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Basics of Behaviour Management Kay Morris & Helen Harris.

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Presentation on theme: "Basics of Behaviour Management Kay Morris & Helen Harris."— Presentation transcript:

1 Basics of Behaviour Management Kay Morris & Helen Harris

2 Behaviour Management  Aim – To establish a classroom environment that minimises the risk of behavioural issues

3 Outcomes for the session. 1.Engage with a range of reasons why disruptive behaviour may occur 2.Reflect on own classroom management 3.Identify the principles of classroom management 4.Consider strategies for re-engaging the learners

4 Resources  Coloured card  Expression faces  Late sheet  Mini whiteboards

5 Present situation Behaviour and Consequences  What are the problems you are facing with behaviour?  What are the consequences of these problems at present?..Be ready to share one of these

6 Activity Paired/ Group discussion

7 Activity Questionnaire (What is your classroom management profile?)

8 The Personality Whoareyou?

9 MILES & The Coke Bottle Stages

10 Teacher to Identity  What does my presence, my voice, my personality do to help me/restrict me in my work?  Voice...  Presence...  Personality  Teaching style

11 “Disruptive and Indifferent students are simply potential learners with a few blocks in the way. It is my job to help the person remove the blocks for themselves and realise their potential to learn”

12 Activity What do students do to undermine a well managed classroom?

13 What do students do to undermine a well managed classroom?  Turn up late  Talk when I am talking  Answer mobile phones  Turn up without materials  Turn up without having done the homework  Argue with each other  Fight with each other  Give me “dirty looks”  Swear  Argue back when reprimanded  Eat and drink  Keep leaving the room for “toilet” (cigarette breaks)  Do no work in the lesson  Distract others from doing any work

14 What might I do to undermine a well managed classroom ?

15  Raise my voice  Slam the door in a temper  Ensure I have the last word  Mimic the students  Use humiliation  Plead  Make comparisons  Use sarcasm  Use physical force  Draw others into the conflict  Hold a grudge  Have double standards  Act superior “I’m the boss”  Arrive at the same time as the students

16 What am I currently doing to encourage positive behaviour and learning? Laptop / powerpoint activity – Each person to create a slide on current practice Activity - Sharing Good Practice

17 Use following slides as handouts and group discussion for team planning

18 What do I need to create a well managed classroom?  Ground Rules  Procedures  Rewards  Consequences  An effective Classroom Layout  Management Support  Parental support

19 Ground Rules  Ground Rules are in place to establish your expectations of student conduct clearly  Develop, discuss and display rules as a team –include student reps  Keep the number of rules to a minimum (4-6)  Follow through consistently. Challenge all behaviour that breaks the ground rules

20 A set of ground rules (example) 1. Follow instructions the first time they are given 2. Treat all students and staff with respect 3. Bring all necessary materials to class including your ID card 4. Arrive promptly to each lesson 5. Turn off your mobile phone before you enter the classroom 6. No eating. Be careful with drinks and make sure they are well away from the computers

21 Procedures ( Your procedures are the methods for how you want things to be done in your classroom to practise and establish your ground rules) Some examples:  A procedure for starting the lesson. Bags on floor, phones off, paper and pens on desk etc., objectives on board. Ensure all eyes are on you. Crisp start  A procedure for lateness. Establish a late book. Late arrivals to sign, date, and time and reason for lateness. You avoid getting into discussions which break up your start and can review the book at your convenience to see if patterns are developing

22 Rewards (Positive reinforcement for those who co-operate with the ground rules is the greatest tool for managing student behaviour)  Use praise, recognition, and students’ names often  Establish a team reward system (note to personal tutor, certificate, Student Awards, student of the term: gift voucher, sweets for quizzes. Make reward chart visible for younger groups.  Take a student to the School Leader for praise/share achievement  Take students on trips/visits  What are rewards in your area? Can you establish one now?

23 Consequences (These also need to be firmly in place and result from a student breaking the agreed ground rules)  Not allowed to attend trips/visits  Writing assignment that is late in lesson whilst others do activity  Late book brought to parents eve  Note to personal tutor –use the system (stage 1-3)  Time out  What other consequences do you use? Can you add any now?

24 Hints and tips Consider this………….  Greeting learners at the door.  Complete the late book.  Fill in from the back of the class.  Consider learner feelings: Pace of the lesson/ Traffic lights.  How are you feeling? Flipchart.  “Be here now” - The Learners are here because they see that they can get some benefit out of the session.

25 Teaching and Learning Resources  Help Help

26 Recap Outcomes. - engage with a range of reasons why disruptive behaviour may occur - identify the principles of classroom management - reflect on own classroom management profile - consider strategies for re-engaging the disruptive student

27 Extra Resources

28 8 principles to effective classroom management  Be DEFINITE: “I know what I want”  Be AWARE: “I know what will happen if I don’t get what I want”  Be CALM and CONSISTENT: “I’m always polite and fair to you”  Give them STRUCTURE: “I know where we are going”  Be POSITIVE: “You’re doing great”  Be INTERESTED: “You’re people as well as students”  Be FLEXIBLE: "I know when to bend rather than break”  Be Consistent : “I refuse to give up” (Sue Cowley 2003)

29 Be DEFINITE: Ground Rules  Ground Rules are in place to establish your expectations of student conduct clearly  Develop, discuss and display rules as a team –include student reps  Keep the number of rules to a minimum(4-6) and write them positively  Follow through consistently. Challenge all behaviour that breaks the ground rules

30 Rewards (Positive reinforcement for those who co-operate with the ground rules is the greatest tool for managing student behaviour)  Use praise, recognition, and students’ names often.  Establish a team reward system that means something to the learners in your room  Make the environment more social, less school like so that it becomes a reward in itself

31 Be CALM and CONSISTENT  Use your procedures and rituals to show the students you will always treat them fairly  Always be polite and reward desirable classroom behaviour O.K. can we all look this way, thanks ….Joe, Sav Morning Suki, thanks for getting in on time, much appreciated

32 Be POSITIVE:  Have high expectations  Avoid sarcasm  Give choices rather than orders  Use praise to encourage but don’t overdo it!  Find out as much about each learner as you can  Involve your students in creating a positive learning environment  Use rewards and targets that are meaningful to the learners  Set up learner groups to discuss issues

33 Final thoughts………  What could you do to change the environment and the atmosphere in your classroom?  What rewards would work for your learners?


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