows: - contents, lab tables and on-the-field activities, identification keys, glossaries all supporting the cultural experience previously acquired. They could also be disciplinary and transversal studies linked to the students’ experiences and with other literary subjects. - teaching contents to overcome obstacles to learning, structural concepts of teaching, conceptual experience network; theory of knowledge. - contents focusing on teaching media. The teacher will define the necessary conditions for experience acquisition, the methods to hold a conversation with children and young people in class in order to understand their learning difficulties and find ways to overcome these problems.

25 Italian Good Practices Ministry plan: “Teaching experimental science” STRENGHTS The cultural and teaching foundation of the plan is based on a continuous communication and cooperation process between subjects with a common vision: the improvement of science education in schools. The development of a science education curriculum outlined by: -a strong vertical set up of the programme in all primary and secondary schools: -continuity/integration with other fields of study; -cultural and social relevance in scientific learning; -importance of learning experiences for students; -historical view of the development of science studies -integration with Maths and ITC. OPPORTUNI TIES The objectives of the first step are the following: - experimentation and validation of a non-stop training method for teachers based on the cohesive action of the territorial structures, as permanent resource centers, with integrated training and self-teaching, also through the use of internet; - experimentation and validation of teaching material for teachers and students; - development of low-cost innovative labs; - firsthand assistance to experimentation; - develop tools to assess the validity of new learning itineraries in science (lab activities, visits to science centres and structures of environmental interest, etc).

26 Italian Good Practices PROJECT: ENISCUOLA Brief description Eniscuola is a joint project between Eni and Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei which began in the year 2000 to give young people the information needed to familiarize with the world of energy and the environment, and to prompt eco-sustainable behavior through multimedia tools, interaction and the use of internet. Eni Scuola has become a reference point at national level thanks to its joint action with regional school authorities and the direct contact with primary and secondary schools and is well known for its past history in the fields of energy and the environment. Furthermore, Eni Scuola participates to the most important Italian scientific and cultural venues and is supported by many international organisations such as UNESCO and EU. Its activities are shown in the website (in Italian and English): documents, diagrams, tables and didactic quizzes, video-interviews with Italian and international experts, games designed to discover the world of energy and the environment – about 1000 pages with texts and images, 3 million diagrams and reports. During 2007 almost 4 million pages were spread over more than 100 countries; students logged on the website for an insight of topics regarding energy and the environment through the e-learning platform.

27 ENISCUOLA The portal (in Italian and in English)www.eniscuola.net DEVELOPED LEARNING PATHS

28 ENISCUOLA The portal (in Italian and in English)www.eniscuola.net Multimedia tools, on-line tests and experiments, video, quiz, mp3 files...

29 Strengths The e-learning platform was developed by the Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei for the project "Energy and the Environment in Schools", based on the fact that non-stop development in communication technology has brought new education models. The platform is easily accessible, well organised, clear, composed of solid scientific documentation, flexible and well supported. The courses deal with energy and environment problems through the use of multimedia material and texts as teaching tools and means of scientific dissemination. The courses now available are 6 and will be implemented during the year and divided into different levels of difficulty. Opportunities In 2007 the project promoted sustainable growth in schools supplying them with teaching tools based on ICT. Under the teacher’s supervision the students improved their knowledge of problems regarding the environment and acquired a deeper insight of those affecting our planet as well as those involving more specific local situations. ENISCUOLA

30 Italian Good Practices Swedish Software HAVE PHUN An example of software for simulations Brief description Free multiplatform (Windows, Linux, OSX), in Italian, a simulating physics playground explaining the laws of Physics with a selection of tools to draw and animate realistic or fantastic machines. Phun, in which the word “fun” is combined with Physics was developed in a Swedish university as a thesis for a master course and is an application for creating 2D simulations of physics. It has a cartoony feel to it and is simple and fun to use. You can design anything, from a brick falling from above to a kite conveyor belt. Main Objectives: To make physics fun. To promote interest in science and technology among kids, youth, students and most likely adults too. A high level of interactivity and a simple and efficient interface that encourages creativity and exploration (this is why 2D was chosen over 3D) rather than efficiency and usage patterns influenced by the tool To enable learning using a constructionist approach To use fast and stable cutting-edge methods for multi-physics simulation and solvers

31 HAVE PHUN - Here you are a demo!

32 Italian Good Practices Let’s go on with some local examples of good practices UMBRIA REGION

33 Umbrian Good Practices Name & Surname: DANIELA AMBROSI Andress/Nation: via del Bucaccio, Perugia/ Italy Profession: Teacher Role in the initiative/project: stakeholders of project Brief description LIMTE K/T ( Bottacione’s GORGE) From macroscpic to miscroscopic. Interessed subjects: Sedimentology and Micropaleonthology. Two depositional unit confronted in space and in time Adopted methodology An example of a study about a deposition unit: from macro to micro. An example of recostruction starting from information extracted from the analysis. clast’s origin,tipes,mode,time of forces that have influenced it. Visit to the place and to the University of Perugia, science department. Questions: What kind of environment was this?why? How could you date a sedimentary rock? What is a fossil? What does KT means? How could be a mass extinction? SWOT ANALYSIS STRENGHTSCarry out a cooperative research,collect and analize scientific information to confirm a theory, visit important geological places, know better the territory, keep in touch with university teachers and researchers, understand actual problems about research. CRITICALITIESGeleocical sites visit’s cost,time request, lack of a mineralogy microscope. Involve other subject’s teachers OPPORTUNITI ES Keep in touch with university teachers, understand important actual problems,know better the territory and also understand the connection between macroscopic and microscopic. THREATSFind proper spaces to the work’s presentation

34 Umbrian Good Practices Name & Surname: DANIELA AMBROSI Andress/Nation: via del Bucaccio, Perugia/ Italy Profession: Teacher Role in the initiative/project: stakeholders of project Brief description ECOSCIENCE To make students and teachers aware of environmental saving, suggest changing in the school to increase ecological actions, make a presentation which collect all the results of them researches and experiments, and show it in public. Adopted methodology The students will be organized in groups to understand some opposite aspects about: a) Greenhouse effect causes b) Possibility of using alternative energies Research and use scientific information and graphs, go on step by step and answer to the following questions: Greenhouse effect: Is it a friend or a enemy? Does exist clean energies? Use of chemistry and physics laboratory SWOT ANALYSIS STRENGHTSSolve a research in a cooperative way, organize two groups to collect and analize scientific information useful to confirm a specific theory; perform a professional role in a simulated scientific discussion. How could we save the ambient? CRITICALITIESStudents could have prejudices, it is a political problem, long time required. OPPORTUNITIESInterdisciplinary work, italian,biology, physics, use of multimedia technologies, use of TIC, creation of a multimedia product

35 Umbrian Good Practices Name & Surname: DANIELA AMBROSI Andress/Nation: via del Bucaccio, Perugia/ Italy Profession: Teacher Role in the initiative/project: stakeholders of project Brief description WHO IS THE MURDERER? Learn chemistry ability and competences showing how this subject is in everyday life, in particular chemistry applied in forensic science and criminology, encourage the student’s curiosity beginning from their interests Adopted methodology Teaching in laboratory, seminars and conferences, a visit to university and\or RIS in Rome. One group should create a simulation of a murder with a story board and a short film added, the other group should solve the problem. Both groups should use the information, learned before, to create proof and understand it answering to the following questions: Who is the murderer? Whose finger prints are this? Are they recent or old? Has the murderer used some poison or drugs? SWOT ANALYSIS STRENGHTSChemistry as a comprehension tool of reality. Use the student’s preferred films or serials. Encourage the teamwork and an ideas exchange, use concept like redox-base and acid- chemical equilibrium, color and structure of a precipitation reaction applied to reality. Involve the ability to formulate hypothesis. Solve scientifically a criminal problem CRITICALITIESEquip the school laboratory for making chemical experiments, trips cost, time necessary to realize a short film, use afternoon after the school’s timetable OPPORTUNITIESInterdisciplinary work, Italian, biology, physics, use of multimedia technologies, creation of a short film or of a performance

36 Umbrian Good Practices Name & Surname: Francesca Vergine Address/Nation: Perugia-Italia (or other Profession; teacher Liceo Scientifico Statale "G.Galilei" Perugia Role in the initiative/project: co-ordinator Brief description MINERAL WATER IS BETTER THAN TAP WATER The activity aim comes from the water emergency that all the planet must face and that it places everybody we in front of the necessity of seeing our behaviours and habits again. The class has divided the a supportive of water in bottle and one the other one into two groups in favor of the tap water consumption. The two groups, at home, have collected information on the subject and trained a process. At school, in the chemistry lab analyses were conducted on water. Subsequently, in the classroom, in three sessions, each group, through its spokesman, has given evidence in favour of their choice: at this stage the teacher played the role of judge. The judgement in favour of consumption of water from the tap, was accepted by all as a natural consequence of evidence concluding that the iperconsumo of mineral water is based on an almost total lack of information and good dose of prejudices. SWOT ANALYSIS STRENGHTSExercise analysis: port to break the complex problems and to address issues that are considered crucial and resolvable with the resources available. Exercise design: is the synthesis which brings together information provided by the analysis, logical division of labour between the components of the group, reconnaissance of resources, scanning phases and tasks, compared to times and dates, use of information technology. OPPORTUNITIE S Progressive autonomy of student Ability to work as a team Observance of roles Able to speak in public THREATS Need to organise programmes curriculum in less time

37 Umbrian Good Practices Name & Surname: Paola Arcaleni Address/Nation: Perugia-Italia Profession SSIS Supervisor at the University of Perugia. Role in the initiative/project:author Brief description CHEMISTRY IN THE COLORS AND TRANSFORMATION Life Science was introduced as supplementary discipline in the curricular plan of Scientific PNI course of IIS “L. Da Vinci” (a 1 hour period each week) in the first classes. The teachers of Natural Sciences Department suggested the module “Science in laboratory” to realize continuity with lower secondary school beginning and to develop the scientific area. The teaching committee adopted these choice according to the rules on scholastic autonomy with regard to “research, experimentation and development”. The “Chemistry in the colors and transformations” was performed in the 2nd classes as an action of the micro curriculum “The sun colors” planned by the primary, lower and upper secondary schools (“Alta valle del Tevere” group, ISS plan, object: the matter) Adopted methodolog y Brain storming (based on common sense and daily experiences) and problem posing (What is a transformation? What is colour? Which colour do you prefer?What colours do you observe in your kitchen and your diet? The synthetic and natural colours are the same?), PBL, debate/discussion lessons, group works, simple laboratory experiences and poor materials (vegetables and fruits; coloured pens, pastels..), worksheets, experimental notebook, online searching and learning, documentation and narrative methodology. SWOT ANALYSIS STRENGHTS continuity with the primary and lower secondary development of the scientific area autonomy about research, experimentation and development students active participation and motivation in learning processes opportunities for students' success CRITICALITIES some difficulties to perform the activities according to the curricular programs the students do not perceive laboratory experiences to be particularly important in their learning OPPORTUNITIES implementation of a fruitful cooperation with the territorial educational institutions (school network) to carry out and to validate a Natural Science vertical curriculum teacher professional development to become effective in science teaching THREATS limitations in resources (budget, human resources, access to appropriate technology tools)

38 Umbrian Good Practices Name & Surname: Paola Arcaleni Address/Nation: Perugia-Italia Profession SSIS Supervisor at the University of Perugia. Role in the initiative/project:author Brief description ADVANCED BIOTECHNOLOGIES AND BIOETHICS COURSE “Bioethics and advanced biotechnologies” were introduced as new disciplines into the curricular programs since the scholastic year, coherently with the rules about scholastic autonomy. Three modules were carried out: 1. Embryonic development, cloning, artificial reproduction – from ethics to bioethics 2. Advanced biotechnologies and medicine – confronting bioethics: open issues and problems 3. Advanced biotechnologies, nutrition, environment – ethics, nature and future generations These modules were performed during the 3th, 4th, 5th years of curricula, each period lasting 30 hours (science: 20 hours; philosophy/religion. 10 hours) by curricular and extracurricular activities. Adopted methodology Brain storming, traditional lectures, PBL (Problem Based Learning as: What is evolution? What about Homo species evolution? What is a chimera? What is biodiversity? How molecular markers can be used to investigate biodiversity, Which fruit do you prefer? And what about its origin?.....), debate/discussion lessons, group works, textbooks, review, print publications, instructional video, print publications, workshops, conferences, seminars, and study tours, molecular experiments, online searching and learning. These activities were carried out with the help of external experts, thus increasing territorial contacts. SWOT ANALYSIS STRENGHTSdidactical autonomy (modularity/flexibility) autonomy about research, experimentation and development widening the formative supply (implementation of actions and activities taking into account the needs of the cultural, social and economic context of local situations) multidisciplinarity / interdisciplinarity students active participation and motivation in learning processes opportunities for students' success CRITICALITIESlimited budget / some difficulties to perform the activities according to curricular programs OPPORTUNITIESto carry out activities with external collaborations (research, institutional, other formative agencies, professional categories, environmental association, school networks...) thus increasing territorial contacts. THREATSlimited and unsuitable technique resources (tools, laboratories, experimental instruments, technicians)

39 Umbrian Good Practices A Central Experimental Sciences Laboratory was opened in Foligno in the early 1960s. Initially it was intended to be a place providing refresher courses for lab technicians working in high school laboratories, and it later became the location for refresher courses provided for teachers of scientific subjects at national level. Over time it acquired significant amounts and types of laboratories, equipment and materials for chemistry, biology, general physics, optics, acoustics, geography and geology; there is also a botanical garden and a meeting room with a videoconferencing system. In recent years, the Laboratory has been used by Foligno Municipality schools and only thanks to the enthusiasm and volunteer dedication of several teachers. Experimental Sciences Laboratory in Foligno

40 Umbrian Good Practices The Laboratory’s chief activities are: - Support and experimentation in chemistry, biology, physics, mathematics, botany; - Astronomy workshops; -Training of teachers and scholastic operators. The Experimental Sciences Laboratory has also drawn up in particular the following project, experimenting simulations and games: "The Meteorology Workshop" "Technologies of information and communication for teaching science subjects“ "Science in Schools"

41 Umbrian Good Practices Inaugurated in December 2003, POST Science Centre - Science and Technology Centre in Perugia represents the permanent point of reference in Umbria where you can explore the universe of scientific culture in an interactive way. Thanks to the fun animations, the scientific exhibitions and the numerous didactic activities organized, the POST has become a hinge and base for activities that promote Science. POST Science Centre Science and Technology Centre in Perugia Playing, observing and understanding Science together

42 Umbrian Good Practices These activities are not only carried out in schools, but also in libraries and other public spaces. The Centre was set up with the University of Perugia. Inside the Science Center, young people who have a strong passion for science and experiments can find the ideal atmosphere to develop their own interests and their own abilities by participating as animators in various activities or planning the themes of didactic applications. The Centre is made up of an interactive exhibition space in which the public can be in contact and familiarize themselves with the themes and techniques of Science and Technology in a fun way. POST Science Centre

43 Umbrian Good Practices The three sections that make up the exhibition area are: EXHIBITION ZONE How is sound transmitted? How does the brain process the information that surrounds us? What has making soap bubbles have to do with architecture and engineering? To help visitors answer these questions, there are interactive exhibits and installations that allow visitors to experience some natural phenomenon personally. GALLERY OF IMAGES An area in which there are temporary exhibitions. DIDACTIC CLASSROOM In this room experiments are conducted to find innovative didactic solutions. POST Science Centre

44 Thank you for your kind attention! Istanbul II Project Meeting This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. EUCLIDES – Enhancing the Use of Cooperative Learning to Increase Development of Science studies LLL IT-COMENIUS-CMP


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