Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Tuesday, November 29 Today’s Agenda: 1. Bellringer: Identify Literary Terms 2. Review Parallel Structure in “I Hear America Singing” 3. Model SOAPSTone.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Tuesday, November 29 Today’s Agenda: 1. Bellringer: Identify Literary Terms 2. Review Parallel Structure in “I Hear America Singing” 3. Model SOAPSTone."— Presentation transcript:

1 Tuesday, November 29 Today’s Agenda: 1. Bellringer: Identify Literary Terms 2. Review Parallel Structure in “I Hear America Singing” 3. Model SOAPSTone using Dickinson’s Poem 4. Pair Share: Analyze “I Hear America Singing” using SOAPSTone 5. Introduce Requirements for Catalog Poem HW: 1) Catalog Poem #1 due Wednesday (11/30) 2) Print out slides 14-15

2 Take out a sheet of paper and title: Bellringer: Week of 11/28 – 12/2 Monday (11/28): 1. Catalog – a list of things, people, or events 2. alliteration – the repetition of similar consonant sounds 3. assonance – the repetition of similar vowel sounds 4. onomatopoeia – the use of words whose sounds echo their meaning 5. parallel structure – the repetition of phrases, clauses, or sentences that have the same grammatical structure.

3 Bellringer: Week of 11/28 – 12/2 Tuesday (11/29): 1. They twirl through the trek / tumbling towards the tide. _____________ 2. Poetry is old, ancient, goes back far. _________ 3. Snow quickly melting / Air slowly warming / Life coming from the trees. ____________ alliteration assonance catalog

4 Identifying Parallel Structure Parallel StructureExamples from the Poem Repetition of Words Repetition of phrases Repetition of sentence patterns

5 Take out your print outs of the slides: SoapStone: Analyzing Poetry S peaker: Who is the speaker of the poem? What assumptions can you make about the speaker? (ex. age, gender, class, emotional state, etc.) O ccasion: What is the occasion? What promoted the author to write this piece? Is it a memory, a description, an observation, a valedictory, an argument, an elegy, a declaration, a critique, etc.? A udience: Who is the audience? Which group of readers to whom is this piece directed? What assumptions can you make about the intended audience?

6 SoapStone: Analyzing Poetry P urpose: What is the speaker’s purpose? In what ways does the poet convey this message? What is the message? How does the speaker try to spark a reaction in the audience? How is the poem supposed to make the audience feel? S ubject: What is the subject of the piece? The general topic, content, and ideas contained in the poem. How do you know this? TONE : What is the author’s attitude toward the subject? What emotional sense do you take from this piece? How does the diction point to tone? Give a specific example.

7 Analyzing Dickinson using SoapsTONE A door just opened on a street– I, lost, was passing by– An instant's width of warmth disclosed And wealth, and company. The door as sudden shut, and I, I, lost, was passing by,-- Lost doubly, but by contrast most, Enlightening misery.

8 Analyzing “I Hear America Singing” (1) I hear America singing, the varied carols I hear, (2) Those mechanics, each one singing his as it should be blithe and strong, (3) The carpenter singing his as he measures his plank or beam, (4) The mason singing his as he makes ready for work, or leaves off work, (5) The boatman singing what belongs to him in his boat, the deckhand singing on the steamboat deck,

9 Analyzing “I Hear America Singing” (6) The shoemaker singing as he sits on his bench, the hatter singing as he stands, (7) The wood-cutter’s song, the plowboy’s on his way in the morning, or at noon intermission or at sundown, (8) The delicious singing of the mother, or of the young wife at work, or of the girl sewing or washing, (9) Each singing what belongs to him or her and to none else, (10) The day belongs to the day—at the night the party of young fellows, robust, friendly, (11) Singing with open mouths their strong melodious songs.

10 Example of Catalog Poem: Fear By Raymond Carver Fear of seeing a police car pull into the drive. Fear of falling asleep at night. Fear of not falling asleep. Fear of the past rising up. Fear of the present taking flight. Fear of the telephone that rings in the dead of night. Fear of electrical storms. Fear of the cleaning woman who has a spot on her cheek! Fear of dogs I’ve been told won’t bite. Fear of anxiety! Fear of having to identify the body of a dead friend. Fear of running out of money. Fear of having too much, though people will not believe this. Fear of psychological profiles. Fear of being late and fear of arriving before anyone else.

11 Example of Catalog Poem: Fear By Raymond Carver Fear of my children’s handwriting on envelopes. Fear they’ll die before I do, and I’ll feel guilty. Fear of having to live with my mother in her old age, and mine. Fear of confusion. Fear this day will end on an unhappy note. Fear of waking up to find you gone. Fear of not loving and fear of not loving enough. Fear that what I love will prove lethal to those I love. Fear of death. Fear of living too long. Fear of death. I’ve said that.

12 Take out a sheet of paper and title: Ideas for Catalog Poem List of Human Emotions List of Favorite Emotions sadness frustration Confusion about growing up

13 Turn to the back side of your paper on Ideas for Catalog Poem and title: Catalog Poem #1 This is where you will write your catalog poem. Good luck and be creative!

14 Requirements for Catalog Poem Has 25 lines (no more no less; EXACTLY TWENTY-FIVE!) Each line begins in the same way, until you reach the ending. Each line is vivid and descriptive, presenting one clear image. Each word is chosen carefully and means precisely what you intend it to mean. (DICTION!!!)

15 Requirements for Catalog Poem The ending offers a sort of “twist” that expresses the ultimate essence of the poem. There is an overall rhythm to the poem that allows it to flow when read aloud. The title of the poem is the emotion which is its subject. The final draft is carefully proofread with all errors in the spelling, grammar, and mechanics corrected.


Download ppt "Tuesday, November 29 Today’s Agenda: 1. Bellringer: Identify Literary Terms 2. Review Parallel Structure in “I Hear America Singing” 3. Model SOAPSTone."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google