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Analytical Chemistry Division 2014. Analytical Chemistry Not JUST titrations! Not JUST titrations! We’re doing research in topics as diverse as better.

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Presentation on theme: "Analytical Chemistry Division 2014. Analytical Chemistry Not JUST titrations! Not JUST titrations! We’re doing research in topics as diverse as better."— Presentation transcript:

1 Analytical Chemistry Division 2014

2 Analytical Chemistry Not JUST titrations! Not JUST titrations! We’re doing research in topics as diverse as better batteries, labs-on-chips, forensics, explosives detection and degradation, and better body armor. We’re doing research in topics as diverse as better batteries, labs-on-chips, forensics, explosives detection and degradation, and better body armor. We use almost every instrument you’ve seen plus some. We use almost every instrument you’ve seen plus some. Two of the departments’ scanning probe instruments are in the Analytical Division. Two of the departments’ scanning probe instruments are in the Analytical Division.

3 Analytical Chemistry Members CDR Rob Calhoun CDR Rob Calhoun Professor Graham Cheek Professor Graham Cheek Professor Christine Copper Professor Christine Copper Professor Judith Hartman Professor Judith Hartman Associate Professor Dianne Luning Prak Associate Professor Dianne Luning Prak Professor Dan O’Sullivan Professor Dan O’Sullivan Professor Maria Schroeder Professor Maria Schroeder Associate Professor Ron Siefert Associate Professor Ron Siefert Professor Paul Trulove Professor Paul Trulove

4 RESEARCH INTERESTS Prof. G. Cheek Mi 144 36625 Solvents : Ionic liquids, water, acetonitrile Forensic Applications 1. Soil Characterization : X-Ray Fluorescence 2. Paper / Ink Characterization : Raman Spectroscopy

5 RESEARCH INTERESTS Prof. G. Cheek Effect of Lewis acids on organic reactions + Yb(TfO) 3 Ionic liquid BMPY TfO Use of NMR, UV-VIS ? Bio-electrochemistry of amino acids - 2 e - - 2 H + cysteine cystine also dipeptides ?

6 Prof Christine Copper ccopper@usna.edu Michelson 265 project will also include collaboration with scientists at the Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, D.C. or at Drexel University ccopper@usna.edu Development of Separation and Detection Methods for Environmentally Important Molecules

7 Capillary Electrophoresis (CE) * Separation is achieved based on different rates of migration of charged species in an applied electric field. CE was first used in the early 1980’s. Reasonably high sensitivity (ppm or ppb) Short separation time (<5 min) Small Sample Volume (nanoliters) Can be done on a microchip device instead of in a column

8 Instrumentation This automated instrument can run samples when you are not there! CE instrument is in MI 264.

9 Capillary Electrophoresis can be used to detect… Explosives in seawater Poisons in beverages Ozone in submarine atmospheres Nerve agents in atmospheres Polyaromatic hydrocarbons in environmental samples Carbon monoxide poisoning in blood Illicit drugs in urine Current students: Micala Migneault and Clay Aronica

10 Midn 1/C Sarah Alexandre http://greenfleet.dodlive.mil/energy/great-green-fleet/ Midn 1/C Sarah Alexandre http://greenfleet.dodlive.mil/energy/great-green-fleet/ Fuel certification program/Office of Naval Research Goal: Analysis and testing of alternative fuels: density, viscosity, surface tension, speed of sound, bulk modulus, flash point, enthalpy of combustion (bomb calorimetry) Alexandre, S. M., Luning Prak, D. J., Alexandre, S. M., Cowart, J. S., Trulove, P.C., “Density, Viscosity, Speed of Sound, Bulk Modulus, Surface Tension, and Flash Point of Binary Mixtures of N-Dodecane with 2,2,4,6,6- Pentamethylheptane or 2,2,4,4,6,8,8-Heptamethylnonane” submitted to J. Chem. Eng. Data, 1/14 July 19-20, 2012 demonstration successfully evaluated the performance of “drop in replacement” advanced biofuel [50-50 mixtures of biofuel (made from used cooking oil and algae) and petroleum-based marine diesel or aviation fuel. ] Assoc. Prof. Dianne Luning Prak (prak@usna.edu) & Prof. Paul Trulove prak@usna.edu

11 Milewski, E.A., Jedlicka, E.E., Kersey, A.J Luning Prak, D.J., Milewski, E.A., Jedlicka, E.E., Kersey, A.J., O’Sullivan, D.W., 2013, “Influence of pH, Temperature, Salinity, and Dissolved Organic Matter on the Photolysis of 2,4-dinitrotoluene and 2,6-dinitrotoluene in Seawater,” Marine Chemistry, 157, 233-241. How does the photolysis behavior of munitions constituents in marine systems differ from that in fresh water systems? · salinity · nitrate · dissolved organic matter Unexploded Ordnance in shallow waters Photolysis of munitions constituents http://http://www.SERDP.org Midn 1/C James Breuer HPLC with autosampler SUNSHINE LAB Solar Simulator Project involves · preparing solutions · using solar simulator · analyzing samples with HPLC · identifying products solid-phase extraction, LC/MS

12 Professor Schroeder’s Research Interests Harold Edgerton, photographer -Improved Polymer Coatings for: -Military Transport (Humvees) -Body Armor -Hazardous Material Transport (DTRA) -Transparent Armor (ARL) -Laboratory Development: -Experiments in support of Chemistry of Cooking course -Experiments for the IL courses Projectile hitting elastomer at > 500 mph

13 Motivation for Coatings Research To understand the mechanisms of impact protection of polymer-coated surfaces projectiles hitting elastomers at high speed protection no protection To understand temp effects (T g ) To utilize nanoparticles To improve armor protection  Polymer synthesis, characterization, processing  Engineering, physical and mechanical testing  Materials Science  Ballistic testing  Basic research with military applications

14 Continuing Student Project (DTRA) Protective Coatings for Hazardous Material Transport Research Collaboration: Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) Train Derailment – Lac-Megantic, Quebec 74 train cars containing crude oil 42 persons killed, 30 buildings destroyed July 6, 2013 Current Research Student 1/C Philip Solt North Dakota Dec 31, 2013

15 Ron Siefert Associate Professor 3-6336 (office), Mi-243 (office), Mi-240 (lab) Iron in Marine Aerosols Vehicle NH 3 Emissions Agricultural NH 3 Emissions Current Projects / Development of Nanoporous Sorbent Materials Deposition of Nutrients to Surface Waters Novel Sorbents (PMOs: periodic mesoporous organisilicas) -For Analysis of Nitroenergetics (i.e, explosives) -For Analysis of Perchlorates (used as propellants) -As a substrate for catalysts to destroy contaminants Past Projects Measurements in the Chesapeake Bay

16 Enhanced Detection of Explosives and Related Compounds OBJECTIVE: Develop organosilicas as sorbents applicable to the preconcentration of nitroenergetics and perchlorates for enhancement of in situ detection techniques APPROACH: Characterize the binding characteristics (e.g., selectivity, capacity, kinetics) of imprinted PMOs for nitroenergetics and perchlorate propellants. Use of HPLC and IC. Nanoporous Photocatalysts for Decontamination of Nerve Agents Lab on a Chip Microfluidic devices using electro-osmotic flow.

17 Department of Chemistry Research Goals Develop multi-functional natural materials and coatings with unique electronic, optical, and sensing properties for Air Force and DoD relevant applications in areas such as ballistic protection, energy storage, microelectronics, stealth, laser eye protection, optical computing, chem./bio sensing, in- situ medical applications MAIN ACHIEVEMENTS  Investigated the impact co-solvent properties on the natural fiber welding process  Demonstrated Inkjet printing of ionic liquids on natural fiber substrates  Utilized Laser heating to spatially control the welding of natural fiber substrates  Developed a continuous fiber welding process to coat yarns with functional solid materials  Evaluated the electrochemical and knitting properties of yarn based supercapacitors  Studied incorporation of fire retardant materials in natural yarns via fiber welding Ionic Liquids Solvents  We have shown that ionic liquids are powerful solvents for the dissolution and processing of a wide variety of natural polymers.  The solvating ability of ionic liquids provides a powerful tool for the modification and processing of natural polymers. Natural Polymers  Natural polymers are renewable materials that have many attractive properties. Some natural silks have strength and toughness comparable to the best synthetic polymers.  The ability to modify and tailor the shape and properties of natural polymers is limited. Current Impact  Producing natural materials with dramatically enhanced mechanical properties  Enabling tuneable natural material properties with high spatial resolution  Facilitating the integration of functional solid materials with electrical, magnetic and optical properties into natural fiber matrices CH 3 COO − 17

18 Department of Chemistry Control of Natural Fiber Welding Using Inkjet Printing of Ionic Liquids Movies Obtained from Wikipedia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Micro_Piezo piezoelectric inkjet thermal inkjet 18

19 Department of Chemistry Laser Induced Natural Fiber Welding  CNC 40 W CO 2 laser with raster and/or vector operation by Full Spectrum Laser (www.fslaser.com) LaserNaturalFiberSubstrate IonicLiquid Use a Laser to Spatially Control the Welding of Ionic Liquid Coated Cotton Paper 19

20 Department of Chemistry 20 Use of Ionic Liquids to Fabricate Biopolymer Composite Materials Knitted Electrochemical Capacitors for Smart Textiles* * Collaboration with Drexel University Bamboo (0.54 mg/cm)

21 Department of Chemistry +++ Yarn Separator Yarn Electrode Knitted Linen/Bamboo/Viscose Capacitors! 21

22 Questions?


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