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The next session, Using Inquiry-based Instruction to Enhance Academics and Promote Fun Summer Learning presented by Lance Ozier, will begin at 2:00 p.m.

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Presentation on theme: "The next session, Using Inquiry-based Instruction to Enhance Academics and Promote Fun Summer Learning presented by Lance Ozier, will begin at 2:00 p.m."— Presentation transcript:

1 The next session, Using Inquiry-based Instruction to Enhance Academics and Promote Fun Summer Learning presented by Lance Ozier, will begin at 2:00 p.m. Please be sure that you hear the music playing through your speakers. Technical support is available by typing in the chat box below this PowerPoint. Online Staff Development Workshops

2 Using Inquiry-Based Instruction to Enhance Academics and Promote Fun Summer Learning Lance Ozier Education Coordinator

3 I NQUIRY -B ASED I NSTRUCTION W HAT IS IT ? Please submit your ideas by typing in the chat box.

4 I NQUIRY -B ASED I NSTRUCTION W HY S HOULD I U SE I T ? Please submit your ideas by typing in the chat box.

5 What Is Inquiry Instruction? Inquiry Instruction offers students’ opportunities to: 1. Ask open-ended questions that have: a. more than one answer b. real life implications c. relevance to students’ lives and other subject areas 2. Examine multiple perspectives in their investigation of meaningful issues 3. Construct knowledge 4. Engage in disciplined inquiry

6 What Is Inquiry Instruction? Inquiry Instruction offers students’ opportunities to: 5. Take ownership of their learning 6. Observe, collect, and organize data 7. Formulate and test working hypotheses and explanations 8. Tolerate ambiguity 9. Persist

7 C YCLE OF I NQUIRY

8 T EMPLATE FOR P LANNING I NQUIRY L ESSONS The Hook Investigations and Immersion Identifying Inquiry-Oriented Questions Levels of Inquiry Collaborative Data Investigation Finding Patterns Sharing Inquiry Findings New Questions Multiple Assessments and Reflections on the Process

9 The “Hook” Gallery Walks Scavenger Hunts Photo Collages Video/Visual Responses The Hook sparks students’ interest in the topic/s with the goal of eliciting inquiry-oriented questions and issues. What are the teachers’ implicit goals?

10 I NVESTIGATIONS AND I MMERSION Investigations and Immersion provides students with materials that give them a sense of the “landscape” of the journey they will take. Installations, galleries, web quests, demonstrations, experiments, interviews, paired and clustered texts, and multi-media are the raw materials of inquiry. This is what I call THE GRAZE. Think about: What are the materials that can be put together to offer competing, complementary, necessary information, different paths for inquiry? What do the materials teach about the processes of inquiry?

11 Identifying Inquiry-oriented Questions I wonder… I feel… I want to know… This reminds me of… I think… What do you see… What do you notice… Identifying Inquiry-Oriented Questions teaches students the process of formulating, extending, and refining questions. We can model questioning to support them. Students ask: What do I want to know more about? What is open for debate? What are relevant questions?

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13 LEVELS OF INQUIRY Levels of Inquiry incorporates opportunities (activities) for students to summarize, explain, interpret, apply shift perspective, empathize, re-question, and reflect. Students ask “Where might I go for more information, for more examples, for more questions?”

14 L EVELS OF I NQUIRY

15 C OLLABORATIVE D ATA C OLLECTION Collaborative Data Investigation enables students to talk about developing ideas and working hypotheses and to revisit and rethink their developing ideas in the presence of others. Dialogue Journals, shared inquiry on particular documents, presentations, and critique sessions.

16 COLLABORATIVE DATA COLLECTION 1. What do you know? 2. What did you learn in conversation with your partner? 3. What are you curious about? What questions linger?

17 F INDING P ATTERNS Finding Patterns promotes the use of a variety of strategies to “unpack their thinking.” Students can: describe related parts, generate relevant questions, determine “big” ideas, identify ”links” and “gaps.” Make a visual representation, a mapping of their inquiry.

18 List three aspects of fast food (OR ANY TOPIC) that are of interest, intrigue, or are mysterious to you now. 1.) 2.) 3.) What contradictions or confusions capture your attention? Choose one area of interest from your map and write a paragraph about it. Can you think of ways that you might combine the multiple areas of interest in one piece of writing? F INDING P ATTERNS

19 S HARING I NQUIRY F INDINGS

20 How could you tell people about your thoughts? Choose three possible genres that you could use to write about the complexities of fast food, issues of choice, and public health Which one will you be comfortable using? Which one will challenge you? Why is it challenging? Which one will best serve your purposes? SHARING INQUIRY FINDINGS

21 N EW Q UESTIONS New Questions reminds students to continuously refine questions and determine new questions.

22 M ULTIPLE A SSESSMENTS AND REFLECTIONS ON THE P ROCESS Multiple Assessments and Reflections on the Process incorporates a variety of assessments that encourage students to demonstrate their inquiry processes as well as they developing knowledge.

23 MULTIPLE ASSESSMENTS Requests Applications Memos Resumés and summaries Poems Plays Stories Fantasy Adventure Science fiction Historical stories Dialogues and conversations Children’s books Telegrams Editorials Commentaries Math: story problems solutions to problems record books notes and observations Responses to literature Utopian proposals Practical proposals Interviews: actual imaginary Directions: how-to school or neighborhood guide survival manual Responses and rebuttals Newspaper “fillers” Fact books or fact sheets School newspaper stories Stories or essays for local papers Proposals Case studies: Reviews: books (including textbooks) films outside reading television programs documentaries Historical “you are there” scenes Science notes: observations science notebook reading reports lab reports

24 MULTIPLE ASSESSMENTS Future options, notes on: careers, employment school and training military/public service Written debates Taking a stand: school issues family problems state or national issues moral questions Books and booklets Informational monographs Radio scripts TV scenarios and scripts Letters: personal reactions observations public/informational persuasive: to the editor to public officials to imaginary people from imaginary places Songs and ballads Demonstrations Poster displays Biographical sketches Dramatic scripts Notes for improvised drama Cartoons and cartoon strips Slide show scripts Puzzles and word searches Prophecy and predictions Photos and captions Collage, montage, mobile, sculpture Journals and diaries (real or imaginary) Anecdotes and stories: from experience as told by others Dictionaries and lexicons Technical reports school problems local issues national concerns historical problems scientific issues Thumbnail sketches: of famous people of places of content ideas of historical events Guess who/what descriptions

25 S AMPLE R UBRIC FOR R EVIEWING L EARNING O PPORTUNITIES FOR I NQUIRY AND H IGHER O RDER T HINKING Instruction/Assignment Requires Youth To: Explain Generalize Hypothesize Synthesize Interpret complex information Draw Conclusions Evaluate alternative explanations Produce new meaning and understandings Address central ideas of a topic How do you know that each of these were addressed?

26 Q&A Throughout this session, questions have been compiled. Now we have an opportunity to answer some of those questions.


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