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4th International Symposium on Flood Defence Toronto, Ontario, Canada, May, 6-8, 2008 RIVER FLOODS IN THE CHANGING CLIMATE – OBSERVATIONS AND PROJECTIONS.

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Presentation on theme: "4th International Symposium on Flood Defence Toronto, Ontario, Canada, May, 6-8, 2008 RIVER FLOODS IN THE CHANGING CLIMATE – OBSERVATIONS AND PROJECTIONS."— Presentation transcript:

1 4th International Symposium on Flood Defence Toronto, Ontario, Canada, May, 6-8, 2008 RIVER FLOODS IN THE CHANGING CLIMATE – OBSERVATIONS AND PROJECTIONS Zbigniew W. Kundzewicz Research Centre for Agricultural and Forest Environment, Polish Academy of Sciences, Poznań, Poland Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, Potsdam, Germany

2 Contents Introduction Multi-factor context Observations Projections Adaptation Concluding remarks

3 Canada: Heavy rain combined with melting of the heaviest winter snow accumulation in memory. Floods on already swollen rivers. St John River at Fort Kent at record high level, surpassing 1979 record crest. Worst flood in 80 years of record keeping. A "greater than a 100-year event" in Fort Kent. Damage to roads and bridges. Source: Dartmouth Floods Observatory

4 Insured and total property losses caused by weather events ($45 billion and $107 billion in 2004, respectively) are rising faster than premiums, population, or economic growth. Data exclude health and life insurance premiums and losses. Inflation-adjusted economic losses from catastrophic events rose by 8- fold between the 1960s and 1990s and insured losses by 17- fold. [Mills, 2005] The global decline in aggregate deaths and death rates due to extreme weather events during the 20th century suggest that adaptation measures to cope with some of the worst consequences of such events have been successful. [IPCC AR4 WG II Ch.1]

5 Contents Introduction Multi-factor context Observations Projections Adaptation Concluding remarks

6 (i) Changes in socio-economic systems Land-use change, increasing exposure and damage potential – floodplain development, growing wealth in flood-prone areas, changing risk perception (ii) Changes in terrestrial systems Land-cover change - urbanization, deforestation, elimination of natural inundation areas (wetlands, floodplains), river regulation – channel straightening and shortening, embankments), damming rivers, adverse changes of conditions of transformation of precipitation into runoff (iii) Changes in climate and atmospheric system Holding capacity of the atmosphere, intense precipitation, seasonality, circulation patterns Reasons for changes in flood risk and vulnerability Source: Kundzewicz & Schellnhuber, 2004

7 1000-year flood

8

9 Old 1000-year flood New 1000-year flood

10 Impacts of land-use change on floods DischargePrecipitation urbanized area rural area Time

11 Water holding capacity of the atmosphere Clausius-Clapeyron equation de s (T) / e s (T) = L dT / R T 2 where e s (T) is the saturation vapor pressure at temperature T, L is the latent heat of vaporization, and R is the gas constant. T  e s (T)  1 o C 6-7%

12 Contents Introduction Multi-factor context Observations Projections Adaptation Concluding remarks

13 Contribution to total annual precipitation from very wet days (95th percentile and above). [IPCC WGI AR4, 2007, Groisman et al., 2005, Alexander et al., 2006]

14 Source: CHMU

15 Maximum water levels, Elbe at Dresden. Source: Grünewald Record level of Elbe at Dresden: 940 cm on 17 August 2002

16 Linström & Bergström (Hydrol. Sci. J., 2004) Conclusions from a study of trends in 61 river flow series in Sweden: ■ Flood magnitude increased substantially between 1970 and 2002, but similar conditions were experienced in 1920s. ■ Flood peaks in old data are probably underestimated. ■ The largest flow increase was found in less reliable data series. ■ It is therefore difficut to conclude that flood levels are increasing in a statistically significant way.

17 Radziejewski & Kundzewicz (Hydrol. Sci. J., 2004): ♦ Failure to detect a significant trend does not mean the absence of change. ♦ Examination of detectability of artificially introduced, hence fully controlled, trends in time series leads to the following common-sense results: ♦ If a change is weak and lasts for a short time, it is not likely to be detected. If a change is stronger and lasts longer, the likelihood of detection grows.

18 Karjaanjoki, Lohjanjarvi-Peltokoski (SF) Maximum annual flow Rhine, Kaub (D) Main, Schweinfurt (D) Source: Kundzewicz et al. (2004) Morava, Moravicany (CZ) WCP-Water

19 Year of occurrence of maximum flow (Source: Kundzewicz et al., 2004) WCP-Water The overall maxima for the period occurred more frequently in (46 times) than in (24 times)

20 Contents Introduction Multi-factor context Observations Projections Adaptation Concluding remarks

21 Difference between and (A2, HadRM3-P) Mean precipitation Annual maximum precipitation Source: Kundzewicz et al. (2004)

22 Changes in extremes based on multi-model simulations from nine global coupled climate models. L) Globally averaged changes in precipitation intensity (defined as the annual total precipitation divided by the number of wet days) for three scenarios. R) Changes of spatial patterns of precipitation intensity based on simulations between two 20-year means (2080–2099 minus 1980–1999) for the A1B scenario. (IPCC AR4)

23 Changes in percentiles of precipitation, Poznań grid, HadRM3 ( vs ). Source: Kundzewicz et al. (2004)

24 Changing probability of extreme seasonal precipitation in boreal winter. The ratio of probability of a very wet winter for CO2 doubling vs present [Palmer & Räisänen, 2002]

25 [Milly et al., 2002]

26 Contents Introduction Multi-factor context Observations Projections Adaptation Concluding remarks

27 Flood protection and management strategies modify either flood waters, or susceptibility to flood damage and impact of flooding. Protect [Absolute protection does not exist. Japan – superdikes] Accommodate [Living with floods, learning from them] Retreat [The state/province purchases land and property in flood-prone areas] Examples of measures: structural/technical protection measures - dikes, relief channels, enhanced water storage; watershed management (“keep water where it falls” and reduce surface runoff and erosion), or increase of system resistance: flood forecasting and warning; regulation through planning, legislation and zoning; flood insurance; relocation of population living in flood-risk areas; flood proofing on location.

28 European Union Floods Directive Preliminary flood risk assessment (including assessment of the projected impact of climate change trends; forecast of estimated consequences of future floods, …). Preparation of flood maps and indicative flood damage maps, covering the geographical areas which could be flooded with a high probability (return period of 10 years); with a medium probability (100 years), and with a low probability (extreme events). Preparation and implementation of flood risk management plans, aimed at achieving the required levels of protection.

29 Water managers in a few countries have begun to consider the implications of climate change explicitly in flood management. In the UK and in Bavaria design flood magnitudes have been increased by 20% and 15%, respectively, to reflect the possible effects of climate change. Measures to cope with the increase of the design discharge for the Rhine in the Netherlands from to m 3 /s must be implemented by 2015 and it is planned to increase the design discharge to m 3 /s in the longer term due to climate change.

30 ERA-NET CRUE ( C OORDINATION DE LA R ECHERCHE SUR LA GESTION DES INONDATIONS FINANCÉE DANS L’ U NION E UROPÉENNE ) Inter-comparison of national research programmes Identification of good practice on programme identification and management Dissemination methods for current national research results Identification of opportunities and gaps in research Pilot common calls for research European research agenda for flood risk mitigation

31 Contents Introduction Multi-factor context Observations Projections Adaptation Concluding remarks

32 ♦ The impact of climate forcing on flood risk is complex and depends on the flood generation mechanism. ♦ Higher and more intense precipitation has been already observed and this trend is expected to strengthen in the warmer world, directly impacting on flood risk. ♦ However, snowmelt and ice-jam related floods have been decreasing over much of Europe. ♦ It is difficult to disentangle the climatic change component from strong natural variability and direct human impacts. ♦ IPCC (2001): „The analysis of extreme events in both observations and coupled models is underdeveloped.” „The changes in frequency of extreme events cannot be generally attributed to the human influence on global climate.”

33 Acknowledgements to co-authors of: IPCC WGII Fourth Assessment Report Chapter 3: Freshwater Resources and their Management [www.ipcc.ch] Coordinating Lead Authors Zbigniew W. Kundzewicz (Poland) and Luis Jose Mata (Venezuela) Lead Authors Nigel Arnell (UK), Petra Döll (Germany), Pavel Kabat (The Netherlands), Blanca Jimenez (Mexico), Kathleen Miller (USA), Taikan Oki (Japan), Zekai Sen (Turkey), Igor Shiklomanov (Russia) Contributing Authors Jun Asanuma (Japan), Stewart Cohen (Canada), Mark Nearing (USA), Richard Betts (UK), Christel Prudhomme (UK), Roger Pulwarty (Trinidad and Tobago), Roland Schulze (South Africa), Renoj Thayyen (India), Nick van de Giesen (The Netherlands), Henk van Schaik (The Netherlands), Tom Wilbanks (USA), Robert Wilby (UK) Review Editors Alfred Becker (Germany), James Bruce (Canada)


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