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Martin Buber Including Thou. Introduction Why is inclusion important? How might we include persons within educational institutions? What does it mean.

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Presentation on theme: "Martin Buber Including Thou. Introduction Why is inclusion important? How might we include persons within educational institutions? What does it mean."— Presentation transcript:

1 Martin Buber Including Thou

2 Introduction Why is inclusion important? How might we include persons within educational institutions? What does it mean to be excluded within and from educational institutions? What sort of educational settings do we wish to include ourselves and others into?

3 Why is inclusion important?

4 1. Authentic inclusion takes us from the separation of the world into ‘I and It’ to the ‘I-Thou’ relation ‘All real living is meeting’ (Buber, 2004: 17).

5 I-It separation ‘The I of … I-It … has no present, only the past’ (Buber, 2004: 18) ‘experiencing and using’ (Buber, 2004: 39) ‘It exists only through being bounded by others’ (Buber, 2004: 12). I-Thou relation ‘True beings are lived in the present, the life of objects is in the past’ (Buber, 2004: 18). ‘I-Thou establishes the world of relation’ (Buber, 2004: 13). ‘when Thou is spoken, there is no thing. Thou has no bounds’ (Buber, 2004: 12)

6 The entanglement of It and Thou It is ‘the exalted melancholy of our fate, that every Thou in our world must become an It’ (Buber, 2004: 21). ‘… without It man cannot live. But he who lives with It alone is not a man’ (Buber, 2004: 32). We must live in the world of It, and in the midst of our living poise ourselves to the world of Thou.

7 2. To be included not as an individual but as a person ‘A person makes his appearance by entering into relation with other persons’ (Buber, 2004: 51)

8 The individual The individual seeks separation, proof of distinction. “The person says, ‘I am’” (Buber, 2004: 52). ‘The person looks on his Self’ (Buber, 2004: 52). The person The person: ‘Waiting, not seeking … goes his way …’ (Buber, 2004: 64). “the individual says, ‘I am such-and-such’” (Buber, 2004: 52). ‘individuality is concerned with its My – my kind, my race, my creation, my genius’ (Buber, 2004: 53).

9 The teacher with spirit Love means to learn to look at yourself The way one looks at distant things For you are only one thing among many. And whoever sees that way heals his heart, Without knowing it, from various ills A bird and a tree say to him: Friend. (Milosz, 1943/2005: 50)

10 How might we include persons within educational institutions?

11 The responsibility of the teacher to include For Buber, the responsibility of the teacher is transgressed whenever: 1.Education is reduced to a means for the undirected realisation of instincts – the teacher has a responsibility to become one ‘the forces which meet the realised instinct, namely, the educative forces’ (Buber, 1947/2006: 102). 2.Education is reduced to a series of predetermined conducts along which the young are directed – the teacher has a responsibility to include all students as unique persons

12 Releasing uniqueness:  [I]n this as in every hour, what has not been invades the structure of what is … with tens of thousand souls still undeveloped but ready to develop - a creative event if ever there was one, newness rising up, primal potential might. This potentiality, streaming unconquered, however, much of it is squandered, is the reality of the child: this phenomenon of uniqueness, which is more than just begetting and birth, this grace of beginning again and ever again. (Buber, 1947/2006: 99) Every inclusion realises the ‘grace of beginning’; each act of exclusion annuls possibilities for beginning. ‘Love is responsibility of an I for a Thou’ (Buber, 2004: 20).

13 Inclusion as dialogue ‘This almost imperceptible, most delicate approach, the rising of a finger, perhaps, or a questioning glance, is the other half of what happens in education’ (Buber, 1947/2006: 105). ‘Inclusiveness is the complete realization’ of others, ‘not by the fancy but by the actuality of the being’ (Buber, 1947/2006: 114). ‘The relation in education is one of pure dialogue’ (Buber, 1947/2006: 116).

14 Inclusion in education is one-sided However, ‘the relation of education, is based on a concrete but one-sided experience of inclusion’ (Buber, 1947/2006: 118). For Buber, it is the teacher’s responsibility which makes inclusion one-sided: the teacher is responsible to the student in a way that the student is not for the teacher.  He experiences the pupil’s being educated, but the pupil cannot experience the educator educating. The educator stands at both sides of the common situation, the pupil only at one end. (Buber, 1947/2006: 119)

15 What does it mean to be excluded within and from educational institutions?

16 Reduction of teachers to what Weber (1930: 182) called ‘specialists without spirit’ Reduction of persons to individuals with ‘special’ needs and not persons with needs mysterious and various.

17 What sort of educational settings do we wish to include ourselves and others into?

18 1. Educational settings where there are spaces and silences between persons If we were not so single-minded about keeping our lives moving, and for once could do nothing, perhaps a huge silence might interrupt this sadness of never understanding ourselves and of threatening ourselves with death. (Neruda, 1958/1975: 27-29) ‘the preparing silence’ (Buber, 2004: 89)

19 2. Where all are included; where to include one is to include all How might I include all students if I have to include this student? I include one and so illuminate the possibilities for the inclusion of all. The inclusive between, the lived moment, is simultaneously present and eternal.  Every real relation with a being or life in the world is exclusive. Its Thou is freed, steps forth, is single, and confronts you. It fills the heaves. This does not mean that nothing else exists; but all else lives in its light. (Buber, 2004: 63)

20 Conclusion Inclusion always centres us between - between educator and learner, between the known and the possible - and in this space between: ‘here is the cradle of the Real Life’ (Buber, 2004: 16). All those ‘little, nameless, unremembered, acts/ Of kindness and of love’, that Wordsworth (1798/1963: 114) reminds us comprise the ‘best portion of a good man's life’. These acts tell us that inclusion is not the terrain beyond our struggles and our questing; that inclusive education is, in Buber’s words, ‘the Kingdom that is hidden in our midst, there between us’ (Buber, 2004: 90).

21 References Buber, M. (1947/2006) Between man and man (London, Routledge) Buber, M. (2004) I and Thou (Continuum, London) Milosz, C. (1943/2005) Love, in: New and Collected Poems: (Penguin, London) Neruda, P. (1958/1975) Keeping quiet, in: Extravagaria (trans, A. Reid, Farrar, Straus & Giroux: New York) Weber, M. (1930) The Protestant ethic and the spirit of capitalism (London, George Allen and Unwin) Wordsworth, W. (1798/1963) Lines written a few miles above Tintern Abbey, in: W. Wordsworth and S.T. Coleridge Lyrical Ballads (Eds.) R.L. Brett & A.R. Jones, (London, Methuen)


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