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Monday 1/5/15 RAP What did you do over break? What did you do over break? Did you relax? Did you relax?Today: Sign up for CE – on board Sign up for CE.

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Presentation on theme: "Monday 1/5/15 RAP What did you do over break? What did you do over break? Did you relax? Did you relax?Today: Sign up for CE – on board Sign up for CE."— Presentation transcript:

1 Monday 1/5/15 RAP What did you do over break? What did you do over break? Did you relax? Did you relax?Today: Sign up for CE – on board Sign up for CE – on board America the Story of US –”Boom” America the Story of US –”Boom”

2 Tuesday 1/6/15 R.A.P— R.A.P— READ PAGE 336 AND LOOK AT THE PICTURE ON PAGE 337. READ PAGE 336 AND LOOK AT THE PICTURE ON PAGE 337. HOW DO YOU THINK THIS WRITING AND PICTURE ILLUSTRATES AMERICANS ATTITUDES AND FEELINGS DURING THE 1920s? HOW DO YOU THINK THIS WRITING AND PICTURE ILLUSTRATES AMERICANS ATTITUDES AND FEELINGS DURING THE 1920s? DO YOU THINK THIS ATTITUDE IS DIFFERENT THAN BEFORE WWI? EXPLAIN. DO YOU THINK THIS ATTITUDE IS DIFFERENT THAN BEFORE WWI? EXPLAIN.

3 POSTWAR AMERICA AND THE ROARING TWENTIES CH. 11 AND 12 PO1: Analyze how aspects of industrialization transformed the American economy beginning in the late 19th century mass production PO 2: assess how social developments influenced American society in the late 19th and 20th centuries: c. urbanization and social reform d. mass media—radio e. consumerism f. Roaring Twenties PO3: Analyze events which caused a transformation of the United States during the late 19th and early 20th centuries: Progressive movement g. Red Scare

4 POSTWAR AMERICA CH PAGES Be able to describe political and social changes in postwar U.S.

5 U.S. Review: end of 1 st Semester With the person next to you —make an ABC list of vocabulary, people, events depicting happenings in U.S. history from 1860 to With the person next to you —make an ABC list of vocabulary, people, events depicting happenings in U.S. history from 1860 to A B C D E F

6 Open your textbook to page 338 Title your notes Ch Postwar Turmoil Title your notes Ch Postwar Turmoil As you read and take notes please look at the pictures, charts, timelines, etc. As you read and take notes please look at the pictures, charts, timelines, etc.

7 Ch Post War Turmoil Notes on Ch Post War Turmoil Vocabulary: Vocabulary: Radical, anarchism, and prohibition Radical, anarchism, and prohibition Events and people: Events and people: Sacco and Vanzetti Sacco and Vanzetti Red Scare Red Scare A. Mitchell Palmer A. Mitchell Palmer Great Migration Great Migration Marcus Garvey Marcus Garvey Progressivism Progressivism Suffrage Suffrage Example: As you take notes on these men make sure you are able to answer these questions: Sacco and Vanzetti pages Sacco and Vanzetti pages Who are they? Who are they? What is anarchism? What is anarchism? What did they do? What did they do? What happened to them? What happened to them? How did the world react? How did the world react?

8 Note taker template Please follow this template as you take notes on readings from the textbook. Please follow this template as you take notes on readings from the textbook. To get full points you must have complete notes as shown on template. To get full points you must have complete notes as shown on template. Underline subtopics Underline subtopics Underline key people, vocab, etc. Underline key people, vocab, etc. Write neatly and make sure it is legible. Write neatly and make sure it is legible. Ch notes DUE Wednesday Ch notes DUE Wednesday

9 Vocabulary Ch Please make sure you KNOW, and can explain these vocab words, people, and events in relation to the reading. So, add what this term, person, or event is about relating to this time period in your notes. Please make sure you KNOW, and can explain these vocab words, people, and events in relation to the reading. So, add what this term, person, or event is about relating to this time period in your notes. Radical Radical Anarchism Anarchism Prohibition Prohibition Sacco and Vanzetti Sacco and Vanzetti Red scare- Red scare- A. Mitchell Palmer A. Mitchell Palmer Great Migration Great Migration Marcus Garvey Marcus Garvey Suffrage Suffrage

10 Wednesday 1/7/15 RAP Explain why progressivism declined in the 1920s. Explain why progressivism declined in the 1920s.Today: 1. Review Ch “Postwar Turmoil” 2. Watch the Presidents video 3. Read and add notes to Presidents notes on Ch “The Republican Influence” 4. Also, take notes titled “Ch. 11.2– Republican Foreign Policy” pages

11 Sacco and Vanzetti Immigrants from Italy who were anarchists and accused of murdering two men. Immigrants from Italy who were anarchists and accused of murdering two men. Anarchists did not recognize the authority of government. Anarchists did not recognize the authority of government. People were afraid of anarchists and communism. People were afraid of anarchists and communism. Both men were executed in 1927, after 6 years of appeals. Both men were executed in 1927, after 6 years of appeals. Riots broke out around the world in favor of Sacco and Vanzetti. Riots broke out around the world in favor of Sacco and Vanzetti. Fifty years to the day of their execution, Michael Dukakis cleared the names of Sacco and Vanzetti. Fifty years to the day of their execution, Michael Dukakis cleared the names of Sacco and Vanzetti. Dukakis said the trial had been “permeated with prejudice.” Dukakis said the trial had been “permeated with prejudice.”

12 Analyze this political cartoon.

13 THE RED SCARE Factors leading to the Red Scare Factors leading to the Red Scare Russian Revolution frightened people on communism. Russian Revolution frightened people on communism. Radicals wanted social and political change. Radicals wanted social and political change. Many people believed immigrants and radicals were stirring up a communist revolution. Many people believed immigrants and radicals were stirring up a communist revolution. A. Mitchell Palmer, President Wilson’s attorney general, led the Red Scare which was a violent wave of anti-Communist panic that spread through the U.S. in 1919 and A. Mitchell Palmer, President Wilson’s attorney general, led the Red Scare which was a violent wave of anti-Communist panic that spread through the U.S. in 1919 and 1920.

14 Palmer Raids Palmer Raids: Raids in the 1920’s of suspected socialists who were either put in jail or deported from the Untied States. Palmer Raids: Raids in the 1920’s of suspected socialists who were either put in jail or deported from the Untied States. Mitchell Palmer the new Attorney General appointed by Woodrow Wilson. Mitchell Palmer the new Attorney General appointed by Woodrow Wilson. Reasons for the Palmer Raids Reasons for the Palmer Raids In April, the United States post office found a total of 38 bombs sent out to big name politicians. In April, the United States post office found a total of 38 bombs sent out to big name politicians. An Italian anarchist was blown up in front of Mitchell Palmers house. An Italian anarchist was blown up in front of Mitchell Palmers house. These events led enforcement officials to believe that terrible events were to occur. Leading to the arrest or deportation of any one suspicious. These events led enforcement officials to believe that terrible events were to occur. Leading to the arrest or deportation of any one suspicious. The first of the “Palmer Raids” was on November 7, ,000’s of communists and anarchists were charged, and over 200 were deported to Finland and then later moved to RussiaThe first of the “Palmer Raids” was on November 7, ,000’s of communists and anarchists were charged, and over 200 were deported to Finland and then later moved to Russia In January, 1920, over 6,000 were arrested.In January, 1920, over 6,000 were arrested. Many believed that Palmer did the raids so he would be a presidential nominee for the Democratic Party in the upcoming election.Many believed that Palmer did the raids so he would be a presidential nominee for the Democratic Party in the upcoming election.

15 THE GREAT MIGRATION Great Migration —Between 1916 and 1920 half a million African Americans left the South for the North. Great Migration —Between 1916 and 1920 half a million African Americans left the South for the North. Causes and effects of the Great Migration Seek better jobs, pay, and opportunities. Not treated as slaves. Seek better jobs, pay, and opportunities. Not treated as slaves. Northern cities exploded with new people and problems. Northern cities exploded with new people and problems. Many Northern whites reacted violently to migration. Many Northern whites reacted violently to migration. Racial unrest—race riots erupted in 26 Northern cities in 1917—competing for jobs that went mainly to white men. Racial unrest—race riots erupted in 26 Northern cities in 1917—competing for jobs that went mainly to white men. Garvey movement— Marcus Garvey, a Jamaican who encouraged Africans to go back to Africa. Garvey movement— Marcus Garvey, a Jamaican who encouraged Africans to go back to Africa.

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17 Progressive Movement Suffrage-1920-the vote helped women push laws through congress. Suffrage-1920-the vote helped women push laws through congress. 19 th amendment 19 th amendment Prohibition-1919-linked with patriotism during the War. Prohibition-1919-linked with patriotism during the War. 18 th amendment 18 th amendment

18 Decline of progressivism People were shocked by violent strikes and did not sympathize w/workers. People were shocked by violent strikes and did not sympathize w/workers. People started to sympathize with big business. People started to sympathize with big business. Hostile Supreme Court— Hostile Supreme Court— In 1918, shot down Child Labor Act, enacted in 1916—states decision. In 1918, shot down Child Labor Act, enacted in 1916—states decision. struck down law enacting minimum wage for women, in struck down law enacting minimum wage for women, in 1923.

19 Vocabulary and events: Watch the Presidents video—Harding, Coolidge, Hoover. (17 minutes) 2. Read Ch. 11.2: pages and add notes to your Presidents notes. 3. Also, take notes on these issues towards the end of Ch Title: Ch. 11 Getting on with Business: Sec. 2- Republican Foreign Policy Internationalism Internationalism Disarmament Disarmament Dawes Plan Dawes Plan Washington Conference Washington Conference Kellogg-Briand Pact Kellogg-Briand Pact Latin American – U.S relations Latin American – U.S relations

20 Thursday 1/8/15 R.A.P. How did Republican policies differ from policies prior to WWI? How did Republican policies differ from policies prior to WWI? What is your view of Harding, Coolidge, and Hoover? What is your view of Harding, Coolidge, and Hoover? Today: CNN Student News Review Ch Begin 11.3—Prosperity and American Business

21 Which President is it…Harding, Coolidge, or Hoover? Which President is it…Harding, Coolidge, or Hoover? 1. Poker cabinet or Ohio gang 2. Sent marines into Nicaragua 3. Teapot Dome Affair 4. Wonder boy 5. Andrew Mellon was secretary of the treasury for…

22 Ch. 11 Getting on w/ business sec. 2- The Republican Influence VOCABULARY: Internationalism— Internationalism— President Wilson’s policy of cooperation and involvement with other countries. Harding was not going to follow Wilson’s policy with foreign governments.—against Wilson’s League of Nations, tired of reformers, and wanted a return to “Normalcy.” President Wilson’s policy of cooperation and involvement with other countries. Harding was not going to follow Wilson’s policy with foreign governments.—against Wilson’s League of Nations, tired of reformers, and wanted a return to “Normalcy.” Disarmament – Disarmament – The limitation or reduction of weapons. Nov. 1921, nine nations met, in DC, to discuss disarmament. This led to ill feelings, on Japan’s part. The limitation or reduction of weapons. Nov. 1921, nine nations met, in DC, to discuss disarmament. This led to ill feelings, on Japan’s part.

23 Republican foreign policy Dawes Plan Dawes Plan Showed how the US influenced European economies without government interference. Showed how the US influenced European economies without government interference. Allies owed $10 bil to the US after WWI Allies owed $10 bil to the US after WWI US insisted on repayment, but Allies could not pay until Germany began repaying them the $33 bil dollars in war reparations. US insisted on repayment, but Allies could not pay until Germany began repaying them the $33 bil dollars in war reparations. Germany defaulted on payment in 1922 and 1923, so the French army went into Germany’s Ruhr Valley. Germany defaulted on payment in 1922 and 1923, so the French army went into Germany’s Ruhr Valley. US wanted to avoid war and Chicago banker, Charles G. Dawes negotiated loans from private banks to Germany. US wanted to avoid war and Chicago banker, Charles G. Dawes negotiated loans from private banks to Germany. Banks loaned Germany 2.5 bil so Germany could make payments. Banks loaned Germany 2.5 bil so Germany could make payments. This way the Allies could make payments to the US. This way the Allies could make payments to the US.

24 Washington Conference Washington Conference Washington Naval Conference, Nov Washington Naval Conference, Nov Nine nations met to discuss disarmament. Nine nations met to discuss disarmament. Limitation or reduction of weapons. Limitation or reduction of weapons. Three major treaties emerged Three major treaties emerged US, GB, Japan, France, and Italy pledged to limit the number of their largest ships and to stop constructing new ships. US, GB, Japan, France, and Italy pledged to limit the number of their largest ships and to stop constructing new ships. GB and US got to keep 500,000 tons of ships each: Japan, 300,000 tons; and France and Italy, 167,000 each. GB and US got to keep 500,000 tons of ships each: Japan, 300,000 tons; and France and Italy, 167,000 each. Japan did not think this was fair, but agreed after GB, the US, and Japan all agreed not to create new naval bases in the western Pacific islands. Japan did not think this was fair, but agreed after GB, the US, and Japan all agreed not to create new naval bases in the western Pacific islands. Japan also promised to respect China’s sovereignty and independence. Japan also promised to respect China’s sovereignty and independence.

25 Kellogg-Briand Pact Kellogg-Briand Pact Two nation pact, initiated by France’s foreign minister Aristide Briand, along with Secretary of State Frank Kellogg, wanting a world treaty to outlaw war. Two nation pact, initiated by France’s foreign minister Aristide Briand, along with Secretary of State Frank Kellogg, wanting a world treaty to outlaw war. 14 nations initially signed the pact. 14 nations initially signed the pact. Declared war illegal. Declared war illegal. Did not include punishments for future attackers. Did not include punishments for future attackers. Was this a realistic idea? Explain. Was this a realistic idea? Explain.

26 Latin American – U.S relations Latin American – U.S relations US wanted to protect interests in LA US wanted to protect interests in LA 1920s, business firms continued their expansion to the south—markets and resources. 1920s, business firms continued their expansion to the south—markets and resources. 1924, US controlled financial policies of 14 out of 20 LA countries. 1924, US controlled financial policies of 14 out of 20 LA countries. US felt it had the right and duty to civilize the southern nations. US felt it had the right and duty to civilize the southern nations to 1933, US soldiers were used in LA to protect business interests to 1933, US soldiers were used in LA to protect business interests. Nicaragua Nicaragua US business controlled economy US business controlled economy Fighting amongst Nicaraguans threatened to destabilize so Coolidge sent troops back in Fighting amongst Nicaraguans threatened to destabilize so Coolidge sent troops back in Trying to make peace Trying to make peace Congress and people at home not real happy Congress and people at home not real happy

27 Review Ch and 11.2 by creating an illustration of an important event or vocabulary Review Ch and 11.2 by creating an illustration of an important event or vocabulary No words No words Illustrations depicting event or vocabulary at the time studied. Illustrations depicting event or vocabulary at the time studied. When you are done put it on the board When you are done put it on the board

28 Friday 1/9/15 RAP RAP What was the Dawes Plan? What was the Dawes Plan? Was it a good idea? Was it a good idea? How did Japan feel about the actions taken during the Washington Conference? How did Japan feel about the actions taken during the Washington Conference? Why? Why? Today: Today: Finish posters Finish posters Open your book to page 353– Please read and take notes on “Prosperity and American Business” during the 1920s. Open your book to page 353– Please read and take notes on “Prosperity and American Business” during the 1920s. Think about the way businesses were running, how people were shopping, and new innovations. Think about the way businesses were running, how people were shopping, and new innovations.

29 Prosperity and American Business Ch. 11.3; pages Look at the pictures, etc.—as a class Look at the pictures, etc.—as a class In this section you will be able to explain the reasons for business prosperity of the 1920s. In this section you will be able to explain the reasons for business prosperity of the 1920s. Describe attitudes toward big business Describe attitudes toward big business Identify changes occurring in the structure of management of American businesses. Identify changes occurring in the structure of management of American businesses. Understand how corporate policies reduced the appeal of unions to workers. Understand how corporate policies reduced the appeal of unions to workers.

30 Ch As you read please take notes (handout) on this section. IT IS ONLINE IF YOU DO NOT COMPLETE!!! As you read please take notes (handout) on this section. IT IS ONLINE IF YOU DO NOT COMPLETE!!! HW: if you do not complete today. HW: if you do not complete today.

31 Vocabulary and terms industrial productivity- the amount of goods each hour of labor produced—in the 1920s it rose by 70%. industrial productivity- the amount of goods each hour of labor produced—in the 1920s it rose by 70%. What did this mean? Corporate investors made more money and the average worker also earned higher wages. What did this mean? Corporate investors made more money and the average worker also earned higher wages. capital – an accumulation of money. capital – an accumulation of money. What did this mean—there was not enough money for the average or family size firms to invest in research and development. Small companies could not compete with the large. What did this mean—there was not enough money for the average or family size firms to invest in research and development. Small companies could not compete with the large. corporation – businesses owned by multiple stockholders, whose personal rights and responsibilities are legally separate from the organization’s. corporation – businesses owned by multiple stockholders, whose personal rights and responsibilities are legally separate from the organization’s. In the 1920s, thousands of small firms went out of business, or they were absorbed into larger companies, because they could not compete. Chain stores grew due to small businesses going out of business. In the 1920s, thousands of small firms went out of business, or they were absorbed into larger companies, because they could not compete. Chain stores grew due to small businesses going out of business. Oligopoly - a few major producers influence an entire industry. Oligopoly - a few major producers influence an entire industry. Oligopolies prevailed in banking, meatpacking, baked good companies, and tobacco producers in the 1920s. A smaller number of Americans were able to yield unmatched economic power. Small firms went out of business and chain stores thrived. Oligopolies prevailed in banking, meatpacking, baked good companies, and tobacco producers in the 1920s. A smaller number of Americans were able to yield unmatched economic power. Small firms went out of business and chain stores thrived.

32 Managerial revolution- Colleges now trained new leaders for the corporations. Managerial revolution- Colleges now trained new leaders for the corporations. Leading universities were establishing new business schools to train students in business. New college trained business managers soon replaced the old general managers. You now had the job of the general manager divided into 5 jobs. Leading universities were establishing new business schools to train students in business. New college trained business managers soon replaced the old general managers. You now had the job of the general manager divided into 5 jobs. welfare capitalism- programs employers adopted in order to convince workers they did not need unions. welfare capitalism- programs employers adopted in order to convince workers they did not need unions. Examples, hired company doctors and nurses, glee clubs, sports teams, sold cheap gasoline, dental clinics, safety programs and group insurance, etc. Did not end the inequalities between worker and employer, but union enrollment did decline. Examples, hired company doctors and nurses, glee clubs, sports teams, sold cheap gasoline, dental clinics, safety programs and group insurance, etc. Did not end the inequalities between worker and employer, but union enrollment did decline.

33 Closure: Do we have any business like welfare capitalism today? Explain. Do we have any business like welfare capitalism today? Explain.


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