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Building Values of Compassionate Justice: A school’s quest to align core business and philanthropy The CIRCLE Culture Capture Process CASE APAC March 2014.

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Presentation on theme: "Building Values of Compassionate Justice: A school’s quest to align core business and philanthropy The CIRCLE Culture Capture Process CASE APAC March 2014."— Presentation transcript:

1 Building Values of Compassionate Justice: A school’s quest to align core business and philanthropy The CIRCLE Culture Capture Process CASE APAC March 2014

2 About Dr Phil and CIRCLE Dr Philip SA Cummins Managing Director – CIRCLE, Consultant, Presenter, Thought Leader, Author, Textbook Writer, Syllabus Writer, PhD in Australian History Teaching and working in and with schools since 1988 Held most positions in school executive teams including leadership, advancement, business office, curriculum and pastoral care positions Adjunct Associate Professor, Faculty of Education, University of Tasmania CIRCLE – The Centre for Innovation, Research, Creativity and Leadership in Education Supporting over 1,250 schools and other organisations nationally and internationally for 30 years as CIRCLE and CSM Supporting clients through Consult + Solve, Track + Perform, Train + Develop, Research + Publish, Catalyst Educational Software, Boxworks Publications Key relationships with universities, school associations and professional groups Significant work in school improvement, advice to government, governance, strategy, advancement, curriculum development, professional learning, executive leadership development | | www.circle.org.au

3 Today we will talk about … 1.An understanding of philanthropy 2.Building a shared vocabulary of values, service and philanthropy 3.Using Culture Capture tools to reinforce a culture of philanthropy

4 So what is this philanthropy thing in a school?

5 Philanthropy Concept: Love of mankind/humanity Actions: Giving sacrificially … Love Labour Time Money What else? Outcomes: Contributing passionately, practically and consistently towards the welfare of others across all dimensions of school life… Education Everything else that supports education

6 The social function of schools? Social Agency Acting in the interests of the public good Prescribing and enforcing public order Community standards Concern about the youth of today in a world gone to the dogs? Individual Agency Modeling values Experimenting with structure Negotiating a social contract Concern about stifling individuality in a climate of political correctness gone mad? Managing fear and mistrust?

7 Isn’t this getting a little high falutin’ already?

8 Why is it important for advancement professionals in schools to care about and encourage a broader culture of philanthropy and service? It’s more than just a series of good news stories … It’s more than just a spike to the bottom line … It’s about building a community with a sustainable culture of giving all the way through school life... which means better ongoing results in advancement. It’s why we are involved in education, regardless of the specific job we do.

9 5 Assumptions about Philanthropy in Schools Reciprocity: People giving sacrificially encourages other people to give sacrificially Transference: People giving sacrificially in one area of school life leads to people giving sacrificially in other areas of school life Relevance: When one person gives, everyone wins Alignment: An educational culture of service demonstrated through student philanthropic activity promotes a culture of philanthropy in educational support Student-Centredness: When we place students at the core of activity and resist the appearance of corporate culture, people feel more comfortable about giving sacrificially

10 So how do we help build a culture of philanthropy in the educational side of schools?

11 Let’s talk about a vocabulary of values and aspirations …

12 5 Principles of Values-based Education 1.Education begins with identifying and understanding our values then placing them at the core of what it is that we do. They should be the context for and the justification of all of our actions and relationships. 2.Our values should derive from, be driven by and nurture the relationships within our community. 3.We construct our identities as individuals and as members of our community by negotiating the relevance of our values in our daily lives. 4.We need to develop and acknowledge shared values that all of our community can apply. 5.We need to encourage all community members to adopt strong personal positive moral values that align with our school’s desired values.

13 Values and Identity We construct our identities as individuals and as members of our community by negotiating the relevance of our values in our daily lives. Schools should help their students to try to answer some penetrating questions: Who am I? Where do I fit in? How might I serve others?

14 Who am I? It begins with identifying and understanding your values – your fundamental beliefs, those principles, standards and qualities which you consider to be worthwhile and desirable. The hardest thing is to be yourself in a world that is trying its best, day and night, to make you like everyone else. - ee cummings

15 Where do I fit in? It develops as we consider the context we find ourselves within. It is not the critic who counts, not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood, who strives valiantly... who knows the great enthusiasms, the great devotions, who spends himself in a worthy cause, who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement, and who at the worst, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who have never known neither victory nor defeat. - Theodore Roosevelt

16 How might I best serve others? It continues as we recognise the people and needs within our context and how our skills and values might aid those around us. I expect to pass through this world but once; any good thing therefore, that I can do, or any kindness I can show to any fellow creature, let me do it now; let me not defer or neglect it, for I shall not pass this way again. - E de Grellet

17 Let’s look at how this vocabulary can become practically embedded in the life of schools …

18 Our shared educational mission Students should: Become expert independent learners who set and achieve relevant, progressive and attainable goals Work in relationships of interdependent collaboration with their peers, teachers, families and communities Communicate effectively within and about their learning and leadership Participate in initiatives and programs that enable them to rehearse for a life of meaningful contribution, learning and service to others Earn a reputation for being passionately engaged in challenging, substantive and rewarding learning (Adapted from CIRCLE’s ongoing work with St Stephen’s School, Duncraig and Carramar, Australia)

19 How do schools say they build character and values? Leadership programs Pastoral Care programs and structures House systems Sport, especially team and physicality Co-curricular activities Outdoor education Traditions and rituals Academic program: breadth, content and rigour Social and emotional development programs Goal-setting and organisational development Conflict resolution programs Moral reasoning Virtues programs Spiritual formation Religious education Citizenship and civics Cultural exchange Boarding school Service and charity work Cross-age and mentoring programs Cadets Positive education programs Environmental care and agricultural programs Ethics programs Life skills programs Cognitive development (Adapted from CIRCLE’s ongoing work on the Measuring Character Education Project with the International Boys’ School Coalition)

20 The Quest ME US INSIDE OUTSIDE HEART HEAD From Now …… To Then Who am I?Where do I fit in?How can I best serve others? PERSONAL DIMENSION POLITICAL DIMENSION

21 The Quest A map: Values and frameworks as points of reference A compass: A servant heart A plan: A vision for who they and their world might become A pack on their back and a body hardened for the task: Character, skills, capability and knowledge that they can do it (Adapted from CIRCLE’s work on the Motivation and Engagement Project with Christ Church Grammar School, Claremont, Australia)

22 Building a culture of excellence Building change through excellence means the way in which your school community increases its willingness to strive to be the best at what it does: Understanding the context: Responding to historical perspectives of and contemporary provocations for excellence Defining the culture: Constructing a vision, frameworks, standards and goals for excellence Cultivating the passion: Building commitment to excellence and collaborating in practice (Adapted from CIRCLE’s ongoing work with The Scots College, Sydney, Australia)

23 Building a culture of philanthropy Building a culture of philanthropy means enhancing the desire, capacity and activity of the school community to give sacrificially to others: Assembling the team: Collect people who just want to contribute and add to the character and success of the enterprise Articulating the values: Constructing a framework of values of compassion and justice that are inculcated throughout the habits and actions of the members of the school community Applying the right tools: Identifying and targeting strategic programs related to service and giving (Adapted from CIRCLE’s ongoing work with Diocesan School for Girls, Waikato, New Zealand)

24 The right tools? Ask your community what really matters: –Culture Capture –Framing + Focusing Tools Focus groups (or individual calls or surveys if absolutely necessary) Simple (but profound) questions whose meaning is left up to the participants – open-ended Hugh Mackay social research methodology – ask the question, shut up and listen to the answer Usually sessions of minutes in length Aggregate like groups of stakeholder categories: students, staff, leaders, Board, parents, alumni, relevant community groups Report back in full and in summary – patterns, trends and also outstanding outlier comments

25 Culture Capture What characterises us? –Focus on identity What do we want to become? –Focus on aspiration What’s the best way to get there? –Focus on broad agency and strategy What works for us? –Focus on cultural strengths What doesn’t work for us? –Focus on cultural weaknesses How will we know when we get there? –Focus on standards, milestones and benchmarks

26 Framing + Focusing For each key concept identified from Culture Capture: How do we connect to this concept? –Focus on context, current relationships and strategies How might we nurture this concept? –Focus on potential methods for strengthening these connections What challenges do we face in connecting to this concept? –Focus on opportunities, threats, targets and barriers that we need to prepare for What might we do differently in relation to this concept? –Focus on change, change management and building a learning community to help with the necessary transitions

27 3 Things to Take Away about the Culture Capture Process 1.Honour the process: Ask the same questions every time and build them in to the processes of the whole school. 2.Keep it simple: Complicated dashboards work for a handful of us; just about anyone in your school can understand a simple matrix that is used again and again. 3.Framework = alignment: Linking everything to a common framework provides the alignment we need.

28 Then … We engage our community We promote the desired activity We communicate the stories We integrate the messages We influence the conversation And we build our specific advancement activity into the context and daily practice of our culture of sacrificial giving

29 So what do we do as advancement professionals? We support the establishment of the aims and words that describe the desired culture … We help conduct the educational and educational support activity … We go back to our community and ask the right questions … We gather data … We report back and help the culture to evolve in the way we want it to evolve with the help of our community … We target philanthropy, we build an expectation that everyone gives, we talk about it, we integrate it into our community, we amend our practice according to it, we review what we do to enhance the culture year by year. (Adapted from CIRCLE’s ongoing work with St Vincent’s College, Potts Point, Australia)

30 5 Assumptions about Philanthropy in Schools Reciprocity: People giving sacrificially encourages other people to give sacrificially Transference: People giving sacrificially in one area of school life leads to people giving sacrificially in other areas of school life Relevance: When one person gives, everyone wins Alignment: An educational culture of service demonstrated through student philanthropic activity promotes a culture of philanthropy in educational support Student-Centredness: When we place students at the core of activity and resist the appearance of corporate culture, people feel more comfortable about giving sacrificially

31 Building Values of Compassionate Justice A school’s quest to align core business and philanthropy The CIRCLE Culture Capture Process CASE APAC March 2014 Your questions?

32 Dr Phil Cummins | |


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