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Human Rights: 8 Principles for Curriculum Renewal in Health Challenge: How to instill knowledge, attitudes and behaviours that are aligned with the eight.

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Presentation on theme: "Human Rights: 8 Principles for Curriculum Renewal in Health Challenge: How to instill knowledge, attitudes and behaviours that are aligned with the eight."— Presentation transcript:

1 Human Rights: 8 Principles for Curriculum Renewal in Health Challenge: How to instill knowledge, attitudes and behaviours that are aligned with the eight principles of human rights for persons with disabilities, in our curricula to positively effect the way our graduates engage in collaborative learning, health care professional practice and research. The eight principles are: respect; non-discrimination; participation and inclusion; respect for difference and acceptance; equality of opportunity; accessibility; equality between men and women and respect for children. This project seeks to address a strategic challenge for the Faculty of Health Sciences in the context of the Faculty Strategic Plan : ‘The faculty takes as its underpinning proposition the values embedded in the moral and legal framework of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (2006) ratified by the Australian Government in 2008.’(FHS Strategic Plan, , p. 2) Solution: In line with the University of Sydney Graduate Attributes Statements and the specific attributes listed under Ethical, Social and Professional Understanding, an opportunity exists for the faculty to build a culture and community of genuine inclusion by embedding these eight principles through curriculum renewal into the FHS curriculum Framework (Figure 1), ensuring all students are able to identify with and build upon these as they progress through their studies. Although legislation supporting these principles in health provision and education is well documented, it is thought that the integration of these into curricula across the disciplines is sporadic. This project will identify what is already in existence, provide a framework for future curriculum renewal projects and provide case examples of how to embed these into teaching practice. ‘ Injunctions such as ‘health for all’, ‘social inclusion’ and ‘closing the gap’ rest on the notion that what is available to some groups in the population should be available to all: access to health and health care is a right, not a privilege.’ …Polices designed within this social justice perspective can be regarded not so much as meeting the ‘special needs’ of disadvantaged groups but rather as guaranteeing basic rights to health and health care’ (Palmer and Short, 2010: p. 278) References Chapparo, C. (in press). Paediatric occupational therapy in Australia: Recognizing multiculturalism in policy. In S. Lane and A. Bundy, (Eds.). Kids will be kids. (pp ). Philadelphia: F.A. Davis Palmer G R and S D Short (2010) Health Care and Public Policy: An Australian Analysis, Melbourne: Macmillan, 4 th edition. Short, S. (1981) An holistic approach towards disabled persons and their rehabilitation, Australian J Physiotherapy, vol. 27, No. 5,, pp United Nations UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities University of Sydney, Faculty of Health Sciences (2010) Curriculum Framework: Leadership in People-Oriented Health Care University of Sydney (2004) Statement of Generic Attributes of Graduates Attributes University of Sydney, Faculty of Health Sciences (2011) Strategic Plan, University of Sydney ( ) White Paper Faculty: Health Sciences Team: Professor Stephanie Short, Associate Dean Postgraduate, Discipline of Behavioural & Social Sciences in Health; Dr Chris Chaparro, Senior Lecturer, Discipline of Occupational Therapy; Ros Madden, Director, Australian ICF Disability and Rehabilitation Research Program; Dr Warren Reed, Senior Lecturer, Discipline of Medical Radiation Sciences; Bridianne O’Dea, Associate Lecturer; Opal – Suchaya Thongyoo, Research Assistant. Contact: Figure 1- Curriculum Framework for the Faculty of Health Sciences What we will actually do: Table 1: Project action plan and costing Identify and produce examples and case studies to support the scaffold in the area of Personal and Professional Development. Timeline: May 2012 – July 2012 Establish a scaffold for curriculum renewal for FHS across the curriculum framework and across years. Timeline: February 2012 – April 2012 Conduct a curriculum audit of what actually exists in the faculty. Identify resources, activities, examples and elements of curricula around the faculty where these principles are underpinning learning. Timeline: October 2011 – January 2012 Evaluate Survey student knowledge of principles pre and post project implementation Run Evaluation focus groups with staff to evaluate resources and staff awareness of principles within the curricula Sustain Develop a webpage dedicated to the project for future reference Make resources available electronically for re-usability Disseminate Our Project will be disseminated to the University community through the Widening participation Scholars website as an ongoing resource for interested colleagues at Sydney. The Poster will be used at other Conferences (such as HERDSA and Allied Health Professionals) and at meetings in the faculty and University Total Cost: $14,616.88


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