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The world is too much with us; late and soon, Getting and spending, we lay waste our powers: Little we see in Nature that is ours; We have given our hearts.

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Presentation on theme: "The world is too much with us; late and soon, Getting and spending, we lay waste our powers: Little we see in Nature that is ours; We have given our hearts."— Presentation transcript:

1 The world is too much with us; late and soon, Getting and spending, we lay waste our powers: Little we see in Nature that is ours; We have given our hearts away, a sordid boon! The Sea that bares her bosom to the moon; The winds that will be howling at all hours, And are up-gathered now like sleeping flowers; For this, for everything, we are out of tune; It moves us not.--Great God! I'd rather be A Pagan suckled in a creed outworn; So might I, standing on this pleasant lea, Have glimpses that would make me less forlorn; Have sight of Proteus rising from the sea; Or hear old Triton blow his wreathed horn. The world is too much with us; late and soon, Getting and spending, we lay waste our powers: Little we see in Nature that is ours; We have given our hearts away, a sordid boon! The Sea that bares her bosom to the moon; The winds that will be howling at all hours, And are up-gathered now like sleeping flowers; For this, for everything, we are out of tune; It moves us not.--Great God! I'd rather be A Pagan suckled in a creed outworn; So might I, standing on this pleasant lea, Have glimpses that would make me less forlorn; The world is too much with us; late and soon, Getting and spending, we lay waste our powers: Little we see in Nature that is ours; We have given our hearts away, a sordid boon! The Sea that bares her bosom to the moon; The winds that will be howling at all hours, And are up-gathered now like sleeping flowers; For this, for everything, we are out of tune; It moves us not.--Great God! I'd rather be A Pagan suckled in a creed outworn; So might I, standing on this pleasant lea, Have glimpses that would make me less forlorn; Have sight of Proteus rising from the sea; Or hear old Triton blow his wreathed horn. The world is too much with us; late and soon, Getting and spending, we lay waste our powers: Little we see in Nature that is ours; We have given our hearts away, a sordid boon! The Sea that bares her bosom to the moon; The winds that will be howling at all hours, And are up-gathered now like sleeping flowers; For this, for everything, we are out of tune; It moves us not.--Great God! I'd rather be A Pagan suckled in a creed outworn; So might I, standing on this pleasant lea, Have glimpses that would make me less forlorn; Have sight of Proteus rising from the sea; The world is too much with us; late and soon, Getting and spending, we lay waste our powers: Little we see in Nature that is ours; We have given our hearts away, a sordid boon! The Sea that bares her bosom to the moon; The winds that will be howling at all hours, And are up-gathered now like sleeping flowers; For this, for everything, we are out of tune; It moves us not.--Great God! I'd rather be A Pagan suckled in a creed outworn; So might I, standing on this pleasant lea, Have glimpses that would make me less forlorn;

2 After reading Wordsworth’s and Baudelaire’s poetry, how do you feel each author would interpret this painting? The Café Terrace on the Place du Forum, Arles, At Night -Vincent Van Gogh

3 N -After the Enlightment -19th Century Europe -Time of Romanticism and Reason

4 W influenced by: Dorothy (sister), Samuel Coleridge (Lyrical Ballads), trips to France and Switzerland, William Taylor (headmaster) B influenced by: Edgar Allen Poe, Victor Hugo, his mother, actress Marie Daubren (his infatuation) W influenced: Victorian philosophers B influenced: Stephane Mallame (sonnet in memory), Walter Benjamin (translation), Leminy Snicket (referenced in Series of Unfortunate Events)

5 -Lake district of northwest England -Paris, France

6 -Wordsworth -Sees relationship between nature and human life -Positive insight -Imagination= powerful force -Baudelaire -Negativity -Urban vs. country

7 Romanticism -Believed in the values of passion and imagination, rejected a slavish devotion to logic and reason, discontented with a society that had become urban and industrial (pg. 52) Anti-romanticism

8 Charles Baudelaire Hatred's Cask Hatred is the cask of the pale Danaides; Bewildered Vengeance with arms red and strong Vainly pours into its empty darkness Great pailfuls of the blood and the tears of the dead; The Demon makes secret holes in this abyss, Whence would escape a thousand years of sweat and strain, Even if she could revive her victims Could restore their bodies, to squeeze them dry once more. Hatred is a drunkard in a tavern Who feels his thirst grow greater with each drink And multiply itself like the Lernaean hydra. While fortunate drinkers know they can be conquered, Hatred is condemned to this lamentable fate, That she can never fall asleep beneath the table.

9 “There, there is nothing else but grace and measure/Richness, quietness, pleasure” -A word, phrase, line, or group of lines that is repeated in a literary work -Creates effect or mood

10 -Petrarchan or Italian Sonnet -Octave -Sestet -Iambic pentameter -Political/social themes

11 -Write half a sonnet (7 lines) focusing on what you see in this room. Remember to follow the octave/sestet format! -Pick a side, either Wordsworth or Baudelaire -Feel free to try Iambic Pentameter


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