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The Tragedy of Romeo and Juliet Quotes to know…. “I do but keep the peace: put up thy sword Or manage it to part these men with me.”

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Presentation on theme: "The Tragedy of Romeo and Juliet Quotes to know…. “I do but keep the peace: put up thy sword Or manage it to part these men with me.”"— Presentation transcript:

1 The Tragedy of Romeo and Juliet Quotes to know…

2 “I do but keep the peace: put up thy sword Or manage it to part these men with me.”

3 -Benvolio, I.i.60-61

4 “O, where is Romeo?-saw you him to-day?- Right glad I am that he was not at this fray.”

5 Lady Montague, I.i

6 “Here’s much to do with hate, but more with love:- Why, then, O brawling love! O loving hate! O anything of nothing first create!”

7 Romeo, I.i

8 “By giving liberty unto thine eyes; Examine other beauties.”

9 Benvolio, I.i

10 “Oh teach me how I should forget to think.”

11 Romeo, I.i.218

12 “I’ll look to like if looking liking move: But no more deep will I endart mine eye Than your consent gives strength to make it fly.”

13 Juliet, I.iii.97-99

14 “A man, young lady! Lady, such a man As all the world—why he is a man of wax.”

15 Nurse, I.iii.75-76

16 “I’ll look to like if looking liking move: But no more deep will I endart mine eye Than your consent gives strength to make it fly.”

17 Juliet, I.iii.97-99

18 “You are a lover; borrow Cupid’s wings, And soar with them above a common bound.”

19 Mercutio, I.iv.17-18

20 “It seems she hangs upon the cheek of night Like a rich jewel in an Ethiop’s ear; Beauty too rich for use, for earth too dear!”

21 Romeo, I.v.42-45

22 “I will withdraw: but this intrusion shall, Now seeming sweet, convert to bitter gall.”

23 Tybalt, I.v

24 “See how she leans her cheek upon her hand! O I were a glove upon that hand, That I might touch that cheek!”

25 Romeo, II.ii.23-25

26 “What’s in a name? that which we call a rose By any other name would smell as sweet;”

27 Juliet, II.ii.43-44

28 “With loves light wings did I o’erperch these walls;”

29 “With loves light wings did I o’erperch these walls” Romeo, II.ii.66

30 “Thou knowest the mask of night is on my face; Else would a maiden blush bepaint my cheek For that which thou has heard me speak to-night.”

31 Juliet, II.ii.85-87

32 “Yet I should kill thee with much cherishing.”

33 Juliet, II.ii.185

34 “Virtue itself turns vice, being misapplied; And vice sometimes by action dignified. Within the infant rind of this small flower Poison hath residence, and medicine power; For this being smelt, with that part cheers each part; Being tasted slays all senses with the heart.”

35 Friar, II.iii.21-26

36 “Be plain, good son, and homely in thy drift; Riddling confession finds but riddling shrift.”

37 Friar, II.iii.55-56

38 “I pray thee chide me not: she whom I love now Doth grace for grace and love for love allow”

39 Romeo, II.iii.85-86

40 “More than the prince of cats, I can tell you.”

41 Mercutio, II.iv.18

42 “A gentleman, nurse that loves to hear himself talk; and will speak more in a minute than he will stand to in a month.”

43 Romeo, II.iv

44 “…if ye should lead her into a fool’s paradise, as they say…”

45 Nurse, II.iv

46 “These violent delights have violent ends.”

47 Friar, II.vi.9

48 “Thou would quarrel with a man for cracking nuts, having no other reason but because thou hast hazel eyes…”

49 Mercutio, III.i.19-20

50 “I do protest I never injur’d thee; But love thee better than thou canst devise”

51 Romeo, III.i.65-66

52 “No, ‘tis not so deep as a well, nor so wide as a church door; but tis enough, ‘twill serve”

53 Mercutio, III.i.93-94

54 “…or if love be blind, It best agrees with night-Come, civil night, Thou sober-suited matron, all in black…”

55 Juliet, III.ii.9-11

56 “O Tybalt, Tybalt, the best friend I had!”

57 Nurse, III.ii.61

58 “O serpent heart with a flowering face! Did ever dragon keep so fair a cave?”

59 Juliet, III.ii.73-74

60 “Ha, banishment? Be merciful, say ‘death;’ For exile hath more terror in his look, much more than death; do not say ‘banishment.’”

61 Romeo, III.iii.12-14

62 “Be patient for the world is broad and wide.”

63 Friar, III.iii.16

64 “O, then I see that madmen have no ears.”

65 Friar, III.iii.61

66 “A pack of blessings lights upon thy back; Happiness courts thee in her best array; But, like a misbehav’d and sullen wench, Thou pout’st upon thy fortune and thy love;- Take heed, take heed, for such die miserable.”

67 Friar, III.iii

68 “Monday! ha ha! Well, Wednesday is too soon, Thursday let it be…”

69 Capulet, III.iv.19-20

70 “Yond light is not daylight, I know it, I; It is some meteor that the sun exhales To be to thee this night a torch-bearer And light thee on the way to Mantua; Therefore stay yet, thou need’st not to be gone”

71 Juliet, III.v.12-16

72 “O God! I have an ill-divining soul! Methinks I see thee, now thour art below, As one dead in the bottom of a tomb: Either my eyesight fails, or thou look’st pale.”

73 “O God! I have an ill-divining soul! Methinks I see thee, now thou art below, As one dead in the bottom of a tomb: Either my eyesight fails, or thou look’st pale.” Juliet, III.v.54-57

74 “What wilt thou wash him from his grave with tears? An if thou couldst, thou could not make him live; Therfore have done: some grief shows much of love; But much grief shows still some want of wit.”

75 Lady Capulet, III.v.70-73

76 “Villain and he be many miles asunder.-”

77 Juliet, III.v.81

78 “An you be mine, I’ll give you to my friend; And you be not, hang, beg, starve, die i’ the streets, For, by my soul, I’ll ne’er acknowledge thee,”

79 Capulet, III.v

80 “Immoderately she weeps for Tybalt’s death, And therefore have I little talk’d of love; For Venus smiles not in a house of tears.”

81 Paris, IV.i.6-8

82 “ I will confess to you that I love him.”

83 Juliet, IV.i.25

84 “I’ll have this knot knit up to-morrow morning.”

85 Capulet, IV.ii.24

86 “Death is my son-in-law, death is my heir”

87 Capulet, IV.v.40

88 “I dreamt that my lady came and found me dead,- Strange dream, that gives a man leave to think!-”

89 Romeo, V.i.6-7

90 “Than she is well and nothing can be ill; Her body sleeps in Capel’s monument, And her immortal part with angels lives.”

91 Balthasar, V.i.17-19

92 “My poverty, but not my will consents.”

93 Apothecary, V.i.75

94 “There is thy gold; worse poison to men’s souls, Doing more murders in this loathsome world Than these poor compounds that you mayst not sell;”

95 Romeo, V.i.80-82

96 “…If thou be merciful, Open the tomb, lay me with Juliet.”

97 Paris, V.iii.72-73

98 “Death, that hath suck’d the honey of thy breath, Hath had no power yet upon thy beauty; Thou art not conquer’d…”

99 Romeo, V.iii.92-94

100 “O churl! drink all, and left no friendly drop To help me after?”

101 Juliet, V.iii

102 “For I will give thee more: For I will raise her statue in pure gold.”

103 Montague, V.iii

104 “For never was a story of more woe Than this of Juliet and her Romeo.”

105 Prince, V.iii


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