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1 Practices of Modern Engineering Lecture 24 About Innovation & Closure Luis San Andres Mast-Childs Tribology Professor.

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Presentation on theme: "1 Practices of Modern Engineering Lecture 24 About Innovation & Closure Luis San Andres Mast-Childs Tribology Professor."— Presentation transcript:

1 1 Practices of Modern Engineering Lecture 24 About Innovation & Closure http://rotorlab.tamu.edu/me489 Luis San Andres Mast-Childs Tribology Professor Texas A&M University April 28, 2011

2 2 Innovation 2. “The Innovation Economy,” Business Week 75th Anniversary Issue, October 11, 2004 Inspiration is fine, but above all, innovation is really a management process. Innovation is the application of invention. The process of innovation begins with invention, and is only realized when a market develops.

3 3 Technology path Time Initial Deployment -Fast changes Mature technology reaches limit Performance measurement All technologies (innovations) evolve to satisfy a need. At the start, performance growth rate is fast. However, as time passes, the technology matures to reach its limit. The more mature the technology, the more resources to enable gains in performance unless….. ~exponential growth

4 4 Moore‘s Law Time Performance measurement 1965: Transistor density on ICs doubles every two years http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Transistor_Count_and_Moore%27s_Law_-_2008.svg

5 5 Moore‘s Law Time Performance measurement http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Hard_drive_capacity_over_time.svg Hard Drive Capacity

6 6 Technology shifts Time B replaces A C replaces B, etc Performance measurement A B C Paradigm shifts Moore’s Law is too simple. In reality, leaps in performance demand paradigm shifts

7 7 Technology shifts: hard drives Time Performance measurement A: tape storage B: HD storage (speed, track spacing, drums, head height) C: Solid State storage D: Molecular (nano) storage

8 8 Technology shifts: aircraft engines Time Performance measurement A: reciprocating IC engines B: Jet gas turbine engines C: High fan bypass engines D: ramjets

9 9 Types of Innovations (technologies) Sustaining technologies improve marginally existing products or services (quality of CDs, storage in HDs, IC engine cars), They require gradual change and retain Status Quo. Disruptive technologies completely change the nature of a market or business (iPod, mobile phones, digital photography and sound, solid state memory, on-line retailing) The Economist, Idea, May 11, 2009 The Innovator’s Dilemma & The Innovator’s Solution Prof C. Christensen, Harvard BS

10 10 Innovator’s Dilemma Prof C. Christensen, Harvard BS Sustained Innovation Makes better products that can be sold for more money to attractive customers - optimization Addresses to specific customer needs Incumbents almost always prevail: more resources, bigger profits Examples: PDAs, Cell phones, Cars, Engines, Power generation The Economist, Idea, May 11, 2009

11 11 Disruptive Innovation http://my.asme.org/Videos/Entrepreneurship_Innovation.cfm Innovator’s Dilemma Prof C. Christensen, Harvard BS Simpler, more convenient product that sells for less money and appeals to new or unattractive customers Entrants likely to beat incumbents. Cost structure low enough to make profit on discount prices Ex: Ikea, Dell, Embraer Airplanes It comes from listening to your customers – not what they say, but about what they do

12 12 Dilemma for corporations Innovator’s Dilemma Prof C. Christensen, Harvard BS Big breakthroughs or steady optimization? whether to go for the big bang change or whether to shuffle along with business more or less as usual. For a while in the 1990s the slow shuffle was in favor, backed by concepts such as kaizen, the Japanese idea of gradual improvement, and business process re-engineering. But by the late 1990s, along with a disruptive innovation called the internet, a certain impatience had crept in. The Economist, Idea, May 11, 2009

13 13 Dilemma: Sustained or disruptive? Innovator’s Dilemma Prof C. Christensen, Harvard BS Companies cannot miss the next big bang and look for “breakthrough opportunities,” opportunities to leapfrog ahead of opponents. The best way for big organizations to harness the potential of disruptive innovations is to set up (or buy) separate “spin-off organizations” that behave as if they are small and buzzy. Such spin-offs, however, need to have a very different culture from their parents: targeting small markets (first) and having a much higher tolerance of failure. The Economist, Idea, May 11, 2009

14 14 Innovation is risk Experience shows that the ability to sell ideas is the critical factor in enabling technical people, indeed anyone, to “make a difference.” Innovation involves new ideas and requires change. Change is risky. However it may be riskier NOT to change. (Change or perish!) PRISM, 2002, Selling Innovation Ronald J. Bennett, Ph.D. Engineering and Technology Management University of St. Thomas, St. Paul, Minnesota

15 15 Selling Innovation Why it is necessary to “sell” innovation: 1. There is nothing that cannot be done or made better. 2. No new discovery or idea (invention) has value to others until it is applied (innovation). 3. Every new idea meets resistance. 4. People buy for their reasons, not yours. 5. It is an obligation of leadership to take others where they wouldn’t go by themselves. 6. It is goal of lifelong learning to become consciously competent at whatever we do. 7. To be effective and to get support from others, technical professionals need to be able to “sell” their ideas in terms that resonate with their buyers. PRISM, 2002, Selling Innovation Ronald J. Bennett, Ph.D. Engineering and Technology Management University of St. Thomas, St. Paul, Minnesota

16 16 Innovation 1. National Innovation Initiative Final Report (2004): http://www.compete.orghttp://www.compete.org Innovation is ‘the intersection of invention and insight, leading to the creation of social & economic value.’ Innovation (1) can be taught, (2) can be managed, and (3) can be stimulated. Innovation is a national priority, central to economic growth in an increasingly fast- paced, + competitive, and global environment

17 17 Creativity American engineering schools must play to the strengths of our system in the new global economy. American engineers lead the world in two fundamental ways: innovation and the ability to recognize and improve systems. While India may be good at writing specific computer code, Germany excels at precision, and Japan at continuous improvement, American engineers excel at creativity, “About the time we begin to lose jobs overseas, we change the game, and it makes the argument irrelevant,” NAEP: The Engineer of 2020 Creativity is an indispensable quality for engineering! Invention is the beginning…….. The business of being creative is fundamental to our long-term economic health. This creativity needs to be nurtured, needs to be emphasized, needs to be measured. INNOVATION INNOVATIVE

18 18 The 3-corners of Eng Vision 2020 NAEP: Educating the Engineer of 2020 Superb Engineering (Maths, Physics, Science) Entrepreneurship, Philanthropy, Ethics Arts Creativity & Innovation, Design, Communication

19 19 Focus Design Centered Education NAEP: Educating the Engineer of 2020 Coursework Foundation Specialization Realization Projects Y1 Y2 Y3 Y4 Design Centered & Project oriented education with firm and realizable deliverables. Foundation: mastering and applying fundamentals in substantial eng projects Specialization: develop &apply knowledge in depth- chose fields Realization: tackle problems similar to professional practice. Industry sponsored- collaborative How to teach/learn innovation:

20 20 Resources http://www.compete.org Compete.org Council on competitiveness: CEOs, University presidents and labor leaders working to ensure U.S. prosperity Numerous publications (free of charge) on innovation, technology, strategies, etc Innovation is a national priority, central to economic growth in an increasingly fast-paced, + competitive, and global environment

21 21 Watch me http://my.asme.org/Videos/Entrepreneurship_Innovation.cfm

22 22 Resources

23 23 Note: Innovation also applies to you as an engineer (Re)invent your self and be able to sell your own product (engineering competence). Enable and nurture what makes you distinct, unique….

24 24 The News this week

25 25 Besides the necessary technical skills, what else is needed from US engineers? National Academy of Engineering (NAE) 2007 Vision 2020 : To enhance the nation's economic productivity and improve the quality of life worldwide, engineering education in the US must anticipate and adapt to the dramatic changes of engineering practice. Modern Engineering Needs

26 26 a) Apply knowledge of mathematics, science and engineering b) Design and construct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data c) Design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs within realistic constraints such as economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, health and safety, manufacturability, and sustainability d) Function on multi-disciplinary teams e) Identify, formulate and solve engineering problems f) Understanding of professional and ethical responsibility g) Communicate effectively h) The broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global, economic, environmental, and societal context i) Recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in life-long learning j) A knowledge of contemporary issues k) An ability to use the techniques, skills and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice. ABET Engineering Criteria 2000: Outcomes (a-k) Qualities of modern engineer Upon graduation students must demonstrate an ability to

27 27 This class was about: An Introduction to the practices of modern engineering: a) application of the sciences (mathematics and physics) and engineering principles to satisfy needs, and b) other tracts that will ensure the engineer’s survival and continued success in the profession

28 28 What were the expectations? Will learn the various skills that an engineer exercises daily in his/her work, the dos & don’ts of practical engineering, the competitive advantages that will keep you ahead How to learn to be an active learner How to respect & protect intellectual property

29 29 +++ Management: time, schedules, resources & own career Team player: how to work & how to communicate with others Responsibility own & world (global village), ethics and safety Innovation how to learn it, how to practice it.

30 30 Class outcomes - evaluation Class Outcomes Very Satisfied Satisfied Somewhat Satisfied Dissatisfi ed N/A Total 1 Help students to realign their thinking and learning processes by having a vision of real engineering work 22123 37 2 Facilitate the exploration of a topic of mutual interest by students and lecturer 22132 3 Provide a platform for students to engage in in-depth discussion on a specific (scientific) issue and to present their ideas clearly in oral and written form 28 9 4 Offer students a diversity of scientific topics to choose from, exposing them to areas that they may otherwise not have the chance to experience 279 5 Establish a rapport between lecturer and students, creating opportunities for mentorship in the students’ later UG years and beyond 27 10 43 registered

31 31 Class outcomes - evaluation Class Outcomes Very Satisfied Satisfied Somewhat Satisfied Dissatisfied Total 1 Help students to realign their thinking and learning processes by having a vision of real engineering work 59%32%8% 100% 2 Facilitate the exploration of a topic of mutual interest by students and lecturer 59%35%6% 3 Provide a platform for students to engage in in-depth discussion on a specific (scientific) issue and to present their ideas clearly in oral and written form 76%24% 4 Offer students a diversity of scientific topics to choose from, exposing them to areas that they may otherwise not have the chance to experience 76%24% 5 Establish a rapport between lecturer and students, creating opportunities for mentorship in the students’ later UG years and beyond 73%27%

32 32 Vision EC 2020: Skills to succeed Educating the Engineer of 2020 (NAE) Prepared for global competency Superb communication skills (written & oral) Trained in teams that work and deliver Ready for open-ended multidisciplinary problems with no unique answer Ready for innovation and to embrace change Show absolute professional integrity DO MORE WITH LESS DO THINGS RIGHT THE FIRST TIME

33 33 Thanks to Group Name Student 1Student 2Student 3Student 4Student 5Student 6 The Wrecking Crew Brenna Welch Kaylan Martin Michael Carroll Thomas Vest Dustin Smith Michael Mitchel A&M Team Monica Foster Mark Fondren Mitch Johnson Adam VaclavikDrew Parks Classic Style Rico MartinezTravis Cable Stephanie Simerskey Sam McCaskil Phillip Laughbaum Grant McCall The Better Team Kevin Unietis Hunter Palmer Bryce Peterman Nathan Mentzer Toby Williams Team Alpha Blake CarltonMichael CoxLana WilsonDamon RitterGary Daigle Shanna Simmons Last Pick Kathryn Harris Anthony Sposato Matt KoenigJason Bryan Stephen Davis Gilligan's Blade Carlos Dela Guardia Tyler Lindt Pilar Mondragon Brice Jackson Jack Schommer LeftOvers Joshua Norsworthy Sarah CorbittJoel Turtle Clayton Martin James Hamaker For their hard work and cooperation. See class feedback (recommendations) at http://rotorlab.tamu.edu/me489http://rotorlab.tamu.edu/me489 (*) Group leaders in red DOWNLOAD CLASS CONTENTS – zipped file (112 MB)

34 34 Congraduations! Jason Bryan Michael Carroll Michael Cox Stephen Davis Mark Fondren James Hamaker Kathryn Harris Hunter Palmer Bryce Peterman Damon Ritter Shanna Marie Simmons Dustin Smith Joel Turtle Kevin Unietis Lana Ann Wilson ME B.S. May 2011 Best of the best, a productive professional career and a rewarding personal life.

35 35 For those students still in school How can I better prepare myself for working as an engineer in the real world? Recommendations from students at National University of Singapore Fall 2009

36 36 AREASMETHODOLOGYBENEFITS Communication  Be more outspoken  Voice opinion in the correct way (i.e. respectful yet powerful)  Be well read  Develop the habit of proofreading  Develop the habit of writing well (e.g. vocabulary)  Be precise in writing  Attending presentations workshops  Attend lessons to improve writing  Increase fluency and effectiveness in conveying a message and ideas  Be able to speak to other at their frequency  Increase confidence Teamwork  Participate in school-wide projects  Join an interest group or (professional) society  Play a active part in all group assignment and ask for feedbacks  Be receptive to working with different people (regardless of background, gender, culture, nationality).  Learn to communicate with corporate representative  Have the experience of working with a diversity of people  Learn to solve problems derived from diversity in members How can I better prepare myself for working as an engineer in the real world? NUS students – Fall 2009

37 37 How can I better prepare myself for working as an engineer in the real world? AREASMETHODOLOGYBENEFITS Experience  Take part in internship projects  Go on field trips  Attend conferences, exhibitions and seminars conducted by industries' representatives  Obtain first-hand working experience to preparation for real work  Gain exposure in different working styles  Creating a more realistic expectations of one’s future workplace Knowledge  Active Learning  Take classes from other disciplines  Read newspapers and magazines, but discern the information thoroughly before accepting them.  Simply meet more people out of your Dept.  Gain knowledge and understanding in various disciplines  Able to address the concerns from a different disciplines  Gain ability to integrate cross- faculty knowledge and act as a bridge between the engineering and non- engineering community NUS students – Fall 2009

38 38 3: Group work should not be done at the last minute, as it compromises discussion opportunities 1: To effectively prepare students to work as a team, it is fundamentally important to change the existing stereotype that “engineers do things by themselves” and establish the importance of teamwork as part of the curriculum 2: Out there, it is not about merely solving ‘problem number three’, but about how efficient an engineer can work together with other individuals. In turn, efficiency requires fine communication skills. NUS students – Fall 2009 How can I better prepare myself for working as an engineer in the real world?

39 39 5 To prepare for this, students must practice teamwork, understand related disciplines and increase their exposure to the world. Our society, being a multicultural society, already provides opportunities for cross-cultural interactions which must not be neglected. 4:.. students have the impression that working alone is more effective than working in a team. This is because they think that being able to work alone will cause them to stand out from the crowd. However they do not realize that having this mentality can have adverse effects on their career in the future. NUS students – Fall 2010 How can I better prepare myself for working as an engineer in the real world?

40 40 Closure Keep as long as you live the desire to learn & help others. It’s been a privilege to teach you and to learn from you. Practices of Modern Engineering Contact lecturer at Lsanandres@tamu.edu Learn more on his work at http://rotorlab.tamu.edu and his music at http://www.ies3.com/ElSanto Thanks!

41 41 Practices of Modern Engineering © Luis San Andres Texas A&M University 2011 http://rotorlab.tamu.edu/me489


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