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N E P F N evada E ducator P erformance F ramework Southern Nevada Regional Professional Development Program www.rpdp.net Standard 4 Part 2 Secondary Mathematics.

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Presentation on theme: "N E P F N evada E ducator P erformance F ramework Southern Nevada Regional Professional Development Program www.rpdp.net Standard 4 Part 2 Secondary Mathematics."— Presentation transcript:

1 N E P F N evada E ducator P erformance F ramework Southern Nevada Regional Professional Development Program Standard 4 Part 2 Secondary Mathematics

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3 Standard 4 Module for Mathematics Part I – What and Why Goal 1: What is Standard 4? Goal 2: What are the indicators for Standard 4? Part II – Implications for Mathematics Goal 3: What activities/instruction in the classroom would provide evidence of them? Goal 4: What specific plans can be designed to implement them?

4 Teach for the transfer of learning

5 Learning is often not the outcome of all our teaching

6 Teach so students will have meaningful learning experiences

7 NEPF Standard 4 Students Engage in Metacognitive Activity to Increase Understanding of and Responsibility for Their Own Learning Teacher structures opportunities for self-monitored learning for all students. 2 Teacher and allstudents under-stand what studentsare learning, whythey are learning it,and how they willknow if they havelearned it. 1 Teacher supports allstudents to takeactions based onstudents’ own self-monitoringprocesses. 3

8 NEPF: Evidence Indicators

9 Main sources of evidence include: Mandatory Direct evaluator observation Plus at least one from other sources Other Sources Teacher pre/post conference Lesson plans Student classroom interviews Student work Student feedback (e.g., survey, writing) Teacher notes

10 Demonstrating Evidence TEACHERS In teacher planning: What plans do teachers make to include communicating goals, performance criteria, and purpose of the lesson? Do lesson plans show a variety of strategies (or specific strategies) to guide students to think about thinking? In class (teacher talk): Does teacher provide instruction to students in self-monitoring strategies? Is the teacher providing time for student strategy use, talking to students about what/why they are doing the lesson, discussing what to do next, sharing strategies with class?

11 Demonstrating Evidence STUDENTS In student work: What artifacts demonstrate self-reflection tools? Are students making margin notes, reorganizing information creating representations, or seeking assistance? Are students clear about learning goals and performance criteria? In class (student talk): How are students interacting, responding and engaged in the tasks and activities? Are students seeking assistance, conducting investigations, or revising learning strategies based on their own evaluation?

12 When students are metacognitive, they understand… 1. themselves as learners 2. a given task 3. a variety of strategies and how to use them in a variety of situations (Jetton & Dole, 2004)

13 From Research to Practice For students to understand themselves as learners: A. Teach students that their ability to learn is not a fixed quantity—they can shape their own intelligence B. Help students to understand their learning style(s) and look at the intelligences

14 Resources: Students can shape their own intelligence. Have students: Read the article “You Can Grow Your Intelligence” udents/PDF/Lesson% %20Extension%20Supplement%201%20-%20version%201.5.pdf udents/PDF/Lesson% %20Extension%20Supplement%201%20-%20version%201.5.pdf Investigate mindset (see following slides)  Watch TED video “The Power of Belief”  Reflect on the Michael Jordan Nike commercial  Discuss Math Anxiety

15 Responses to Many Situations are Based on Mindset Fixed Intelligence Mindset Response Growth Intelligence Mindset Response ChallengesAvoidEmbrace ObstaclesGive up easilyPersist Tasks Requiring Effort Fruitless to tryPath to mastery CriticismIgnore itLearn from it Success of OthersThreateningInspirational

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17 Math Anxiety When people worry about math, the brain feels the pain. Brain scans show that in those with high levels of math anxiety, the same areas of the brain that react when we feel pain, react in anticipation of doing math. The buzz in the fear center interferes with problem solving and critical thinking.

18 Who Wants to be a Millionaire? heaton-fails-at-math-on-celebrity-millionaire When watching the video, watch for 1. A contestant exhibiting math anxiety 2. The host modeling math “think aloud” The nature of the game is metacognitive! Contestants are asked to assess how confident they are in their knowledge: Yes (I’m sure that I know the answer) Phone a friend/Ask the audience (I am not positive about the correct answer )

19 How do we help students overcome math anxiety? Michael Serra gives a talk called "How to Teach Math Anxiety" at Key Curriculum Press' Ignite event at the CMC-North Asilomar conference.

20 From Research to Practice For students to understand themselves as learners: A. Teach students that their ability to learn is not a fixed quantity—they can shape their own intelligence. B. Help students to understand their learning style(s) and look at Gardner’s multiple intelligences. Possible Resources (Refer to Standard 2 Resources ) Have students: Determine their learning style preference Know that there are different “intelligences”

21 When students are metacognitive, they understand… 1. themselves as learners 2. a given task 3. a variety of strategies and how to use them in a variety of situations (Jetton & Dole, 2004)

22 Teachers need to be explicit in communicating Learning goals (What) Purpose of the lesson (Why) Performance Criteria (How students will know if they have learned it)

23 Understanding a task Engage students in establishing target and setting goals using: A. Questions for students to ask themselves as they plan, monitor and evaluate their thinking B. Wrappers C. Evaluation of test results

24 METACOGNITION consists of three basic elements: Developing a Plan of action Maintaining/monitoring the plan Evaluating the plan

25 Before - When you are developing the plan of action, ask yourself: What, in my prior knowledge, will help me with this particular task? In what direction do I want my thinking to take me? What should I do first? Why am I doing this problem? How much time do I have to complete the task?

26 During - When you are maintaining/ monitoring the plan of action, ask yourself: How am I doing? Am I on the right track? How should I proceed? What information is important to remember? Should I move in a different direction? Should I adjust the pace depending on the difficulty? What do I need to do if I do not understand?

27 After - When you are evaluating the plan of action ask yourself: How well did I do? Did my particular course of thinking produce more or less than I had expected? What could I have done differently? How might I apply this line of thinking to other problems? Do I need to go back through the task to fill in any "blanks" in my understanding? Adapted from Strategic Teaching and Reading Project Guidebook. (1995, NCREL, rev. ed.).

28 Self-Monitoring Strategies A New Tool: Wrappers Accurate self-monitoring is quite difficult. Many students are over-confident. A Wrapper is : a tool for teaching self-monitoring behavior. an activity that surrounds a pre-existing learning or assessment task and fosters students’ metacognition. a tool that can be built around (wrapped around) any pre-existing part of a course (lecture, homework, test).

29 Why Wrappers Work Time efficient (students and faculty will use them)  Students are doing the task anyway  Wrapper only adds a few minutes of time Metacognition practice is integrated with the task  Student are self-monitoring in the context where it is needed  Feedback on accuracy can be built in  Wrapper support can be gradually faded Research shows even minor interventions that frame a task in a new way can significantly change behavior

30 Lecture Wrappers How they work: Before lecture, present tips on active listening After lecture, students write 3 key ideas from lecture on index cards Instructor gives his list of 3 key ideas for students to self-check

31 Homework Wrappers How they work: Instructor creates self-assessment questions that focus on skills students should be monitoring Students answer questions just before homework Students complete homework as usual After homework, students answer similar self-assessment questions and draw their own conclusions “Now that you have completed this homework, how quickly and easily can you solve similar problems…?”

32 Exam Wrappers How they work: Upon returning a graded exam, students completed exam reflection sheet in class o Report study strategies, analyze errors, identify new approaches as needed Before the next exam, sheets returned to students for review and consideration, and students make a study plan

33 Wrapper Results Students’ responses for “key ideas” in the lecture increasingly matched the instructor’s (across 3 successive lecture wrappers): 45%, 68%, 75% Most students identified the homework wrappers as helping them to see the value in homework. It was also noted by the overconfident student that there was the need to do more. Students self-identified new approaches for exam preparation.

34 Another Strategy: Post Exam Reflection After students take exam and receive their grades, they take a few moments for reflection See the resource “Post Exam Reflection” under NEPF secondary math resources at Try to associate study habits with exam performance Encourage students to figure out what they don’t know and how to study in more effective ways

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36 Another strategy: Testing Choices Let students pick a few questions on the multiple-choice portion (say 3 of 25) that won’t be graded (a way to show students that you understand that they may not grasp everything right away). However, students must answer all questions— and to exempt a question from grading, students must give a reason they are selecting that question: “I don’t remember the material” or “I was able to narrow it down to two possibilities, but not one” or “I didn’t study this” or “I’m not confident of my answer”.

37 When students are metacognitive, they understand… 1. themselves as learners 2. a given task 3. a variety of strategies and how to use them in a variety of situations (Jetton & Dole, 2004)

38 Students Understand a Variety of Strategies The teacher should explicitly teach different strategies for “how to learn” in the following areas:  Organizing Information  Comprehending information/finding the important information  Studying information  Finding information  Thinking about information

39 Resource: Learning How to Learn Insert picture of document and where to find it.

40 Resource: Learning How to Learn

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42 Pause for reflection & discussion

43 When Teaching Metacognition Always model your own thinking Embed the strategies in the learning activity Scaffold the thinking

44 Summary

45 Students Engage in Metacognitive Activity to Increase Understanding of and Responsibility for Their Own Learning NEPF - Standard 4 Teacher structures opportunities for self-monitored learning for all students. 2 Teacher and allstudents under-stand what studentsare learning, whythey are learning it,and how they willknow if they havelearned it. 1 Teacher supports allstudents to takeactions based onstudents’ own self-monitoringprocesses. 3

46 For additional NEPF resources rpdp.net Select NEPF


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