Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Human Rights Projects: Guidelines for Scientists and Human Rights Organizations HITA workshop October 14, 2012.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Human Rights Projects: Guidelines for Scientists and Human Rights Organizations HITA workshop October 14, 2012."— Presentation transcript:

1 Human Rights Projects: Guidelines for Scientists and Human Rights Organizations HITA workshop October 14, 2012

2 Outline History - How the Guidelines Originated Goal and Objectives Overview Contributors Status

3 History Collaborative Effort Physicians for Human Rights and AAAS Scientific Responsibility, Human Rights and Law Program Physicians For Human Rights International Forensics Program Stefan Schmitt Desire to implement policies / procedures / manage expectations AAAS Scientific Responsibility, Human Rights and Law Program Area of Activity IV: Service to the Human Rights Community Bridging the scientific, engineering, health and human rights communities - engagement of scientists, engineers and health professionals in efforts to advance human rights. Folks with lessons learned – Year and a half

4

5 Outline of the Guidelines Part I ◦ Introduction and Purpose Part II ◦ Role of Scientists in Human Rights Projects Part III ◦ Managing Expectations Part IV ◦ Additional Resources

6 Goal of the Guidelines Support a mutually beneficial relationship between scientist and the human rights organization.

7 Objectives of the Guidelines Define human rights and outline the role of scientists in human rights projects. Present important points to consider: ◦ Before both the scientist and the human rights organization initiate a project ◦ While they are working on the project ◦ What they should do when the project is complete

8 Outline of the Guidelines Introduction ◦ Purpose of the Guidelines  Promote and support a mutually beneficial relationship between scientists and human rights organizations ◦ Who is a Scientist?  Comprehensive term for anyone educated and trained in organizing knowledge in the form of testable predictions and explanations about the world.  Technical and subject matter expert in the social, behavioral, physical, and life sciences  Expert in the applied sciences and technical fields such as engineering, economics, statistics, medicine, healthcare, and information techn ◦ Why Science and Technology?  The objective, analytic nature of scientific evidence makes it a valuable tool ◦ Why Human Rights?  Rights that all humans enjoy simply by nature of being human. Among these are the right to:  free expression, fair trial, fullest attainable health, education, benefit from scientific progress, and more.

9 Outline of the Guidelines Role of Scientists in Human Rights Projects ◦ Roles and responsibilities of scientists acting as scientific experts ◦ Maintaining scientific standards in reaching findings Managing Expectations ◦ Finding a Partner Scientist or Human Rights Organization (HRO) ◦ Professional/Scientific Responsibilities ◦ Developing Project Expectations ◦ Implications for Stakeholders ◦ Use of Project Materials and Findings ◦ Considerations for Working On-site with Human Rights Organizations ◦ Communication Strategies in Advocacy Additional Resources

10 Example Section 3.2.1Conflicts of Interest Human rights projects can swiftly move into the media and be heavily scrutinized. A seemingly small project can quickly balloon into a media attraction. It is important that the scientist notifies their employer/institution of their potential involvement in the project, receives approval, and works within the terms of their employment. Questions the Scientist Should Consider Asking ◦ What type of Conflict of Interest Policy does my institution have? ◦ What type of conflict of interest might I have in working with this HRO? Questions the HRO Should Consider Asking ◦ What type of work has the scientist done in the past that may cause them to have a conflict of interest? ◦ Has the scientist received approval from their employer to work on the project?

11 Example Section Publication and Reports An important question that needs to be answered is “What are the expectations/policies of the HRO and the scientist with regard to final deliverables and publications?” Understanding this before the work begins may save considerable time and resources. During the editing process, information may be inadvertently changed. To avoid such changes, the scientist should have some say as the data is released.

12 Example Section Publication and Reports An important question that needs to be answered is “What are the expectations/policies of the HRO and the scientist with regard to final deliverables and publications?” Understanding this before the work begins may save considerable time and resources. During the editing process, information may be inadvertently changed. To avoid such changes, the scientist should have some say as the data is released.

13 Questions the Scientist Should Consider Asking ◦ What is the review process of the data and results? ◦ What will be the format of the final deliverables? ◦ How do I maintain scientific integrity of the data and results? Questions the HRO Should Consider Asking ◦ How will the findings be published? ◦ Who will perform the formatting, review, and publication? ◦ What kind of scientific review does the scientist recommend?

14 How to Use the Guidelines 224 questions Framework for discussion Increase awareness Minimize risk

15 Contributors Amanda Sozer, Ph.D. Stefan Schmitt, M.S. Jessica Wyndham, L.L.M. Anne Alexander, Ph.D. Arbie Goings, A.A.S Mark Logsdon, M.S. Jennifer Makrides, M.A. Brendan Sozer, B.A. Patricia Van Arnum Nicole Inacio Vanacek, B.S.

16 Next Steps Additional Formatting Available at: cts/guidelines/Scientists_Human_Rights_ Orgs.pdf

17 Questions?


Download ppt "Human Rights Projects: Guidelines for Scientists and Human Rights Organizations HITA workshop October 14, 2012."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google