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Advancing Assessment Literacy Designing Interventions.

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Presentation on theme: "Advancing Assessment Literacy Designing Interventions."— Presentation transcript:

1 Advancing Assessment Literacy Designing Interventions

2 Advancing Assessment Literacy Modules: Designing Interventions (February 2008) 2 The Challenge One of the most difficult aspects of creating a successful school is determining how school practices and systems can support the needs of struggling students. How do we ensure that all students have access to the supports necessary to enable them to be successful? Baker, J. & Brown, T. (2006). A pyramid of support. Leadership, 35(4), 12-15, 36.

3 Advancing Assessment Literacy Modules: Designing Interventions (February 2008) 3 The Responsive School We are going to watch video clips of two different schools in action. From Through New Eyes: Examining the Culture of Your School, 2003

4 Advancing Assessment Literacy Modules: Designing Interventions (February 2008) 4 The Responsive School Video Part I –How does the school respond when it becomes apparent that the student is not succeeding? –What message is the school sending to Johnny? –How would you describe the school’s culture? What are the assumptions, beliefs, expectations, habits, and values that seem to drive its day-to-day work? From Through New Eyes: Examining the Culture of Your School, 2003

5 Advancing Assessment Literacy Modules: Designing Interventions (February 2008) 5 The Responsive School On the following chart, list the things that are the same and different between Parts I and II of the video. SAMEDIFFERENT

6 Advancing Assessment Literacy Modules: Designing Interventions (February 2008) 6 The Responsive School On the following chart, list the assumptions, actions, or statements that drive each school. School ISchool II

7 Advancing Assessment Literacy Modules: Designing Interventions (February 2008) 7 The Responsive School Read the handout detailing the workings of four types of schools. –Which school is shown in Part I of the video? Part II? –Which of these schools is most prevalent in Canada today? –What have been the effects of these approaches to education? From Whatever it Takes, Richard Dufour, 2004

8 Advancing Assessment Literacy Modules: Designing Interventions (February 2008) 8 The Responsive School Individually, which positive elements from the video and readings would you like to see introduced or strengthened in your school? As a table group, compare your lists and reduce your combined lists to five priority areas. Be prepared to give these to your facilitator.

9 Advancing Assessment Literacy Modules: Designing Interventions (February 2008) 9 Richard Dufour We contend that a school truly committed to the concept of learning for each student will stop subjecting students to a haphazard, random, de facto educational lottery program when they struggle academically. It will stop leaving the critical question, “How will we respond when a student is not learning?” to the discretion of each teacher.

10 Advancing Assessment Literacy Modules: Designing Interventions (February 2008) 10 Richard Dufour It will instead develop consistent, systematic procedures that ensure each student is guaranteed additional time and support when needed. In fact, until the staff of a school begins to respond to students communally rather than as individuals, the school will never become a Professional Learning Community.

11 11 Pyramid of Support Intensive 5% Targeted 15% of students School Wide 80% of students Baker, J. & Brown, T. (2006). A pyramid of support. Leadership, 35(4), 12-15, 36.

12 Advancing Assessment Literacy Modules: Designing Interventions (February 2008) 12 School Wide 80% of students Most accessible level of support. All interventions can be done by the classroom teacher. 80% of students Most accessible level of support. All interventions can be done by the classroom teacher. Baker, J. & Brown, T. (2006). A pyramid of support. Leadership, 35(4), 12-15, 36.

13 Advancing Assessment Literacy Modules: Designing Interventions (February 2008) 13 Targeted 15% of students Intensity increases. Additional supports required. 15% of students Intensity increases. Additional supports required. Baker, J. & Brown, T. (2006). A pyramid of support. Leadership, 35(4), 12-15, 36.

14 Advancing Assessment Literacy Modules: Designing Interventions (February 2008) 14 Intensive 5% Require the most innovative and most specific interventions. Require close monitoring and the most accommodation. 5% Require the most innovative and most specific interventions. Require close monitoring and the most accommodation. Baker, J. & Brown, T. (2006). A pyramid of support. Leadership, 35(4), 12-15, 36.

15 Advancing Assessment Literacy Modules: Designing Interventions (February 2008) 15 The Adaptive Dimension The Adaptive Dimension refers to the concept of making adjustments in approved educational programs to accommodate diversity in student learning needs. It includes those practices the teacher undertakes to make curriculum, instruction, and the learning environment meaningful and appropriate for each student.

16 Advancing Assessment Literacy Modules: Designing Interventions (February 2008) 16 The Adaptive Dimension enables the teacher to: provide background knowledge or experience for a student when it is lacking; provide program enrichment and/or extension when it is needed; enhance student success and reduce the possibility of failure; address students' cultural needs;

17 Advancing Assessment Literacy Modules: Designing Interventions (February 2008) 17 The Adaptive Dimension enables the teacher to: accommodate community needs; increase curriculum relevance for students; lessen discrepancies between student ability and achievement; provide variety in learning materials, including community resources; and, maximize the student's potential for learning.

18 Advancing Assessment Literacy Modules: Designing Interventions (February 2008) 18 The Adaptive Dimension It is important to remember that the point of reference for the Adaptive Dimension is always the approved curriculum. Within this context, foundational objectives are not modified. The adaptive variables are adjusted so that the established curricular objectives can be achieved. Evaluation practices within the context of the adaptive dimension are also adjusted; however, such adaptations must not compromise the integrity of the formally stated curriculum objectives.

19 19 The Adaptive Dimension The Approved Curriculum Target Population FocusDecision Emphasis Classroom as one group Broad focus on all students (assessment for adaptation occurs here)  decisions about curriculum, instruction, and environment are uniformly applied to all students  standard curriculum is used  emphasis is on mastering predetermined and common curricular objectives  full repertoire of instructional approaches is employed

20 20 The Adaptive Dimension The Adaptive Dimension in the Approved Curriculum Target Population FocusDecision Emphasis Small GroupNarrower focus (refinements are based on similar interests, needs, or abilities)  curricular, instructional, or environmental adjustments are selectively and purposefully applied to similar interest, need, or ability groupings  emphasis is on enriching, extending, reinforcing, or teaching differentially to stated curricular objectives

21 21 The Adaptive Dimension The Adaptive Dimension in the Approved Curriculum Target Population FocusDecision Emphasis Individual Students Narrowest focus (refinements are very specific to individual needs)  curricular, instructional, or environmental adjustments are selectively and purposefully designed to meet individual student needs  emphasis is on tailoring the content and instructional approach in the context of individual needs so that the student achieves the objectives outlined in the approved curriculum

22 Advancing Assessment Literacy Modules: Designing Interventions (February 2008) 22 Similarities What similarities do you see between the Pyramid of Support and the Adaptive Dimension? What questions or insights do you have at this point in the process?

23 Advancing Assessment Literacy Modules: Designing Interventions (February 2008) 23 Identifying Strategies and Resources Using the supplied pyramid template, indicate what types of strategies and resources are currently available to your students at each tier of support. For example: –at the School-Wide tier differentiated instruction is a strategy available to accommodate the needs of all students. –at the Targeted tier a group of students may receive coaching from a mentor or receive support from an Educational Assistant (EA). –at the Intensive tier an individual student may receive greater support from an EA or other school division personnel.

24 Advancing Assessment Literacy Modules: Designing Interventions (February 2008) 24 Designing a System Now that you have identified the strategies and resources available, a clear system of responding to students must be put in place so that students can quickly be served as needs arise.

25 Advancing Assessment Literacy Modules: Designing Interventions (February 2008) 25 Intervention Plan Example In one Saskatchewan school division, a detailed intervention plan is in place. Following a classroom assessment, one or more of the following will happen: –If a majority of students performed below the standard, the teacher will re-teach the material for a set time each day and reassess until a majority of students have achieved the desired results. –Students with the lowest performance are sent to the resource teacher to work on specific outcomes being assessed until they meet the benchmark.

26 Advancing Assessment Literacy Modules: Designing Interventions (February 2008) 26 Intervention Plan Example –Students with designated learning or behavioural needs meet with a designated teacher daily for 30 minutes to work on all outcomes in the subject area. –Students just above the lowest group are assigned to a designated teacher who works with them for 30 minutes twice a week, providing additional instruction on all outcomes. –Students are reassessed until they meet the benchmark set by the school division.

27 27 Creating an Intervention Plan Using the supplied template, begin crafting an intervention plan that utilizes the resources currently available in your school. Focus Staff Member StudentsOutcomes Time Allocated Whole school/class Teacher? EA? Tutor? Resource teacher? Other? Which school or class? Specific outcomes? All outcomes? What frequency? How much time? Targeted Which group? Intensive Which students?

28 Advancing Assessment Literacy Modules: Designing Interventions (February 2008) 28 Reflection In what ways might I need to change my practice to make this system work? What can my colleagues expect of me as we plan to work in a team setting to meet student needs? What do I expect of my colleagues as we plan to work in a team setting to meet student needs?


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