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1 Access for all: securing education for those with physical and sensory needs Karen Deacon Director of Social Care and Further Education 1.

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Presentation on theme: "1 Access for all: securing education for those with physical and sensory needs Karen Deacon Director of Social Care and Further Education 1."— Presentation transcript:

1 1 Access for all: securing education for those with physical and sensory needs Karen Deacon Director of Social Care and Further Education 1

2 2 Before we start 2 Too fast? Unfamiliar English words or phrase Activities (simulations) You may have a disability Questions at the end

3 Key Questions Do you consider access to the environment and learning Discuss current arrangements. (KD Flip Chart Do you consider the indiduals or the class? Are you open to influence your practice 3

4 Considerations Challenge Test the theory Use the practical knowledge. 4

5 5 Overview of this workshop 5 1)An introduction 2)Explanation of the terms we will be using 3)The impact of sensory and physical needs 4)Simulation 5)Hidden issues: what to look for 6)What we can do: adaptations and support 7)Questions 8)Further reading 9)Some practical suggestions

6 6 An Introduction 6 I work for (. ( Royal National Institute of Blind People) I am also the deputy Chair of the Eden Academy Our schools and colleges cover: Communication and interaction difficulties Cognition and learning (Moderate to Severe and Profound) Social, mental and emotional health difficulties Sensory and/or physical difficulties Associated behavioral difficulties

7 7 Explanation of terms 7 Educational definitions, not medical Collective term ‘special education needs & disabilities’ (SEND), or ‘special needs’ Sensory Impairment Multi-sensory impairment (MSI) Physical disability (PD) Visual impairment (VI) Hearing impairment (HI)

8 8 Explanation of terms 8 Physical disability (PD) Physical difficulty or difficulties Physical impairment(s) or needs Any condition that permanently prevents normal body movement and/or control.

9 99 Physical disability There are many different types of physical disabilities, including: bone and joint deformities (they may not grow normally) curvature (bending) of the spine partial or full paralysis of the legs muscle weakness or tightness involuntary muscle movements (spasms) We also have many progressive and life limiting conditions within the schools. Temporary mobility issues due to medical conditions Tube feeding is common too

10 10 Physical disability Issues with: posture (the ability to put the body in a chosen position and keep it there) movement of body parts or the whole body (motor control) difficulties with bowel and bladder control balance and co-ordination talking and eating touching (tactile issues) The person may also have communication difficulties or other medical conditions such as epilepsy or asthma. Can include sight or hearing loss

11 11 Physical disability There are many different causes for physical disabilities. These include: inherited or genetic disorders, such as muscular dystrophy conditions present at birth (congenital), such as spina bifida serious illness affecting the brain, nerves or muscles, such as meningitis spinal cord injury Acquired brain injury injury to other parts of the body Degenerative conditions such Retts. Causes

12 12 Explanation of terms 12 Hearing impairment (HI) Deaf Hearing loss Hard of hearing Sensory Impairment Complete hearing loss Partial hearing loss Fluctuating hearing loss Inability to hear above certain sound levels or frequencies Inability to discriminate sounds from background noise Autism associated with sound sensitivity

13 13 Hearing impairment Age Genetics Conductive and sensorineural hearing loss Damage to the brain Noise-induced hearing loss Other ear problems e.g. Tinnitus Causes

14 14 Explanation of terms 14 Visual impairment (VI) Blind Partially sighted Sight loss Sensory Impairment Visual impairment may result from: Damage to the eye Damage to the brain

15 15 Functional vision – how a child uses their sight in everyday situations. Ocular visual impairment – this means that sight problems are caused by one or more parts of the eyes not functioning properly. Cortical or cerebral visual impairment (CVI) – this is when there is nothing wrong with the eyes, but the brain doesn't process the images properly. Combination of the above two. Visual impairment Terms used

16 16 Impact in the classroom 16 Visual impairment Hearing impairment Physical disability In common: Lack of engagement with the learning process Lack of academic progress Inability to contribute Missed opportunities Social exclusion - ‘can’t join in’ Fatigue Emotional stress

17 17 Simulation Why simulate? Must avoid trivialising difficulties How does it benefit? Our awareness Our practice Volunteers only

18 18 Learning from Simulations 18 Do you know what difficulties/disabilities the children you teach may have? What does this mean for their individual learning needs? What support do I need to provide? How should WE adapt? Support Equipment (More later)

19 19 Simulation Physical disability Different options. Spend a day in a wheelchair or only sitting down Walk only with the aid of crutches But try this: If you are right-handed, try writing left-handed (and vice versa) (Volunteers) Also try it with the gloves on

20 20 Hidden issues: what to look for 20 Physical disability People often see a physical difficulty (but not always!) May hide other disabilities May also mask other abilities

21 21 Simulation Hearing impairment

22 22 Volunteers 22 Put your fingers in your ears Try to follow what the speaker (Karen) is saying Hearing impairment

23 23 Hidden issues: what to look for 23 Hearing impairment Is slow to learn to talk, or they are not clear when they speak Often asks you to repeat yourself Often talks very loudly Often turns up the volume of the TV so that it is very loud Regularly feeling tired or stressed, due to having to concentrate closely while listening Misses sound cues (e.g. end-of-lesson bells, whistles during games, verbal instructions) Watches face of speaker intently Or may withdraw completely and ‘hide’ in class Behaviour may deteriorate

24 24 Visual impairment Simulation The primary sense for learning Perhaps as much as 80% of our learning occurs visually

25 25 Visual impairment Normal vision

26 26 Visual impairment Central vision loss

27 27 Visual impairment Peripheral vision loss

28 28 Visual impairment Absolute Scotoma Visual impairment

29 29 Volunteers 29 Try on the Simspecs Note the eye condition which the glasses are simulating Look around the room and try to focus on different things Visual impairment

30 30 How many times does the butterfly touch the flower? Visual impairment فراشة

31 31 Read the text Visual impairment The point of this exercise is to demonstrate that the materials we produce for the classroom – although entirely suitable for the majority – may not always be read easily by some of our students.

32 32 Read the text Visual impairment Sometimes there are better alternatives. Less clutter

33 33 Visual impairment Sometimes there are better alternatives. Less clutter Larger font/print size

34 34 Visual impairment Sometimes there are better alternatives. Set out clearly and logically Larger font/print size Less clutter

35 35 Visual impairment Sometimes there are better alternatives. Less clutter Larger font/print size Sometimes a different coloured background or overlay Set out clearly and logically

36 36 Volunteers 36 Remove the Simspecs Visual impairment

37 37 How to guide a person with sight loss Visual impairment Guide Down stairs Chairs Going through doors Approaching doors Changing direction Up stairs

38 38 Work in pairs One person wears the blindfold to simulate sight loss The Guide will take the person for a short walk (about 4 minutes) Use the guiding techniques that you have just seen in the video Try to encounter a doorway or two, also make some left and right turns. LOOK OUT for trip hazards, sharp objects, projections, other people. Not on stairs. Not into the hotel foyer. Ensure the person you are guiding is SAFE all the time. Do not rush. No tricks! After about 4 minutes, swap roles. Visual impairment Now it’s your turn

39 39 Visual impairment As the blindfolded person, how did you feel? Safe, vulnerable, confused? As the Guide, what were you thinking? Did you anticipate problems, such as: trip hazards? obstacles to the head? Were you clear in your directions?

40 40 Hidden issues: what to look for 40 Visual impairment On entering the room, does the pupil? Respond to the light from window Respond to objects in the room Bump into any objects Respond to the room light (on or off) Respond to changes of floor surface Respond to people in the room How the pupil responds to people? Makes eye contact Smiles at another person Watches person walk across the room Turns to another person in the room Copies actions of another person

41 41 Hidden issues: what to look for 41 Visual impairment How the pupil responds to objects? Does the pupil have difficulty locating objects on a 'busy' background? Does the pupil locate objects on a high contrast background? Does the pupil recognise objects from a range of distances? Does the pupil immediately respond to an object? Does the pupil have a delayed response to an object?

42 42 Hidden issues: what to look for 42 Visual impairment How the pupil responds to a light source? Does the pupil fixate on the light source? Does the pupil respond to light source from lower visual field? Does the pupil respond to the light source from the upper visual field? Does the pupil respond to light source from left, right? Does the pupil track the light source.Does the pupil’s behaviour change? Does the pupils behaviour change from visual to tactual? Does the pupil squint? Does the pupil complain of headaches?

43 43 What we can do: adaptations & support 43 Physical disability Hearing impairment Visual impairment accessible buildings flexible teaching arrangements appropriate resources and equipment (provision of tactile and kinaesthetic materials) appropriate seating, acoustic conditioning and lighting

44 44 What we can do: adaptations & support 44 Physical disability Hearing impairment Visual impairment adaptations to the physical environment of the school adaptations to school policies and procedures access to alternative or augmented forms of communication

45 45 What we can do: adaptations & support 45 Physical disability Hearing impairment Visual impairment access to different amplification systems Ipads Eye gaze technology for communication. access to low vision aids access in all areas of the curriculum through specialist aids, equipment or furniture regular and frequent access to specialist support. Therapist support

46 46

47 47 One further consideration Visual Impairment Physical Disability Hearing Impairment 47 Additional needs Learning difficulties The impact of two, or more, additional special needs

48 Examples Think of one student and how today may assist them? Willing to share Willing to influence others. 48

49 49Reflections 1)Am I more aware of the needs of students with sensory and/or physical needs? 2)Are there any students who may have sensory difficulties that we have been unaware of? 3)Am I doing enough to support these students? 4)How might I develop my practice?

50 50 Questions Hearing impairment? Visual impairment? Physical disability?

51 51 Thank you 51

52 52Contact If you want a copy of this presentation sent to you by , please contact me (Karen Deacon) at:

53 53 treatment/identify-hearing-loss/Hearing-Loss- Simulator treatment/identify-hearing-loss/Hearing-Loss- Simulator gy/hearing_loss_simulation/two_minute_walk. html gy/hearing_loss_simulation/two_minute_walk. html research-hub-research-reports/evidence- based-reviews research-hub-research-reports/evidence- based-reviews 53 Hearing impairmentSimulation

54 54 ex.html ex.html etterdesign2/simsoftware/simsoftware. html etterdesign2/simsoftware/simsoftware. html 54 Visual impairment Simulation The primary sense for learning


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