Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING Prof. Ranjan Kumar Bal Utkal University.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING Prof. Ranjan Kumar Bal Utkal University."— Presentation transcript:

1 FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING Prof. Ranjan Kumar Bal Utkal University

2 What is Common? Kumar Mangalam Birla Indra Nooyi Osama Bin Laden
Lakshmi Niwas Mittal Kumar Mangalam Birla Indra Nooyi Osama Bin Laden

3 COURSE OUTLINE: F.A. Conceptual Knowledge Mechanics
Financial Statements Analysis & Decision Making

4 F. A.: WHY TO READ ? Personal Life Professional Life An Investment for Future Strategy

5 BUSINESS ORGANISATIONS
Merchandising (Trading) Organisations Manufacturing Organisations Service Organisations Business organisations are cash machines.

6 BUSINESS ORGANISATIONS
Private Limited Company Public Limited Company Limited Liability Partnership

7 ACCOUNTING IS THE LANGUAGE OF BUSINESS.
Serves as a means of communication Communicates / reports the events

8 Anthony & Reece: “Accounting is not exactly a foreign language; the problem of learning it is more like that of an American learning to speak English as it is spoken in Great Britain.” “Language evolve and change in response to the changing needs of society, and so does Accounting.”

9 ACCOUNTING IS AN INFORMATION SYSTEM
INPUT (Raw Data) SYSTEM PROCESSES (Men & Equipment) OUT PUT (Reports & Information)

10 OUTPUTS Financial Statements Tax Returns Managerial Data and Reports Special Reports

11 USERS OF ACCOUNTING INFORMATION
Management Shareholders and Investors Lenders Creditors Employees Customers Govt. and Regulatory Agencies General Public Others: Media, Consumer Organizations, Researchers & Analysts, etc.

12 EVOLUTION OF ACCOUNTING
Stewardship Accounting Financial Accounting Cost Accounting Management Accounting Financial Accounting Vs. Managerial Accounting

13 DEFINITIONS AAA: AICPA:
“Accounting is the process of identifying, measuring and communicating economic information to permit informed judgments and decisions by the users of information.” AICPA: “Accounting is the art of recording, classifying and summarizing in a significant manner and in terms of money, transactions and events which are in part, at least of a financial character and interpreting the results thereof.”

14 Analyzing & Interpreting Communicating
FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING Recording Classifying Summarizing Analyzing & Interpreting Communicating

15 OBJECTIVES : F.A. To keep systematic records. To ascertain the net effects of the business operations. To ascertain the financial position of the organisations. To provide accounting information to interested parties.

16 ACCOUNTING PRINCIPLES
Principles to be observed at the recording stage Accounting Entity Money Measurement Objective Evidence Dual Aspect Realisation Cost Accrual Principles to be observed at the reporting stage Going concern Accounting Period Matching Conservative Consistency Materiality Full Disclosure

17 CASH BASIS Vs. ACCRUAL BASIS OF ACCOUNTING
Accounting Framework: Includes GAAP on the basis of which accounting data is processed, analyzed and reported.

18 GAAP A set of concepts, conventions, rules, and procedures
Accepted by accountants over a period of time Guides in the preparation and presentation of financial reports

19 ACCOUNTING STANDARDS Specifies acceptable accounting methods
Uniformity Harmonization ASB of the ICAI – AS Vs. Ind AS IASB - IFRS FASB

20 Assets = Liabilities Equity + Liabilities = Assets ACCOUNTING EQUATION
Economic Resources = Sources of Resources or Claims. Assets = Liabilities Equity + Liabilities = Assets

21 Analysing the Effects of Business Transactions.
Investment by Owner Receipt of Loan Purchase of Office Equipment ASSETS Cash Rs.12,000 Equipments Rs.58,000 70,000 EQUITY & LIABILITIES Creditors Rs.20,000 Suresh, Equity 50,000 70,000

22 BALANCE SHEET as at 31st March, 2011
LIABILITIES Share Capital Reserve and Surplus Secured Loans Unsecured Loans Current Liabilities and Provisions ASSETS Fixed Assets Investments Current Assets And Loans & Advances Miscellaneous Expenditures Profit & Loss A/C

23 BALANCE SHEET as at 31st March, 2011
SOURCES OF FUNDS Shareholders’ Fund Loan Funds APPLICATION OF FUNDS Fixed Assets Investments Current Assets, Loans & Advances Less Current Liabilities & Provision Miscellaneous Expenditure

24 BALANCE SHEET as at 31st March, 2012
EQUITY AND LIABILITIES Note No. Current Previous Shareholders’ Fund Share Application Money pending allotment Non-current Liabilities Current Liabilities ASSETS Non-current Assets Fixed Assets Non-current Investments Deferred Tax Assets (net) Long term loans and advances Other non-current assets Current Assets Current Investments Inventories Trade receivables Cash and cash equivalents Short-term loans and advances Other current assets

25 PROFIT & LOSS A/C for the year ending 31st March 2011.
I Income II. Expenditure III. Profit before Tax IV. Provision for Taxation V. Profit after Tax VI. Balance b/f from last year VII. Profit available for appropriation Appropriations: Dividends, Reserves VIII. Balance transferred to Balance Sheet

26 PROFIT & LOSS STATEMENT for the year ending 31st March 2012
I Revenue from operations II. Other income III. Total Revenue IV. Expenses ……………. V. Profit before exceptional and extraordinary items and tax VI. Exceptional Items VII. Profit before extraordinary items and tax Extraordinary items Profit before tax Tax expense: Current tax, Deferred tax Profit/(loss) for the period from continuing operations Profit/(loss) from discontinuing operations Tax expense of discontinuing operations Profit/(loss) from discontinuing operations (after tax) Profit/(loss) for the period Earnings per equity share: Basic, Diluted

27 CASH FLOW STATEMENT for the period ending on March 31, 2012
Cash flow from operating activities Cash flow from investing activities Cash flow from financing activities Net cash increase (decrease) in cash & CE Cash & CE at beginning of the period Cash & CE at the end of the period.

28 FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND REPORTS
PRODUCT MARKET FORCES Competitors, Customers CAPITAL MARKET FORCES Investors, Lenders FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND REPORTS REGULATORY FORCES Government, Securities Regulator LABOUR MARKET FORCES Managers, Employees

29 LIMITATIONS OF FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Vegetable Accounting Focus on past / historical data Postmortem Analysis Ignore non-financial information Ignore HR Fails to provide all information to stake-holders for their decision making

30 QUALITATIVE CHARACTERISTICS OF FINANCIAL STATEMENTS.
Relevance Reliability Understandability Comparability Consistency Neutrality Materiality Timeliness Verifiability Prudence

31 RECORDING BUSINESS TRANSACTIONS
Accounts Ledger Chart of Accounts: Assets Liabilities Shareholders’ Equity Revenues Expenses

32 DOUBLE ENTRY SYSTEM Luca Pacioli – 1494 Dual Aspect Debit & Credit

33 ANY ASSET / EXPENSE ACCOUNT
LEDGER ‘T’ Account : A Ledger account in simplified form. TITLE OF ACCOUNT Left or Debit side Right or Credit side ANY ASSET / EXPENSE ACCOUNT (Debit) (Credit) Increase Decrease

34 ANY LIABILITY / OWNER’S EQUITY / REVENUE ACCOUNT
Ledger ANY LIABILITY / OWNER’S EQUITY / REVENUE ACCOUNT (Debit) (Credit) Decrease Increase Standard Form of Accounts ANY ACCOUNT Date Explanation Ref Debit Credit Balance

35 JOURNAL GENERAL JOURNAL 2009 June 1 Cash 1,00.000
DATE ACCOUNT TITLE & EXPLANATION L.F DEBIT CREDIT Rs Rs. 2009 June 1 Cash ,00.000 Share Capital ,00,000 Invested Cash June 2 Office Equipment ,000 Cash ,000 Creditors ,000 Purchase of office equipment on part payment

36 SUB-DIVISION OF JOURNAL
Cash Book Purchases Journal Sales Journal Purchases Return Journal Sales Return Journal Bills Receivable Journal Bills Payable Journal Journal Proper

37 ADVANTAGES Classification of transactions Reference becomes easy
Facilitate division of work More particulars Responsibility can be fixed Facilitates checking

38 PURCHASES JOURNAL Date Name of the Supplier Invoice No. L.F. Amount Remarks

39 SALES JOURNAL Date Name of the Customer Out ward Invoice No L.F Amount Remarks

40 THREE COLUMN CASH BOOK Date Partic-ulars L.F. Disco-unt Allow-ed Rs.
Bank Disco-unt Rece-ived Rs.

41 BANK RECONCILATION Cash Book Vs. Pass Book
What is shown on the debit side of the Cash Book, appears on the credit side of the Customer’s A/c in Bank’s ledger and vice versa. OVERDRAFT: When cash book shows a credit balance or when pass book shows a debit balance.

42 CAUSES OF DIFFERENCE: Cheques issued but not yet presented for payment
Cheques deposited into the bank but not collected Bank charges Interest allowed by the bank, if any. Interest on overdraft. Amount collected by bank on standing instructions Payment made by bank as per standing instructions Direct payments into the bank made by customers Dishonor of cheques or bill Errors

43 BRS Rs. Rs. Balance as per cash Book Add: Items: 1, 4, 6, 8 Less:
Balance as per pass Book ***

44 TRIAL BALANCE To check arithmetical accuracy
Equality of Debits & Credits

45 LOCATING ERRORS A debit posted in an A/C as a credit or vice versa
An A/C balance incorrectly computed An A/C balance incorrectly recorded in TB A debit balance incorrectly recorded as credit balance in TB or vice versa A balance omitted entirely The TB incorrectly added Partial omission of an entry

46 ERRORS NOT DISCLOSED BY TB
Omission from Books of Accounts Recording at a wrong amount Compensating Errors Posting in correct side but wrong A/C Recording twice in subsidiary books Errors of Principle

47 CORRECTING ERRORS Correcting Entries Suspense Account

48 MEASURING BUSINESS INCOME
Profits: Life blood – survival & growth Accountants prefer the term “Net Profit” instead of “Income” NP = Revenues – Expenses Gains & Losses Accounting Period Accrual Accounting Matching principle

49 Measuring Income – Cont.
Adjustment process Outstanding Expense Prepaid Expense Accrued Income Income Received in Advance

50 CAPITAL AND REVENUE RULES: Items of revenue nature : Income Statement.
Items of Capital nature : Balance Sheet. NEEDS: Calculation of true Profit. Determination of true Financial Position.

51 Capital & Revenue – Cont.
CAPITAL EXPENDITURE Acquisition of F.A. Expenditure on F.A. to increase life Exp. On development of land or mines Cost of experiment: Patent Legal charges for F.A. REVENUE EXPENDITURE - Exp. on day-to-day conduct of business Exp. For buying goods Exp. For maintaining F.A. & Depreciation on F.A. Interest on Loan Regular legal charges

52 DEFERRED REVENUE EXPENDITURE
Exp. on advertisement for a new product Preliminary Expenses Brokerage & Underwriting Commission Cost of shifting plants to a new site

53 Capital & Revenue Receipts
CAPITAL RECEIPTS Capital introduced Loan received Sale proceeds of F.A. REVENUE RECEIPTS Sale proceeds of goods Other Income (Commission, Rent, Interest, etc)

54 PROFIT & LOSS A/C for the year ending 31st March 2012.
I Revenue from operations II. Other income III. Total Revenue IV. Expenses ……………. V. Profit before exceptional and extraordinary items and tax VI. Exceptional Items VII. Profit before extraordinary items and tax Extraordinary items Profit before tax Tax expense: Current tax, Deferred tax Profit/(loss) for the period from continuing operations Profit/(loss) from discontinuing operations Tax expense of discontinuing operations Profit/(loss) from discontinuing operations (after tax) Profit/(loss) for the period Earnings per equity share: Basic, Diluted

55 ACCOUNTING FOR MERCHANDISING TRANSACTIONS
Revenues from Sales Cost of Goods Sold Gross Profit = S – COGS Operating Expenses PBIT = GP – Op. Exp. PBT = PBIT – Int. Exp. NP = PBT – Income Tax

56 MERCHANDISING COMPANY
Classified P & L A/C Classified Balance Sheet

57 INVENTORIES Raw Materials WIP Finished Goods

58 Inventories Physical Inventory Pricing the Inventory
- Specific Identification - FIFO - LIFO - Weighted Average Cost

59 Inventories Conservatism Consistency Inventory Turnover

60 MANUFACTURING COMPANY
Cost of Goods Manufactured - Raw Material Consumed - Direct Labour - Manufacturing Overhead - WIP MANUFACTURING ACCOUNT

61 MANUFACTURING COMPANY
COGS - Finished Goods: Opening - Cost of Goods Manufactured - Cost of Goods Available for Sale - Finished Goods: Closing

62 FIXED ASSETS Investment in Long-lived Assets
Source of Future Revenue Potential Fixed Assets Vs. Current Assets Intention TANGIBLE Vs. INTANGIBLE Natural Resources

63 ACQUISITION OF F.A. Cost: Purchase price, Duties & taxes on purchase, and Directly attributable cost Purchase price: After Trade Discount & Rebates Directly Attributable Cost: Registration fees, Lawyer’s fees, Brokerage, Freight, Installation cost, Professional fees, Pre-production exp.

64 F.A. Capitalisation of borrowing costs – Directly attributable
Stop capitalisation: When the F.A. is complete & ready for use Basket Purchases: Fair Values – Professional valuers – L. & B. Donated Assets: AS 20 – Grant & Asset – Recorded at fair value or nominal value Self-constructed Assets: Costs attributable

65 DEPRECIATION Depreciation represents the expired portion of the cost of an asset. Depreciation and Depletion Depreciation and Amortization Depreciation and Obsolescence Depreciation and Fluctuation

66 CAUSES Wear and Tear Lapse of Time Obsolescence Depletion

67 OBJECTIVES OF PROVIDING DEPRECIATION
Ascertaining the true profit Ascertaining the true cost of production Presentation of true financial position Funds for replacement of assets

68 FACTORS INFLUENCEING DEPRECIATION
Cost of the asset Estimated working life Estimated scrap/residual/salvage value Depreciable Base = Cost – (Residual value – Cost of disposal)

69 DEPRECIATION METHODS Fixed Installment Method or Straight-line Method:
Depreciation (p.a.) = (C – S) / N 2. Written-down-Value Method or Diminishing Balance Method: Depreciation Rate = 1- (Residual value / Cost)1/n

70 SPECIAL PROBLEMS Depreciation for partial periods
Revision of depreciation rates Assets of low unit costs Changing the depreciation method Group depreciation Depreciation for Income Tax Disposal of F.A. Revaluation of F.A.

71 INTANGIBLE ASSETS Amortisation of I.A. Goodwill Brands R. & D. costs
Computer software costs Deferred costs IMPAIRMENT OF ASSETS Impairment Loss = Carrying Amt. – Recoverable Amt.

72 Wasting Assets - Depletion
NATURAL RESOURCES Wasting Assets - Depletion

73 LIABILITIES Obligations for future payment Current Vs. Long-term
Secured Vs. Unsecured Contingent liabilities

74 CURRENT LIABILITIES Definite liabilities Vs. Estimated liabilities
Trade Creditors Bills Payable VAT Payable Current portions of Long-term Debt Accrued Liabilities Unearned Revenues

75 Estimated Liabilities
Provision Income Tax Product Warranties Dividends Payable

76 LONG-TERM LIABILITIES
Debentures or Bonds Lease Liabilities Pension Liabilities Deferred Tax Liabilities

77 DEBENTURES Secured & Unsecured Registered & Unregistered Term & Serial
Convertible Callable bonds Zero-coupon bonds Debenture Rating Debenture issued at a Premium/Discount

78 SHAREHOLDERS’ EQUITY Share Capital Dividends Authorised Capital
Issued, Subscribed & Paid-up Capital Par Value or Face Value Dividends

79 Accounting for Share Capital
Issue at par Issue at premium Issue for non-cash assets Rights Issue Forfeiture of Shares

80 PREFERENCE SHARE Cumulative & Non-cumulative
Participating & Non-participating Redeemable & Non-redeemable Convertible & Non-convertible

81 RESERVES Capital Reserve & Revenue Reserve Share Premium
Capital Redemption Reserve Debenture Redemption Reserve Investment Allowance Reserve APPROPRIATIONS

82 Buy-back of Shares Bonus Shares Stock-based Compensation EPS

83 CASH FLOW STATEMENT Shows the historical changes in Cash & CE
During a particular period Operating, Investing & Financing activities

84 C.F.S. – Benefits Ability to generate Cash & CE
Needs to utilise cash flows Assess Liquidity & Solvency Indicator of future cash flow Relationship: Profitability & Net Cash Flow

85 Cash Flow from Operating Activities-Direct
Cash receipts from Customers Cash paid to Suppliers & Employees Cash generated from Operation - Income taxes paid Cash flow before Extra-ordinary items - Extra-ordinary items Net cash from Operating Activities

86 Cash Flow from Operating Activities-Indirect
N.P. before Tax & Extra-ordinary item Adjustments for: Depreciation Foreign Exchange Loss Interest & Dividend Income Interest Expense Op. Profit before W.C. changes Changes in S. Drs. & Inventory Changes in S. Crs. Cash generated from Operation Income Taxes paid Cash flow before Extra-ordinary item Extra-ordinary Items Net Cash from Operating Activities

87 Cash Flow from Investing Activities
Purchase of Fixed Assets Sale of F.A. Purchase of other Investments Sale of other Investments Interest Received Dividend Received Net cash from(used in) Investing Activities

88 Cash Flow from Financing Activities
Proceeds from issue of Share Capital Proceeds from Long-term Borrowings Repayments of Long-term Borrowing Interest Paid Dividend Paid Net Cash from(used in) Financing Activities

89 CASH FLOW STATEMENT Cash flow from operating activities
Cash flow from investing activities Cash flow from financing activities Net cash increase(decrease) in cash & CE Cash & CE at beginning of the period Cash & CE at the end of the period.

90 BALANCE SHEET. (Figures in Lakhs). LIABILITIES AND EQUITY
BALANCE SHEET (Figures in Lakhs) LIABILITIES AND EQUITY March 31, March 31, 2011 Share capital Reserves Profit and Loss balance Long-term borrowings Current liabilities Provisions for tax Proposed dividend TOTAL ASSETS Gross fixed assets Less: Accumulated depreciation Net fixed assets Investment (all long-term) Inventories Debtors Cash and bank balance Loans and advances TOTAL

91 PROFIT AND LOSS STATEMENT FOR THE YEAR ENDED MARCH 31, 2012 INCOME
PROFIT AND LOSS STATEMENT FOR THE YEAR ENDED MARCH 31, INCOME (Figures in Lakhs) Sales Other income Stock adjustment Total EXPENDITURE Raw materials consumed Manufacturing expenses Administration expenses Selling and distribution expenses Depreciation Interest Total Profit before tax (PBT) Provision for tax Profit after tax (PAT) Profit and loss balance at the beginning of the year 125 Profit available for appropriation Transfer to reserves Proposed dividend (including dividend tax) 55 Balance of profit carried to balance sheet i. Loans and advance include income tax paid Rs.120 lakhs (previous year Rs.75 lakhs). Ii. During , 5,00,000 equity shares of Rs.10 each were issued at par. Iii. Long-term loan Rs.30 lakhs repaid during the year. Long term loan raised during the years Rs.80 lakhs. Prepare Cash flow statement.

92 FINANCIAL STATEMENT ANALYSIS
OBJECTIVES Liquidity Solvency Profitability Efficiency Health & Performance PROCESS Select Relate Evaluate

93 STANDARDS OF COMPARISONS
Rule-of-thumb Past Performance Industry Standards

94 SOURCES OF INFORMATION
Company Reports Stock Exchanges Business Periodicals Information Services

95 TECHNIQUES OF FSA Horizontal Analysis Trend Analysis Vertical Analysis
Ratio Analysis

96 RATIO ANALYSIS Profitability Ratios Liquidity Ratios Solvency Ratios
Capital Market Ratios

97 LIQUIDITY RATIOS Current Ratio Quick Ratio Debtor Turnover
Inventory Turnover

98 SOLVENCY RATIOS Debt-to-Equity Ratio Interest Coverage Ratio

99 CAPITAL MARKET RATIOS Price-Earnings Ratio Dividend Yield Price-to-Book Ratio

100 PROFITABILITY RATIOS Profit Margin Asset Turnover
Return on Assets or ROI Return on Equity EPS

101 Financial Reports / Special Reports
CORPORATE DISCLOSURE Annual Reports Financial Reports / Special Reports

102 ANNUAL REPORTS To inform the Share Holders: Performance & Health
To provide information to other users

103 Annual Report: Contents
Chairman’s Report Directors’ Report Auditor’s Report Profit & Loss Statement Balance Sheet Cash Flow Statement Segment Reports

104 Annual Report: Contents
Highlights Financial & Production Statistics EVA Reporting HRA Reporting Environmental Reporting Social Reporting Value Added Statement Inflation Accounting

105 “The woods are lovely, dark and deep. But I have promises to keep.
And miles to go before I sleep, And miles to go before I sleep.” Robert Frost “Arise, awake and stop not till the goal is reached.”


Download ppt "FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING Prof. Ranjan Kumar Bal Utkal University."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google