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Outreach & Social Inclusion Ann Stewart National co-convenor EOPHEA Director, The Equity Office. The University of Queensland.

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Presentation on theme: "Outreach & Social Inclusion Ann Stewart National co-convenor EOPHEA Director, The Equity Office. The University of Queensland."— Presentation transcript:

1 Outreach & Social Inclusion Ann Stewart National co-convenor EOPHEA Director, The Equity Office. The University of Queensland

2 Overview Outreach in Australian universities Low SES & social exclusion Current challenges Emerging model Concluding statements

3 Development of outreach in Australian universities – a brief background 1950s – post war. Menzies govt. Extensive scholarships & means-tested financial support. Encourage returned servicemen to uni & boost national educational level – related to national productivity. 1970s - Whitlam govt. Social justice agenda. Uni fees abolished & means tested education allowances.

4 s – Hawke govt. A Fair Chance for All (Dawkins). –Designated equity (disadvantaged) groups –Under-representation related to proportion of population. –HEEP funding introduced - universities implemented schemes to increase participation. Reporting requirements. –HECS introduced –Equity Scholarships provided

5 Under Howard govt. –HECS substantially increased –HEESP (increased funding) –Re-introduction of Commonwealth scholarships –HECS - HELP, FEE-HELP Under Rudd govt.  Increased number Commonwealth scholarships  ‘Sorry’ speech  Focus on social inclusion  National Centre for Student Equity, and??? Equity priorities remain essentially the same - emphasis on access for Indigenous Australians and Low SES

6 Why do outreach? International competitiveness National productivity Skilled workforce Social justice (values) Social cohesion Educated populace – citizenship Harness intellectual capital Reduction costs: welfare, criminal activity, health

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8 Outreach & Low SES 1990 onwards Traditional model: focus on schools in designated disadvantaged areas. –Equity scholarships, bursaries, grants – Mentoring & ambassador programs –Alternative entry pathways –Role models –Information events –School visits –Campus visits –Linked transition support programs –And so on…..

9 What did all this do? Some improvement in numbers of women in non-traditional areas and postgraduate studies (much of this improvement for high SES women), and NESB groups (but significant analysis still required to ascertain differences between ethnic groupings, and intersection with gender). But… Virtually NO change in other groupings

10 Access share by socio-economic group (per cent) James et al 2004

11 Figure 1: Low SES Access 1997 – 2006 Australian National data [1][1]

12 Challenges Students turned off by Year 10 Subject choices not OP Misconceptions about: – university study –value of university education Parents disaffected with education (Parents most influence on post school choices) Current Context –Attraction of TAFE or employment –cost University is nothing to do with people like us!

13 Something new is needed! Insanity: doing the same thing over and over again and expecting a different result

14 New Message University is a realistic option for people like ‘us’ –some time in our lives! BUT HOW DO WE EFFECT THIS LONG TERM, CULTURE SHIFT?

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17 A revisioned outreach National visionary leadership Locally contextualised Long term commitment Sustainable reciprocal relationships with community groups Collaboration between stakeholder groups Many challenges to overcome Exciting possibilities for innovation & reduction of duplication


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