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Antarctic Journal: Four Months at the Bottom of the World Photos for Journal Entries By: Jennifer Owings Dewey Photograph by: Lisa Trotter Date Taken:

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Presentation on theme: "Antarctic Journal: Four Months at the Bottom of the World Photos for Journal Entries By: Jennifer Owings Dewey Photograph by: Lisa Trotter Date Taken:"— Presentation transcript:

1 Antarctic Journal: Four Months at the Bottom of the World Photos for Journal Entries By: Jennifer Owings Dewey Photograph by: Lisa Trotter Date Taken: July 13, 2010 National Science Foundation This Palmer Station sunrise photo was taken about 8:45 am on July 13. Palmer is located 64 degrees, 46 minutes South of the equator. Because it is just north of the Antarctic Circle (66.5 degrees South), it never experiences total winter darkness. Instead, they enjoy brilliant sunsets and sunrises throughout the winter.

2 Photograph by: Peter Rejcek Date Taken: January 24, 2010 National Science Foundation Zodiacs ferry passengers from the tourist ship CORINTHIAN II to and from Palmer Station. Palmer Station, located on Anvers Island off the west coast of the Antarctic Peninsula, receives several thousand tourists each year. DAY1DAY1

3 Photograph by: Peter Rejcek Date Taken: January 6, 2010 National Science Foundation Palmer Station personnel use Zodiac boats to reach their research destinations. The photographer of this photo is on Torgerson Island, near the Antarctic Peninsula. DAY2DAY2

4 Photograph by: Jessy Jenkins Date Taken: November 29, 2009 National Science Foundation Adelies at Cape Hallett, along the Borchgrevink Coast, Antarctica. The Admiralty Mountains can be seen in the distance. DAY3DAY3

5 Photograph by: Joe Stanford National Science Foundation Date Taken: January 19, 2004 Orcas near Ross Island. The largest dolphin, Orcas can grow to nearly 10 meters in length and to 7 tons in weight. DAY4DAY4

6 Photograph by: Charles Kaminski National Science Foundation Date Taken: November 14, 2005 U.S. Antarctic Program participant Al Baker steadies himself in high winds at Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station. The flags of the 12 original Antarctic Treaty signatory nations fly at the South Pole. DAY5DAY5

7 Photograph by: James Hebrlee Date Taken: December 28, 2004 National Science Foundation Two Weddell seals. DAY6DAY6

8 Photograph by: Adam Jenkins Date Taken: January 23, 2010 National Science Foundation The Research Vessel NATHANIEL B. PALMER in Barilari Bay, Antarctic Peninsula. The NBP is on a two-month science expedition to the Larsen B Embayment once occupied by a major ice shelf. In 2002, the ice shelf collapsed in a million pieces, leaving only a shard of the Larsen B Ice Shelf and a rapidly changed ecosystem in its wake. The ice shelf had been in place for at least 10,000 years. Read more about this science expedition in The Antarctic Sun's "Change of Plans" - January 15, 2010: DAY7DAY7


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