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Presentation on theme: "Andrew Wright, Ph.D. Assistant Professor of CIS louisville.edu/faculty/alwrig01 Presentation may be found at:"— Presentation transcript:

1 Andrew Wright, Ph.D. Assistant Professor of CIS louisville.edu/faculty/alwrig01 Presentation may be found at: Using the Latest Instructional Tools for Teaching

2 Alternate Title Tegrity, Twitter and SafeAssign! Oh my!

3 Objectives Using the Latest Instructional Tools for Teaching 3 Participants will: be introduced to the use of Twitter in education be introduced to the use of 4 Blackboard tools: SafeAssign, Tegrity, blogs, and wikis learn how to create and deploy a SafeAssignment compare supplemental uses of the basic Tegrity recording compare/contrast blogs (as reflective tools to encourage metacognition) and wikis (as useful tools in group writing projects) and discuss ways to use both tools for assignments As we go through the presentation, I will ask those of you who have used each tool to identify yourselves so that your colleagues may seek you out for assistance and support after today's session During our session, I’ll ask you to be thinking about how you might want to use each technique in your teaching. At the end of the session, I will ask you to share your thoughts with the group via Twitter.

4 What is Twitter? Using the Latest Instructional Tools for Teaching 4 Twitter is a microblogging site – each post (or tweet) is a maximum of 140 characters Part blog, part social networking site, part cell phone/IM tool “After creating an account, you can personalize your profile page and enter tweets into a text field. Unless your tweets are protected, they appear on a “public timeline” page, which displays all public tweets in reverse chronological order, like a series of “micro-blogs.” Each tweet identifies the Twitterer, whose screen name links to that person’s profile page, showing all of her previous tweets and her friends’ tweets.” for

5 How might I use Twitter for class? Using the Latest Instructional Tools for Teaching 5 As with Facebook, might want to have separate account to follow your students’ tweets Almost every Twitter command can be done with nothing more than a cell phone that supports SMS Smartphones have choice of several Twitter apps or mobile website Learn the Twitter creates a link to that user in your post, called a mention Retweet: to copy someone else's post in a new update #hashtag: helps to organize your tweets into categories for easier searching Direct message: a private message to user that follows you Getting started with TwitterGetting started with Twitter (video)

6 How might I use Twitter for class? Using the Latest Instructional Tools for Teaching 6 UT-Dallas, The Twitter Experiment – use in large lectures to engage more students in discussion

7 How might I use Twitter for class? Using the Latest Instructional Tools for Teaching 7 Have students tweet about things that they find related to class topics News items, blog posts, etc. Suggest #hashtags to organize #InfoSec, #Database, etc. Maybe give extra credit/participation points for sharing Can help create a learning community Have students reply to a specific prompt you provide in class Can show responses in real-time Use a specifically created #hashtag so that you can search, even if student isn’t following you Have students follow leaders in Tweet about your experiences while at a conference Some conferences have setup #tags, such as #EDUCAUSE10

8 How might I use Twitter for class? Using the Latest Instructional Tools for Teaching 8 David Green summarizes his use of Twitter: “I typically send a discussion ‘tweet’ each week, read and summarize students' responses, and begin the following class with a thirty-minute group discussion in which I incorporate the students' responses (Table 2).” – A Dialogue for Engagement

9 Should I have privacy concerns? Using the Latest Instructional Tools for Teaching 9 Privacy should be a real concern for users of social networking sites Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg – “People have really gotten comfortable not only sharing more information and different kinds, but more openly and with more people. That social norm is just something that has evolved over time.” We talk about privacy extensively in our first course for CIS majors Learn the privacy settings yourself and lead by example FERPA raises many questions “Should graded or optional work be posted on public sites? May peers post feedback on other students’ work? Is it acceptable to leave any kind of evaluative comments on public sites containing student work? Should access to student work be limited to those in the course? The answers to these questions may vary by institution, but FERPA places the burden of ensuring the privacy of the education record on the institution.” 7 Things You Should Know About Privacy in Web 2.0 Learning Environments, EDUCAUSE Learning Initiative.

10 Your turn! Using the Latest Instructional Tools for Teaching 10 Who already uses Twitter? Follow only? Active tweeter? Use with classes? How do you think you might use Twitter with your classes? Tweeters: and include #SPHISws and we’ll be able to find your

11 Maybe I should stick to Blackboard? Using the Latest Instructional Tools for Teaching 11 Blackboard would seem the best spot for primary course content and assessment activities Clear boundaries between professional and personal Fewer issues with privacy concerns Blackboard does offer some tools for the Web 2.0-curious instructor within its walls, including blogs and wikis that we’ll discuss later

12 Maybe I should stick to Blackboard? Using the Latest Instructional Tools for Teaching 12 New version of Blackboard makes it easier to incorporate YouTube, Flickr, and SlideShare content into your course Find under Build Content, Mashups Can embed video directly in content area as below

13 Preventing plagiarism with SafeAssign 13

14 What is SafeAssign? 14 SafeAssign™ is a plagiarism prevention service, offered by Blackboard to its enterprise clients. This service helps educators prevent plagiarism by detecting unoriginal content in student papers. In addition to acting as a plagiarism deterrent, it also has features designed to aid in educating students about plagiarism and importance of proper attribution of any borrowed content. Using the Latest Instructional Tools for Teaching

15 Plagiarism statistics Using the Latest Instructional Tools for Teaching 15 From plagiarism.org:plagiarism.org In U.S. News and World Report surveys 80% of "high-achieving" high school students admit to cheating 75% of college students admitted cheating, and 90% of college students didn't believe cheaters would be caught Almost 85% of college students said cheating was necessary to get ahead In a sample of 1,800 students at nine state universities: 84% admitted to cheating on written assignments 52% had copied a few sentences from a website without citing the source

16 What took UofL so long to authorize use of plagiarism prevention tools? Using the Latest Instructional Tools for Teaching 16 General Legal Issues FERPA Copyright Philosophy of Teaching Issues Teachable moment vs. “Gotcha” Respect

17 Catalog statement Using the Latest Instructional Tools for Teaching 17 From current Undergraduate Catalog: “Plagiarism Prevention: Instructors may use a range of strategies (including plagiarism-prevention software at the university) to compare student works with private and public information resources in order to identify possible plagiarism and academic dishonesty. Comparisons of student works may require submitting a copy of the original work to the plagiarism-prevention service. The service may retain that copy in some circumstances. Academic units or programs may establish a more rigorous standard of review or consent, which will be noted in the relevant guidelines.”Undergraduate Catalog

18 What does SafeAssign check? Using the Latest Instructional Tools for Teaching 18 SafeAssign compares submitted papers to: Internet Index of billions of documents available to public ProQuest ABI/Inform database Millions of current articles, updated weekly, many with full-text Institutional Database Papers submitted by users from UofL Global Reference Database Papers that were volunteered by students at other institutions

19 Sample SafeAssign report Using the Latest Instructional Tools for Teaching 19 From: safeassign.comsafeassign.com

20 Sample SafeAssign report Using the Latest Instructional Tools for Teaching 20 From: safeassign.comsafeassign.com

21 SafeAssign is not enough Using the Latest Instructional Tools for Teaching 21 SafeAssign cannot replace faculty judgment SA report does not prove that a student plagiarized work SA won’t detect all forms of plagiarism But SafeAssign can be used for creating teaching opportunities

22 Plagiarism as a form of academic dishonesty Using the Latest Instructional Tools for Teaching 22 Acts of academic dishonesty include: Plagiarism: "representing the words or ideas of someone else as one's own" Cheating: getting credit by deceptive means Fabrication: making up information Falsification: altering information/records Multiple Submission: using the same work to receive multiple instance of credit Complicity in any of the forms of academic dishonesty above Undergraduate Catalog

23 Intentional vs unintentional plagiarism IntentionalUnintentional Consumerism Copy-Pasting Potluck paper Labor of laziness Forgotten footnote Misinforming Ghost writing Self-stealing Perfect crime Mixing up notes & sources Facts vs. source to cite Incorrect citation Incorrect style Improper paraphrasing Cultural background Professional differences Misunderstood expectation 23 Using the Latest Instructional Tools for Teaching

24 Your turn! 24 Discuss and share how you would deal with the following cases of (possible) plagiarism: 1. A student continues to use ideas from a source after proper citations 2. A student turns in a recycled paper written for another class (with minor changes) 3. A student has rephrased words from a source such that SafeAssign doesn’t show lengthy blocks of matched text 4. A student has used lecture notes without citing source Using the Latest Instructional Tools for Teaching

25 Preventing plagiarism through pedagogy Syllabus Teaching: process-based view of writing Teaching: research skills 25 Using the Latest Instructional Tools for Teaching

26 Syllabus Using the Latest Instructional Tools for Teaching 26 Communicate your expectations about intellectual honesty and rigor Highlight intrinsic motivation (the desire to learn research skills), besides giving the regular warning against plagiarism If you intend to use SafeAssign in your course, you must: Include university language about plagiarism prevention from Undergraduate Catalog (see earlier slide) Undergraduate Catalog State how you intend to use SafeAssign, specifying whether you will accept alternative submission

27 Process-based view of writing Using the Latest Instructional Tools for Teaching 27 Conducting preliminary research/reading Selecting a topic Preparing a working bibliography Drafting research questions Developing a working thesis (or hypothesis) Creating an outline Writing the first draft Revising, editing, and proofreading Producing the final draft Writing a reflection of the process

28 Supporting students with new research skills Using the Latest Instructional Tools for Teaching 28 If you are demanding more complex research skills than students already have, Either teach those new skills, or Encourage students to use available resources: The librarylibrary Research librarians The University Writing CenterUniversity Writing Center Tools that the University makes available Databases accessible through the library

29 Using SafeAssign 29

30 Modes of use 30 SafeAssign may be used in two primary ways Creating SafeAssignments Like a regular Assignment in Blackboard that routes student submissions through plagiarism service In normal mode, papers added to Institutional Database automatically with student opt-in for Global Reference Database In draft mode, performs text matching but paper isn’t retained in any database Direct Submit Faculty may directly upload papers May add to Institutional Database but not to Global Reference Database Using the Latest Instructional Tools for Teaching

31 Supported document types Using the Latest Instructional Tools for Teaching 31 SafeAssign supports several types of document.doc(x)Word odtOpenOffice.pdfAdobe PDF.rtfRich Text Format.txtPlain Text.htm(l)Web Page

32 Demonstration Using the Latest Instructional Tools for Teaching 32 Easier to show in BlackboardBlackboard Any instructor may use Direct Submit to test with sample papers from any course If you want to see student view, use Course Tools, Add Test Student to create/add your own student account to course You may then see and complete SafeAssignments See

33 Creating a SafeAssignment Using the Latest Instructional Tools for Teaching 33 From a content area (such as Assignments), choose Create Assessment menu then SafeAssignment Fields: Name Points Possible Instructions Make the assessment available Track Number of Views Availability Dates Draft Urgent Checking Student Viewable

34 Using Direct Submit Instructors may use Direct Submit to directly upload papers Two modes Shared Shared folders are accessible to anyone that can access Direct Submit for a course (other instructors and teaching assistants, for example) Private Private folders are only accessible by the instructor and may be accessed from any course in Blackboard in which you are designated as an instructor 34 Using the Latest Instructional Tools for Teaching

35 Instructors view of SafeAssignments Using the Latest Instructional Tools for Teaching 35 Instructors may view SafeAssignment matching reports in two ways From SafeAssign under Control Panel, Course Tools – this is the only way to access Direct Submit From Grade Center under Control Panel

36 Using Matching Report Paper Information Matching Scores Sentence matching scores are the percentage probability that two sentences have the same meaning. This number can also be interpreted as the reciprocal to the probability that these two sentences are similar by chance. Overall score is an indicator of what percentage of the submitted paper matches existing sources. This score is a warning indicator only and papers should be reviewed to see if the matches are properly attributed. Scores below 15 percent: These papers typical include some quotes and few common phrases or blocks of text that match other documents. These papers typically do not require further analysis, as there is no evidence of the possibility of plagiarism in these papers. Scores between 15 percent and 40 percent: These papers include extensive quoted or paraphrased material or they may include plagiarism. These papers should be reviewed to determine if the matching content is properly attributed. Scores over 40 percent: There is a very high probability that text in this paper was copied from other sources. These papers include quoted or paraphrased text in excess and should be reviewed for plagiarism. 36 Using the Latest Instructional Tools for Teaching From: safeassign.comsafeassign.com

37 Using Matching Report Suspected Sources 37 Using the Latest Instructional Tools for Teaching

38 Using Matching Report Paper Text 38 Using the Latest Instructional Tools for Teaching

39 Using Matching Report Paper Text 39 Using the Latest Instructional Tools for Teaching

40 Your turn! Who uses SafeAssign already? What pedagogical strategies for preventing plagiarism do you use in your own classes? How you might incorporate SafeAssign into your classes? Tweeters: and include #SPHISws and we’ll be able to find your 40 Using the Latest Instructional Tools for Teaching

41 Using Tegrity to capture classes and create supplements 41

42 What is Tegrity? 42 Tegrity is UofL’s class capture tool, though recordings can be made just about anywhere In summer 2008, ATC recommended Tegrity and IT agreed to fund Soft rollout in Fall 2008 with wider adoption beginning Spring 2009 Summer 2009, UofL wins Rapid Response Award at Tegrity Users Conference Spring 2010, UofL hosts the Tegrity Users Conference and Gale Rhodes receives the President’s Award Using the Latest Instructional Tools for Teaching

43 Why class capture? 43 Teachers speak an average of 120 words per minute Students write an average of 20 words per minute Students must decide whether to write or listen Time elapsed Amount retained Using the Latest Instructional Tools for Teaching

44 Why Tegrity? 44 Tablet PC for Annotations Voice Recorder Only Instructor Video Demonstrations Easy capture – no change in teaching methods required to use Capture, Store, Index with click of a button Three buttons: Start, Pause, Stop OPTIONS Using the Latest Instructional Tools for Teaching

45 Review anywhere, anytime 45 Enhanced Audio or Video Podcast Mobile Access PC Browser Mac Browser Using the Latest Instructional Tools for Teaching

46 Example 46 Using the Latest Instructional Tools for Teaching

47 Tegrity usage at UofL 47 Using the Latest Instructional Tools for Teaching

48 Class attendance 48 If I record all of my class sessions, won’t students stop coming to class? It all depends on what you do in the classroom! Our experience with Tegrity suggests that how you conduct your class makes all the difference If your teaching style is more passive and lecture-based Students might find reviewing a class recording equally as informative as attending class If your teaching style is more interactive Students will probably find that class recordings are not equivalent to the in-class experience Using the Latest Instructional Tools for Teaching

49 Student impact 49 See TUC 2010 Student Panel in iTunes U louisville.edu louisville.edu Michelle – "Before Tegrity was used in classrooms, I was too busy taking notes to actually listen to and understand the professor’s lecture. Now, knowing that I can rely on Tegrity outside of the classroom, I am much more engaged in the lecture in the classroom and I don’t bother taking notes. After each class, I review the lecture in Tegrity and take any notes that are necessary. Before Tegrity, taking classes was more just an exercise in getting the A. Now, I can actually understand the material and be engaged in the classroom, and get the A. Tegrity allows me to be a much more effective student." Michelle Using the Latest Instructional Tools for Teaching

50 Student impact 50 Jeanne - “Tegrity is an amazing educational tool. I wish all my professors were required to use Tegrity. Tegrity is what made the difference between facing a failing grade, and turning that grade into a B. A few weeks after the start of the semester, my son suddenly became ill, and spent over a week in the [hospital]. I hadn’t left his side for three days, nor would I while steady streams of specialists were visiting him. After he was stabilized… I started to think about the world outside of the hospital. Among those thoughts was the sudden realization that I was horribly behind in my computer programming class, and the withdrawal deadline had past. Using the Latest Instructional Tools for Teaching

51 Student impact 51 Jeanne - “After a brief moment of panic, I called and had my books and laptop brought to the hospital. For the next few days, I would put in my ear buds and play the Tegrity sessions, while my son slept in his hospital bed. Even after my son was out of the hospital, sometimes my mind was not entirely focused on class lectures. Tegrity is invaluable for clarifying lecture notes. One of my favorite features is the ability to add my own bookmarks and comments while the session is playing. This allows me to review selected portions before completing an assignment or while studying for a test. With hard work and determination, I was able to successfully complete the semester, but I could not have accomplished that without Tegrity.” Using the Latest Instructional Tools for Teaching

52 Tegrity Bookmarks 52 Students can add comments or mark sections that are important or unclear Can also send link directly to these locations Using the Latest Instructional Tools for Teaching

53 Tegrity Connect 53 Real-time chat from within Tegrity Using the Latest Instructional Tools for Teaching

54 Tegrity iPhone App 54 Using the Latest Instructional Tools for Teaching

55 Tegrity settings put you in charge 55 Using the Latest Instructional Tools for Teaching

56 Classroom-based pedagogies Promoting cognitive elaboration Enhancing critical thinking Providing feedback 56 Using the Latest Instructional Tools for Teaching

57 Classroom-based pedagogies Promoting cognitive elaboration Modeling think-aloud-problem solving “You, the expert have to think out loud as you write up solutions to problems; with Tegrity this process becomes less onerous for the instructor and far more effective for the learner.” - Dr. Pavel Zahorik, UofL Department of Psychological and Brain Science 57 Using the Latest Instructional Tools for Teaching

58 Classroom-based pedagogies Enhancing critical thinking Capturing a case-study discussion AcousticMagic array microphones in CoB classrooms 58 Using the Latest Instructional Tools for Teaching

59 Classroom-based pedagogies Providing feedback Group presentations recorded and available for later critique Feedback on accuracy of note taking 59 Using the Latest Instructional Tools for Teaching

60 Tegrity techniques - beyond class capture 60 Full class capture Supplemental recordings Problem sets/solutions How-to demos Guest speakers Use of tablet, SmartBoard, Sympodium for annotation and equations, diagrams Audio only – MP3 and WMA input Incorporation of document camera sources, microscope output, webcam video Student recordings Grading sessions Record to private course and send student the link to recording Tegrity Connect – live chat Examples online at: presentations/tegrity-examples.htmlhttp://louisville.edu/faculty/alwrig01/ presentations/tegrity-examples.html Using the Latest Instructional Tools for Teaching

61 Using Tegrity 61

62 Instructor platforms Using the Latest Instructional Tools for Teaching 62 At a minimum, Tegrity requires only a computer and microphone for the instructor and access to the server via network (before and after recording). Additional multimedia hardware can be connected and captured if desired. PC operating systems 32-bit: Windows XP SP2 or SP3, Windows Vista, Windows 7 64-bit: Windows 7 PC browsers32-bit OS: Internet Explorer (IE) 6, 7, 8, FireFox (FF) 3, 3.5, 3.6 Mac operating systems 32-bit: Mac OSX 10.5, bit: Mac OSX 10.6 Mac browsersSafari 3, 4, 5 FireFox 3, 3.5, 3.6 Minimum RAM1 GB Recommended RAM2 GB or more Minimum CPUPentium 4, 1.3 GHz Recommended CPUIntel Core Duo or better

63 Initial installation Using the Latest Instructional Tools for Teaching 63 PC Recommend doing initial install from Internet Explorer Need to have a local administrator account (only for install) Mac Recommend doing initial install from Safari Need to have a local administrator account (only for install) First time click Record a Class from Tegrity web application, will install necessary software If using shared computer in classroom, may need to work with your Tier I support or IT to get client for recording installed first time Will work with any microphone that computer recognizes

64 Recording Modes Using the Latest Instructional Tools for Teaching 64 Two recording modes: Standard Recording mode: Lowest resource usage (CPU and disk) recording. Records with PowerPoint with a dedicated OLE solution, annotations with a dedicated engine and screen recording and video. Will not capture overlays such as iClicker. Enhanced Recording mode: Captures entire recording as a screen recording. Enables instructor video throughout the recording. Works with overlays such a iClicker and embedded PowerPoint video/animation.

65 Recordings Using the Latest Instructional Tools for Teaching 65 Files are stored on local machine during recording Do not need Internet connection while recording (after start) During and after recording finishes, files are processed on local machine Smart processing, will pause itself if you do something CPU intensive May pause/unpause processing manually, if need to After processing finished, files are automatically uploaded to Tegrity servers The upload process needs Internet connection Recording files remain on local machine until you delete them, even after upload complete!

66 Demonstration Using the Latest Instructional Tools for Teaching 66 Easier to show in BlackboardBlackboard Every instructor in Blackboard also receives a private course in Tegrity that is only accessible to them Find under FirstName LastName Private Course This is a safe place to practice with Tegrity See https://help.tegrity.com/help-for-instructors.htmlhttps://help.tegrity.com/help-for-instructors.html

67 Recording a class Using the Latest Instructional Tools for Teaching 67 Start from Blackboard and enter your course From the left navigation menu, click on Tegrity Classes This will open the Tegrity web application in a pop-up window. You won’t need to log into Tegrity. You’ll be in the same course as from Blackboard.

68 Recording a class Using the Latest Instructional Tools for Teaching 68 Check your Course Settings from Actions menu From Actions menu, can also control individual recordings Rename Edit Publish (also removes from student view) Get Class Link – get a URL that can be shared

69 Recording a class Using the Latest Instructional Tools for Teaching 69 From Course Settings can control options for this course Enhanced mode Automatic publication Delivery options Download MP3 Pod/Vod-casts

70 Recording a class Using the Latest Instructional Tools for Teaching 70 Click on Record a Class and Tegrity Recorder client will start on your computer

71 Recording a class Using the Latest Instructional Tools for Teaching 71 Click on Record a Class and Tegrity Recorder client will start on your computer Will default to same course but can change Give recording a title Check audio levels Click on Record a Class button

72 Recording a class Using the Latest Instructional Tools for Teaching 72 Will remind you that recording is starting and preview the toolbar icons (in red box here) Click the OK button to start recording screen Once the toolbar appears in your System Tray, recording is active Look for activity in the Volume indicator

73 Recording a class Using the Latest Instructional Tools for Teaching 73 Click on the left arrow to expand the toolbar From expanded toolbar, you can annotate on top of screen, open a full-screen whiteboard, and bring your webcam into view Remember, can pause recording at any time by clicking on Pause button in toolbar

74 Recording a class Using the Latest Instructional Tools for Teaching 74 When finished with recording, click on Stop button in toolbar Will display confirmation window Yes – end recording No – return to recording Upload – default option Preview – after processing, can review locally before uploading Delete

75 Your turn! Using the Latest Instructional Tools for Teaching 75 How might you incorporate Tegrity into your classes? Tweeters: and include #SPHISws and we’ll be able to find your

76 Using blogs and wikis in courses 76

77 What is a blog? DailyBlogTips.com offers: DailyBlogTips.com “A blog is basically a type of website, like a forum or a social bookmarking site. As such it is defined by the technical aspects and features around it, and not by the content published inside it. The features that make blogs different from other websites are: content is published in a chronological fashion content is updated regularly readers have the possibility to leave comments other blog authors can interact via trackbacks and pingbacks content is syndicated via RSS feeds” 77 Using the Latest Instructional Tools for Teaching

78 How blogs are used Blogs in Blackboard are often used for personal reflection (private journals) and community discussions May set up in any content area May also set up a course level blog used by instructor to communicate with class Think Announcements with student comments For more examples, see BlogsForLearningBlogsForLearning Reflective writing exercises in a blog are an excellent way to engage students in metacognition In simple terms, metacognition is thinking about thinking, knowing what we know and what we don’t know Studies indicate that increases in learning follow from direct instruction in metacognitive strategies 78 Using the Latest Instructional Tools for Teaching

79 On metacognition Using the Latest Instructional Tools for Teaching 79 “When students have knowledge and control of their own cognitive processes, learning is enhanced; this assertion holds regardless of the domain of learning, whether reading, writing, science, mathematics, or any other activity that involves thinking.” – Linda Baker Strategies for developing metacognitive behaviors Ask students to identify “what you know” and “what you don't know” at the start. Ask to students to keep a “thinking journal” in which students reflect upon their thinking and how they have dealt with difficulties throughout the process. Ask students to debrief the thinking process with closure activities that focus on thinking processes to develop strategies that can be applied to other learning situations. - Elaine Blakely and Sheila Spence

80 What is a wiki? The Wikipedia article on Wikis suggests: “Ward Cunningham, and co-author Bo Leuf, in their book The Wiki Way: Quick Collaboration on the Web described the essence of the Wiki concept as follows:Wikipedia article on Wikis A wiki invites all users to edit any page or to create new pages within the wiki Web site, using only a plain-vanilla Web browser without any extra add-ons. Wiki promotes meaningful topic associations between different pages by making page link creation almost intuitively easy and showing whether an intended target page exists or not. A wiki is not a carefully-crafted site for casual visitors. Instead, it seeks to involve the visitor in an ongoing process of creation and collaboration that constantly changes the Web site landscape.” 80 Using the Latest Instructional Tools for Teaching

81 How wikis are used Wikis in Blackboard are often used with team projects Members of the team collaborate to produce online site Also empowers the instructor with assessment details such as student submissions and percentage of participation within the group For more examples, see The Power of Wikis in Higher EdThe Power of Wikis in Higher Ed 81 Using the Latest Instructional Tools for Teaching

82 Deploying blogs and wikis in Blackboard 82 Using the Latest Instructional Tools for Teaching

83 Blogs and wikis at UofL Using the Latest Instructional Tools for Teaching 83 Blackboard does offer some tools for the Web 2.0-curious instructor within its walls Currently, UofL is using a third-party tool (Learning Objects’ Campus Pack) to provide blogs and wikisCampus Pack New version of Blackboard has built-in support but (as I understand it), we are sticking with current tools until contract is up Delphi offers Getting Started guides for using blogs and wikisGetting Started guides See Campus Pack’s Quick Start Guides and User GuideQuick Start GuidesUser Guide

84 Demonstration Using the Latest Instructional Tools for Teaching 84 Easier to show in BlackboardBlackboard If you want to practice, deploy to a content area that is not visible to students (or visible only to your student test account using Adaptive Release)

85 Adding a blog or wiki Using the Latest Instructional Tools for Teaching 85 Currently, Delphi is having problems with deploying Campus Pack tools from Blackboard Group Sets For the moment, should only deploy directly from a content area In your desired content area, choose Add Interactive Tool menu Select Blog, Journal,or Wiki

86 Adding a blog or wiki Using the Latest Instructional Tools for Teaching 86 Next, choose to Create New or Add Link

87 Adding a blog or wiki Using the Latest Instructional Tools for Teaching 87 Provide a Title and Description Currently, edits to Title aren’t reflected back in BB content area Choose Grade Book Entry Will add column to GradeCenter

88 Adding a blog or wiki Using the Latest Instructional Tools for Teaching 88 From here, can change settings Need to establish Permissions Control who can see and edit the content

89 Adding a blog or wiki Using the Latest Instructional Tools for Teaching 89 Establish Permissions Viewers – Who can see content Authors – Who can add, edit, and delete content Owners – can’t change this Instructors always own

90 Assessing a blog or wiki Using the Latest Instructional Tools for Teaching 90 The Assessment tool built into Campus Pack provides transparency into assignments Instructors can see student contributions to blogs and wikis, as well as gain a better understanding of student progress Click the Assessment link in a site for item statistics

91 Assessing a blog or wiki Using the Latest Instructional Tools for Teaching 91 Instructors can click on a student and Evaluate Participants individually

92 Your turn! What are some ways you might use blogs and wikis in your courses? Tweeters: and include #SPHISws and we’ll be able to find your 92 Using the Latest Instructional Tools for Teaching

93 Questions and final thoughts What else? Tweeters: and include #SPHISws and we’ll be able to find your 93 Using the Latest Instructional Tools for Teaching

94 Delphi Technology Training Using the Latest Instructional Tools for Teaching 94 Teaching with Technology Preventing Plagiarism with SafeAssign (complete session) Preventing Plagiarism with SafeAssign Capturing Your Course with Tegrity (complete session) Capturing Your Course with Tegrity Enhancing Collaboration through Blogs and Wikis (complete session) Enhancing Collaboration through Blogs and Wikis Blackboard Training (several different sessions) Blackboard Training

95 Acknowledgements This presentation would not have been possible without the help of our colleagues from the Delphi Center for Teaching and Learning: Edna Ross Mark Kasselhut Mike Homan Shyam Sharma Marie Kendall Brown 95 Using the Latest Instructional Tools for Teaching

96 References and Resources (not already linked) Using the Latest Instructional Tools for Teaching 96 7 Things You Should Know About Assessing Online Team-Based Learning, EDUCAUSE Learning Initiative. 7 Things You Should Know About Assessing Online Team-Based Learning 7 Things You Should Know About Privacy in Web 2.0 Learning Environments, EDUCAUSE Learning Initiative. 7 Things You Should Know About Privacy in Web 2.0 Learning Environments 7 Things You Should Know About Lecture Capture, EDUCAUSE Learning Initiative. 7 Things You Should Know About Lecture Capture 7 Things You Should Know About Blogs, EDUCAUSE Learning Initiative. 7 Things You Should Know About Blogs 7 Things You Should Know About Wikis, EDUCAUSE Learning Initiative. 7 Things You Should Know About Wikis Brown, Malcolm, et al. A Dialogue for Engagement. EDUCAUSE Review, vol. 45, no. 5 (September/October 2010).A Dialogue for Engagement

97 References and Resources (not already linked) Using the Latest Instructional Tools for Teaching 97 Cutler, Lindsay. Nine Essentials of Twitter Etiquette.Nine Essentials of Twitter Etiquette Hodges, Charles. If You Twitter, Will They Come?. EDUCAUSE Quarterly, vol. 33, no. 2 (2010).If You Twitter, Will They Come? Sample, Mark. A Framework for Teaching with Twitter. ProfHacker (August 16, 2010).A Framework for Teaching with Twitter Schaffhauser, Dian. The Super-Secret, Never-Before-Revealed Guide to Web 2.0 in the Classroom. Campus Technology, vol. 44, no. 2 (October 2010).The Super-Secret, Never-Before-Revealed Guide to Web 2.0 in the Classroom Walsh, K. 100 Ways to Teach with Twitter, EmergingEdTech.100 Ways to Teach with Twitter


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