Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Strategies for Differentiated Instruction Michael Klein MISD Science Consultant Michael Klein MISD Science Consultant New Teacher Academy March 28, 2011.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Strategies for Differentiated Instruction Michael Klein MISD Science Consultant Michael Klein MISD Science Consultant New Teacher Academy March 28, 2011."— Presentation transcript:

1 Strategies for Differentiated Instruction Michael Klein MISD Science Consultant Michael Klein MISD Science Consultant New Teacher Academy March 28, 2011 New Teacher Academy March 28, 2011

2 Goals for this Time What is Differentiated Instruction What strategies are available Where might I begin looking for resources Keep everyone calm and rational… What is Differentiated Instruction What strategies are available Where might I begin looking for resources Keep everyone calm and rational…

3 What kind of students do you have?

4 Misunderstood Minds Difficulties with textDifficulties with text (video) Difficulties with mathematicsDifficulties with mathematics (video) Difficulties with textDifficulties with text (video) Difficulties with mathematicsDifficulties with mathematics (video)

5 Responsibility for Learning “We are all responsible for our own learning. The teacher’s responsibility is to create educational environments that permit students to assume the responsibility that is rightfully and naturally theirs.” Brooks and Brooks (1993) “We are all responsible for our own learning. The teacher’s responsibility is to create educational environments that permit students to assume the responsibility that is rightfully and naturally theirs.” Brooks and Brooks (1993)

6 Discussion Question What are you already doing to differentiate instruction in your classroom?

7 Who deserves modifications and accommodations? Very few Everybody Very few Everybody

8 Three Major Ways to Differentiate Content Activity / Process Product Content Activity / Process Product

9 Time Jacob is a diligent, hard worker whose grades matter very much to him. He stays focused and on-task, but many times he cannot finish the work in the time allotted. He understands the material well, but when graded on work completed in a specific time period it will appear he has not mastered the standard. What adaptation can an effective teacher use to ensure that Jacob’s grades reflect that he has met the standard?

10 Participation It’s hard for Hector to concentrate when the teacher is giving direct instruction in front of the room. He needs to be doing something active to stay focused. During a lesson on map reading, what adaptation could an effective teacher use to ensure that Hector stays focused and learns the material?

11 Alicia is an 8 th grade student who is easily distracted. She can stay focused for short periods of time, but when a lengthy assignment is given she will fade out and not complete it. She is not a behavior problem. When Alicia is assigned 20 math problems she will usually stop at ten. However, she shows mastery of the material with those 10 problems. When graded for 20 problems she will fail because she will only have only completed 50%. Her grade will not reflect that Alicia has met the standard. What adaptation can an effective teacher use to ensure Alicia’s grades reflect that she has met the standard? Quantity

12 Substitute Curriculum James, is a student who is severely developmentally delayed and is fully included in an automotive class. While other students are exploring the “electrical current theory”, James is developing skills according to functional standards by color matching pegs to wires. What adaptation is the teacher using with James so he is successful?

13 Input Matthew is a student with a visual impairment who has difficulty reading student text. He is attending a marketing class and the textbook has many graphs with small numbers and words. What adaptations can his teacher make to ensure that Matthew is successful at mastering the standard?

14 Difficulty Terri, a student with learning disabilities in a CISCO networking class, has difficulty processing information into long-term memory. She is asked to troubleshoot a network diagnostic problem from memory with the rest of the class. What adaptation should be made so Terri masters the standard?

15 Level of Support Zach has ADHD and has serious problems staying focused and on-task. He will begin a task, but very quickly will lose his focus and become disruptive. When his behavior is pointed out to him, he can redirect his attention and continue with the task. What adaptations can his teacher make so that Zach can be successful in mastering the standard?

16 Output Sarah has great difficulty with written assignments. When asked to demonstrate by written work, her reading comprehension of the content material, Sarah will not do it. However she is very verbal and when asked to tell about what she has read, she responds articulately and shows comprehension of the material. Sarah is also very artistic and creative. What adaptation could the teacher make so that Sarah can demonstrate mastery of reading comprehension?

17 Alternate Goals Beth is a student with Developmental Disabilities. She is fully included in general education classes, but is unable to grasp all the concepts required in her math class. What adaptations could her math teacher make so that Beth can demonstrate mastery of the math standards?

18 Differentiated Instruction Strategies

19 Stations Different spots in the classroom where students work on various tasks simultaneously. These stations can be formal or informal. They can be a frequent or occasional part of the learning process. They invite flexible grouping and allow both teacher and student grouping selections. Different spots in the classroom where students work on various tasks simultaneously. These stations can be formal or informal. They can be a frequent or occasional part of the learning process. They invite flexible grouping and allow both teacher and student grouping selections.

20 Tiered Activities Tiered activities offer the teacher a strategy that exposes all kids to similar versions of the material. It may be helpful to think of the tiers as a ladder with the highest functioning kids at the top. If needed, clone the activity along the ladder to provide additional opportunities. Tiered activities offer the teacher a strategy that exposes all kids to similar versions of the material. It may be helpful to think of the tiers as a ladder with the highest functioning kids at the top. If needed, clone the activity along the ladder to provide additional opportunities.

21 Tiered Density Activities 1.Tin Can Space – geometric determination of volume 2.A Displaced Object – volume by water displacement 3.Wat-ar Densities – determination of density 4.Sink or Float – mass to volume ratios 5.Layering Liquids – density column of household liquids 6.Floating Eggs – changing density by dissolving salt in water 7.Where Do You Draw the Line? – buoancy and water displacement 8.Penny Lab – linear modeling to solve for density 9.Line on an Orange - challenging version of number six 1.Tin Can Space – geometric determination of volume 2.A Displaced Object – volume by water displacement 3.Wat-ar Densities – determination of density 4.Sink or Float – mass to volume ratios 5.Layering Liquids – density column of household liquids 6.Floating Eggs – changing density by dissolving salt in water 7.Where Do You Draw the Line? – buoancy and water displacement 8.Penny Lab – linear modeling to solve for density 9.Line on an Orange - challenging version of number six

22 Agendas Personalized lists of tasks for each student. They can be used independently or in collaboration with stations or centers. Personalized lists of tasks for each student. They can be used independently or in collaboration with stations or centers.

23 Learning Contracts Negotiated agreements between the teacher and student that give the student freedom to explore and acquire skills at their own pace. They can also offer some student choice as to what is being learned and how the information will be applied or assessed. Most contracts are a blend of expectations of working conditions and consequence (positive and negative.) They all emphasize student responsibility. Negotiated agreements between the teacher and student that give the student freedom to explore and acquire skills at their own pace. They can also offer some student choice as to what is being learned and how the information will be applied or assessed. Most contracts are a blend of expectations of working conditions and consequence (positive and negative.) They all emphasize student responsibility.

24 Centers Centers have often been described as distinct stations. For example, their may be a science center, a math center, and a home life center. The teacher will need to develop some sort of tracking device to follow student understanding. Mostly used in elementary. Centers have often been described as distinct stations. For example, their may be a science center, a math center, and a home life center. The teacher will need to develop some sort of tracking device to follow student understanding. Mostly used in elementary.

25 Choice Activities are arranged around the room students can select. Often jigsawed after. The teacher may create a tic toe board and direct a student to a particular row based on need, but the student still has a choice as to which activity to select along the row. Westward Expansion Example Westward Expansion Example Activities are arranged around the room students can select. Often jigsawed after. The teacher may create a tic toe board and direct a student to a particular row based on need, but the student still has a choice as to which activity to select along the row. Westward Expansion Example Westward Expansion Example

26 Independent Study Most effective for advanced students. This strategy is appropriate to help students learn to be independent thinkers and to help develop talents and interests in unique areas. Allows students to explore additional concepts while freeing up the teacher to work more closely with the remaining students. Most effective for advanced students. This strategy is appropriate to help students learn to be independent thinkers and to help develop talents and interests in unique areas. Allows students to explore additional concepts while freeing up the teacher to work more closely with the remaining students.

27 Portfolios Allow for independent and differentiated writing. Can offer multiple, tiered writing prompts. Portfolios are critical to the development of student writing and to the teachers ability to assess a student’s progress. Allow for independent and differentiated writing. Can offer multiple, tiered writing prompts. Portfolios are critical to the development of student writing and to the teachers ability to assess a student’s progress.

28 Universal Design for Learning Interactive Social Studies Interactive Site1Interactive Site1 Interactive Site 2Interactive Site 2Interactive Site1Interactive Site1 Interactive Site 2Interactive Site 2 Middle School History

29 Universal Design for Learning Making Text Accessible to All ELAELA Librivox

30 Universal Design for Learning Using technology to share and improve information delivery Algebra with Voice MATHEMATICSMATHEMATICS

31 Universal Design for Learning Organization to Provide a Second Look at Concepts Chemmybear Pod Cast SCIENCESCIENCE

32 Contact Information Michael Klein Michael Klein


Download ppt "Strategies for Differentiated Instruction Michael Klein MISD Science Consultant Michael Klein MISD Science Consultant New Teacher Academy March 28, 2011."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google