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International Conference on Educational Technology 2007 Rethinking Pedagogies: Creating Possibilities through Digital & Interactive Media 21, 22 Nov 2007.

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Presentation on theme: "International Conference on Educational Technology 2007 Rethinking Pedagogies: Creating Possibilities through Digital & Interactive Media 21, 22 Nov 2007."— Presentation transcript:

1 International Conference on Educational Technology 2007 Rethinking Pedagogies: Creating Possibilities through Digital & Interactive Media 21, 22 Nov 2007 Some Learning Points (Part 1 – 21 Nov) Ang JL

2 Opening Address 3 rd IT Masterplan to be launched in 2008 Moe.tec website for Future schools and IT practitioners to form a community of learning. Teachers can sign up to join the community. Ms Chang Hwee Nee Deputy Secretary (Policy) MOE

3 Keynote Address 1 Preparing Students for the Digital Age Our students are digital natives They multi-task, use multimodal technologies They are more expressive iN2015 EdVantage Programme – to promote pervasive and innovative use of IT in schools Interactive Digital Media (IDM) – Learning using digital content – Learning by using all senses – Learning through collaboration – Learning through games – And integrating with physical environment e.g. UK Futurelab – Savannah, zoo – And not confined by physical boundaries, e.g. Sungei Buloh RAdm (NS) Ronnie Tay Infocomm Development Authority of Singapore (IDA)

4 Keynote Address 2 Immersive, Collaborative Simulations and Neomillennial Learning Styles: Implications for Education Learning styles – Sensory-based, e.g. visual, – Personality-based, e.g. MBTI – Aptitude-based, e.g. MI – Media-based – ICT tool “Linear” student prefer research paper “creative” student prefer multi-media project Media shape their participants regardless of age: “Millennial styles of learning” New literacies required (Jenkin’s, Leu’s framework) “New Generation” interfaces – World to the desktop – Multi-user virtual environment – Ubiquitous computing, etc. Professor Christopher Dede Harvard University, USA Reference: Ubiquitous computing

5 Keynote Address 2 Immersive, Collaborative Simulations and Neomillennial Learning Styles: Implications for Education Handheld Augmented Reality Project (HARP) – “Aliens landed outside school” scenario for Maths and EL trail using handheld devices, presentation of investigations to class – With multimedia interactions – Students come within 20 ft of GPS points, “interactions” activated Powerful pedagogical models – Guided inquiry learning with active construction of knowledge etc. Situated Learning – Constellations of architectural, social, organisational, and material vectors that aid in learning Distributed-Learning communities Professor Christopher Dede Harvard University, USA Reference: HARP

6 Keynote Address 2 Immersive, Collaborative Simulations and Neomillennial Learning Styles: Implications for Education “Tour of River City” – Avatar moving in a virtual city tour with interactive features – Team research on virus problem in virtual town A different model of pedagogy – Experiences central (knowledge for assimilation or synthesis) – Knowledge is situated in a context and distributed across a community – Reputation, experiences and accomplishments as measures of quality Distributed learning course – variety of pedagogies used Professor Christopher Dede Harvard University, USA

7 Keynote Address 2 Immersive, Collaborative Simulations and Neomillennial Learning Styles: Implications for Education Communities of “Unlearning” – Developing fluency in using emerging interactive media – Complementing presentational instruction with collaborative inquiry- based learning – Unlearning almost unconsciously. Beyond McLuhan – Media shape their messages and participants – Infrastructures shape civilization Professor Christopher Dede Harvard University, USA

8 Keynote Address Vision of Future Learning 21 st Century Challenges – Digital lifestyle – an opportunity to engage students in learning – The connected learner – A shift in focus Learning can occur everywhere – Embracing the whole child understanding all aspects of the learner Programmability drives child- centeredness – Increases interactivity and effectiveness of communication – Addresses learner diversity and increase learner adaptability – “The more powerful technology becomes, the more indispensable good teachers are” [Fulan, ‘98] Mr Bruce Dixon Chairman Microsoft Worldwide Education International Advisory Board Microsoft Corporation

9 Keynote Address Vision of Future Learning The more powerful technology becomes, the more indispensable good teachers are Learners must construct their own understanding – [Fulan, ‘98] Personalisation means – Obtaining information from the right place, using the right device, at the right time, right place… Transparency in assessment – parents aware of teachers comments on tests Mr Bruce Dixon Chairman Microsoft Worldwide Education International Advisory Board Microsoft Corporation

10 Keynote Address Vision of Future Learning Learning 2020: a vision for lifelong learning: – Intelligent toys – Game-based learning – 1 student to 1 adult (kid’s wish to Peter Senge) - Collaboration, global, changing the model of 1 teacher to a class of students – “Learning coaches” – Virtual mentors – Embedded assessment e.g. Ancient Spaces – creations handed over to the next batch, peer reviewed – Immersive Virtual Learning Users create, collaborate, play, explore and learn – Global tutor network Mr Bruce Dixon Chairman Microsoft Worldwide Education International Advisory Board Microsoft Corporation

11 Keynote Address Vision of Future Learning Imagine the future … – Learning in school is as transparent as out of school – Meaningful collaboration – Seamless access Mr Bruce Dixon Chairman Microsoft Worldwide Education International Advisory Board Microsoft Corporation

12 Track 2A Serious Games for Learning Introduction Interactive Digital Media (IDM) Web 2.0 culture: – Pull, learner-centred School Culture: – Push, teacher-centred Mr Thomas Lim Director IDA

13 Track 2A Serious Games for Learning (i) Industry sharing on Development of Games for Learning What’s special about video games now? – Wide social distribution and acceptance – Pervasive and sophisticated technology – Cheaper and more prevalent hardware – Better leveraging of economies of scale Serious games – For non-entertainment purposes Games in education – Persuasion tool (not useful) – Utilization of game technology Vicarious learning Simulation study Electronic toys – Educational technology Game-based learning Mr Siddharth Jain Chief Creative Director Playware Studios Asia, Singapore

14 Track 2A Serious Games for Learning (i) Industry sharing on Development of Games for Learning Why we play? – Genetic selection of players – Refinement of life skills and object use – Instinctive response to tedium What is a game? – Well defined objectives, meaningful choices, clear & fair rules, safe environment, emergent systems (e.g. traffic jams arise out of roads created) Serious games in history – Xiangqi – teach Sun Tzu’s Principles of War Less than 5 % games succeed – More user investment – more brain engagement – Users more choosy Mr Siddharth Jain Chief Creative Director Playware Studios Asia, Singapore

15 Track 2A Serious Games for Learning (i) Industry sharing on Development of Games for Learning Pedagogy in Edutainment – Incremental learning – Distributed learning – Deep learning Learn by doing Learn by experimenting Life-like learning situations Mr Siddharth Jain Chief Creative Director Playware Studios Asia, Singapore

16 Track 2A Serious Games for Learning (ii) Sharing on a History and Geography Game developed in Singapore The Singapore Youth of Today 1.Consumer 2.Causes 3.Cheek 4.Connectivity 5.Choices Using TLLM, PETALS Features of games – Summit on Educational Games Report p. 18 (Federation of American Scientists) Summit on Educational Games Report Ms Angeline Jude Yeo Curriculum Specialist Ms Ang Ling See Curriculum Planning Officer MOE

17 Track 2A Serious Games for Learning (ii) Sharing on a History and Geography Game developed in Singapore Conceptualisation of game 1.Target level 2.Topic – which aspects 3.Strengths and limitations of existing pedagogies 4.Strengths and limitations of existing assessment in measuring students’ understanding 5.Gaps which needed to be plugged Development – some challenges – Conversation – Vendors – what we look for? – Clear definition of roles between curriculum officers and vendor – Research on actual history – Feedback refinement (continuous iteration) – Content accuracy – Fit of purpose – Classroom use and context Ms Angeline Jude Yeo Curriculum Specialist Ms Ang Ling See Curriculum Planning Officer MOE

18 Track 1B Leadership for Development of 21st Century Skills (i) Measuring The Value of Educational Technologies In Schools International Project Research: International VOI Project – Value of Investment (VOI) – To measure the value of educational technologies in schools – To enable stakeholders to plan and make an informed decision on use of resources for ICT Intangible assets are more important than tangible assets Survey on teachers, students in 3 schools with high ICT usage, one each in USA, UK and Australia. Preliminary attempt to measure the value of educational technologies. Details of research methodology on the website of VOI project. Mr Keith Krueger CEO, Consortium of School Network, USA Reference: VOI Project with case studiesVOI Project

19 Track 1B Leadership for Development of 21st Century Skills (ii) From Addition to Assimilation: How teachers’ conceive and practice ‘ICT integration’ Measuring how frequently ICT is used is a poor measurement of effectiveness or integration. Better questions on purpose of ICT integration – Curriculum, collaboration, cognition, creative, computer literacy – New use of ICT Research: Teachers were interviewed on their perceptions of ICT integration Dr Vince Ham Director Research CORE Education, New Zealand

20 Track 1B Leadership for Development of 21st Century Skills (ii) From Addition to Assimilation: How teachers’ conceive and practice ‘ICT integration’ “Tests” of effective integration – Ubiquity How many ICTs: how often? Range of curricular goals? – Challenge Are ICTs providing appropriate challenges for the learner? (not – Accessibility (for management) How accessible are ICTs and support? – Prominence (attitude) How taken for granted are ICTs? – Connectedness With other learning? With my teaching beliefs? (Am I practising what I preach?) Continuum: – Addition > incorporation > integration > assimilation Dr Vince Ham Director Research CORE Education, New Zealand

21 Track 1B Leadership for Development of 21st Century Skills (ii) From Addition to Assimilation: How teachers’ conceive and practice ‘ICT integration’ Current tools and frameworks for evaluating ICT integration? – What criteria do they use? – What will make them useful to teachers? Focus on classroom practices instead of use of ICTs. E-P-S for ICT (survey tool) – Educational Positioning System for ICT – An EPS map for each teacher’s self- evaluation: see Personal EPS Map!Personal EPS Map Dr Vince Ham Director Research CORE Education, New Zealand

22 Reflections Some implications – Review KPIs for use of ICT – Raising the awareness and understanding of ICT integration – Teamwork to design ICT integrated lesson modules – Instead of % use, consider EPS for individual teachers – VOI as a tool to review school ICT investment Wireless network in Republic Polytechnic – This slides were prepared and links searched and inserted during the talks at the lecture hall with wireless network access.


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