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 Introduction and Goals  Class Act Website  Plan  Views  Teaching/Learning Experience  Strategies and Approaches  Panel  Wrap Up.

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Presentation on theme: " Introduction and Goals  Class Act Website  Plan  Views  Teaching/Learning Experience  Strategies and Approaches  Panel  Wrap Up."— Presentation transcript:

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2  Introduction and Goals  Class Act Website  Plan  Views  Teaching/Learning Experience  Strategies and Approaches  Panel  Wrap Up

3  Presenters  Panelists  Participants

4 NSF award Texas Sub-Award Partners What is available to you Overall goal of the grant activities

5 1. Learn about Deaf/ASL Culture 2. Understand the student’s perspective of access 3. Learn about potential pitfalls and perils while lecturing in the classroom 4. Create a personal plan for classroom strategies 5. Learn about classroom support services

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7   Its purpose is to provide techniques and strategies to enhance access to instruction for students who are deaf or hard of hearing and are in a mainstream classroom

8 Site Includes: Challenges faced by faculty members and strategies for addressing the challenges A discussion board for teachers A page of additional links to short videotapes with direct comments from students who face issues daily A page of videos of faculty with comments on their experiences

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10  Guiding Questions ◦ Which of my current teaching strategies makes access for deaf/hard of hearing students in my classes more difficult? ◦ How might I modify strategies on improving access to learning?

11  Describe the area(s) you plan to work on this year  Describe the goals for change(s)  Describe strategies to achieve the goal(s)  Describe methods/tools you will use to document and evaluate your progress

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13  Hearing loss (types)  Physiology  Deafness  Audiogram

14  Deaf Culture  ASL  Communication  Behavior  Identity-Deafhood and ASL  Contributions and Deaf Gain

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16 BIOL 1406 Spring 2013

17 ...are very large molecules found in all living organisms. There are four major classes of biomolecules, known as the carbohydrates, the lipids, the proteins and the nucleic acids. The carbohydrates include foods such as rice, wheat and corn; the lipids include butter, cholesterol and other steroids as well as the phospholipids of plasma membranes; the proteins serve many functions in organisms including hormones, enzymes, transport and contractile molecules; and the nucleic acids are the DNA in the nucleus of eukaryotes and the nucleoid region of prokaryotes, the ribonucleic acid and often the hydrogen acceptors and energy molecules such as adenosine triphosphate. These four categories of macromolecules are essential components of cells and present in the food groups that we ingest.

18 Monomers are small molecules that combine together by dehydration, the removal of water, to make the carbohydrates, lipids and proteins of cellular macromolecules. The dehydration reaction is also called a condensation reaction, a similar concept to the condensation of water that forms on the outside of glasses of iced drinks in the summer time. In a condensation reaction the hydroxide is removed from one monomer and the hydrogen from another, producing water and establishing a single covalent bond between the monomers; this continues until a large molecule is produced. The exception is that nucleic acids to not undergo a dehydration reaction.

19 A prevalent monomer of many carbohydrates is glucose, an aldohexose with the functional groups of an aldehyde carbonyl and five hydoxyls. When dry glucose is a linear molecule; in solution glucose forms a hexagonal hemiacetal. The hydroxyl of Carbon 1 of one glucose molecule is removed and the hydrogen of Carbon 4 of another glucose molecule is removed in a condensation reaction to make the acetal structure of the disaccharide. Occasionally, there is a 1  6 condensation reaction to produce a branch point along the polysaccharide.

20 In both plants and animals, carbohydrates are used as energy storage, with plants using starch as long term energy storage to fuel the growth of the seedling and animals using glycogen as short term energy storage. glycogen

21  Discuss

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23  Communication is vital to success of any endeavor  Communication takes two  People need to work together  Ask- “What can I do to make it easier for the two of us to communicate?”  Group versus one on one

24  Eye contact  Topic of discussion  Gestures, body language, facial expressions  Environment conducive to communication

25  Agenda  Visual Aids  Layout of room = good communication  Vital information  Minutes or notes for references

26 Line of vision PowerPoint Usage -pacing yourself -less is more Use a document camera Lag time referencing text

27  Ask the student  Speak with another teacher who has worked with the student or other students who are deaf or hard of hearing  Be available for consult with service providers  Work as a team

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29 1- Show all text on a document camera. 2- Have PowerPoint and lecture notes available to the students before class 3- Treat all students equally 4- Have a positive/flexible attitude

30 5- Interpreters are not always an accurate reflection of students when voicing for them 6- Be aware of “process time,” which is the time required to process information into another language. Slow down! It may be beneficial to take small pauses or a short break

31 7- While using PowerPoint slides, overheads, or other similar material, give students time to read before moving on 8- Allow Deaf students to have access to the first few rows in class on the first day

32 9- Don’t force groups of deaf/hard of hearing students to work together. Well before you establish groups, ask students privately for their preferences in group assignments 10- If you are using a laser pointer, allow the pointer to remain on the object for an extended period.

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34  ASL- American Sign Language  Sign Language Transliteration  Oral Interpreting  Cued Speech  Deaf Blind Interpreting

35  Confidentiality  Render the message faithfully  Neutrality  Mannerism appropriate to the situation  Preparation  Professionalism

36  Facilitate communication  Sight Lines  References  Turn Taking

37  Environmental Considerations ◦ Lighting ◦ Position ◦ External Noise ◦ Amplification  Importance of Student Feedback to the Interpreting Process ◦ Head Nod/Manual Feedback ◦ Facial Expression ◦ Student Participation

38  Meet with the interpreter before the first class to share outlines, texts, agenda, technical vocabulary, class syllabus, and other background information that would be pertinent  Speak naturally at a reasonable, modest pace  Use I and you  Avoid use of ‘this’ and ‘that’

39  Look directly at the person  Avoid talking while students are focused on written class work  Strategic breaks  Captioned films and videos  Testing modifications and accommodations

40  Organized thoughts  Changes in Instruction  Prep Materials  Group Presentations

41  Traditional Labs vs. Outdoor Labs  Computer Labs  Group discussions/seminars  Participation- part of grade?  Multiple students per group  Safety: student and interpreter

42  Pacing: ◦ Slow and fast paced lectures  Pausing: ◦ Micro-breaks  Physical Demands: ◦ Mind and Body

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44  What is it like to communicate in groups with hearing students?  What are some of the challenges you face when the teacher’s content and ideas are being expressed through an interpreter?

45  What are the the challenges of having deaf/hard of hearing students in the classroom?  How has having deaf/hard of hearing students in your classroom enhanced your teaching experience?

46  What are some ways that you have seen instructors make good accommodations for interpreters to equally include deaf students?  What is the interpreter role?

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48  The most common areas where a change in instructional strategy would benefit the deaf students ◦ Use of projected images ◦ Use of whiteboard or blackboard ◦ Responding to student questions ◦ Questioning by professor

49 1. Equitable Use: Design is useful for All 2. Flexible Use: Design accommodates a wide range of preferences and abilities

50  Guiding Questions ◦ Which of my current teaching strategies makes access for deaf/hard of hearing students in my classes more difficult? ◦ How might I modify strategies on improving access to learning?

51  Describe the area(s) you plan to work on this year  Describe the goals for change(s)  Describe strategies to achieve the goal(s)  Describe methods/tools you will use to document and evaluate your progress

52  Questions?  Evaluation sheet  Thanks!

53  Paul Bernella ◦  Caroline Koo ◦  Alice Sessions ◦  Erika Shadburne ◦


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