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Truck Size & Weight Reform Timothy Lynch Senior Vice President American Trucking Associations Talking Freight May 20, 2009.

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Presentation on theme: "Truck Size & Weight Reform Timothy Lynch Senior Vice President American Trucking Associations Talking Freight May 20, 2009."— Presentation transcript:

1 Truck Size & Weight Reform Timothy Lynch Senior Vice President American Trucking Associations Talking Freight May 20, 2009

2 Need for Size and Weight Reform Safety Energy and environment Meet customer demands Insufficient infrastructure capacity

3 2002 Annual Average Daily Truck Traffic

4 2035 Annual Average Daily Truck Traffic

5 Growth in Tonnage Total Increase from 2009 to 2020 Waterborne Rail Carload Trucking Rail Intermodal Air Pipeline Sources: IHS Global Insight and ATA

6 Distribution of Tonnage by Mode: 2008 vs 2020 Source: U.S. Freight Transportation Forecast to…

7 Sources: ATA & U.S. Freight Transportation Forecast to…2020 Historical Tonnage by Mode Truck Rail Interstate Highway JIT/Supply Chain Billions of Tons

8 Growth in Truck Population Classes 3-5 Class 8 Classes 6/7 Source: U.S. Freight Transportation Forecast to…2020 Millions of Trucks

9 Environmental Requirements = More Weight APU – 400 lbs Federal weight exemption 2002 engines – approx. 338 lbs 2007 engines – approx. 275 lbs 2010 engines – est. 400 lbs TOTAL = 1,400+ lbs California impact?

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11 Truck Size and Weight Reform Some Interstate weight limits in many states frozen in time for more than 50 years. No major weight increase in 35 years 73,280 lbs to 80,000 lbs in Weight increased 9% in 50 years LCV freeze Requests for Exemptions (Logging etc)

12 Operating Equipment Productivity: Ocean Intermodal - Volume 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 14,000 16,000 18, Year TEUs Percentage change in TEU capacity = 300% Source: Wilbur Smith Associates

13 Operating Equipment Productivity: Rail Intermodal - Volume 0 100, , , , , , , Year Cubic Feet Percentage change in capacity = 200% Source: Wilbur Smith Associates

14 Operating Equipment Productivity: Grain/Coal Trains - Weight Year Tons 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 14,000 16,000 18,000 20,000 Percentage change in capacity = 93% Source: Wilbur Smith Associates

15 Year Cubic Feet Percentage change in capacity = 18% Operating Equipment Productivity: Truck - Volume Source: Wilbur Smith Associates

16 Year Pounds Percentage change in capacity = 9% Operating Equipment Productivity: Truck - Weight Source: Wilbur Smith Associates

17 Comparative Growth in Modal Operating Equipment Productivity Year Truck Weight Truck Cube Train Weight Train Cube Ship Cube 300 % 250 % 200 % 150 % 100 % 50 % 0 Percent Change Source: Wilbur Smith Associates

18 STANDARDIZE 53’ TRAILER Increase minimum trailer length on National Network from 48’ to 53’ Cap trailer length on NN at 53’ States currently allowing longer trailers grandfathered

19 WGA Harmonization Study States Colorado Idaho Kansas Montana Nebraska Nevada North Dakota Oklahoma Oregon South Dakota Utah Washington Wyoming

20 Light Rocky Mountain Double 7+ Axles, Maximum GVW – 117,000 Pounds Maximum Combined Trailer Length 81 Feet Maximum Trailer Lengths Front – 48 Feet*, Rear – 28.5 Feet Restricted to National Network * ATA suggests use of 53ft trailer

21 Heavy Intermediate Length Double 9-11 Axles, Maximum GVW – 129,000 Pounds Maximum Combined Trailer Length 81 Feet Trailer Lengths Front – 40 Feet, Rear – 24 Feet Restricted to National Network

22 Long Doubles 9+ Axles Maximum Trailer Length 45* Feet or 48* Feet Maximum GVW 129,000 Pounds Restricted to Interstate Highways * ATA suggests use of 53 ft trailers

23 Triples 7-8 Axles, Maximum GVW – 110,000 Pounds Maximum Trailer Lengths – 28.5 Feet Restricted to Interstate System Use of “Marshaling Yards”

24 Single Trailer Weight Increase Maintain current federal axle weight and bridge formula limits, but lift the 80,000 lbs GVW cap Single-trailer trucks with a GVW of 97,000 lbs Six axles, including a tridem axle on the rear of the trailer Maximum weight on the tridem axle limited to 51,000 lbs H.R. 1799

25 Benefits of the 6-Axle Truck Safety Similar operational characteristics to 5-axle Reduced VMT lowers accident exposure Fuel consumption and emissions reduced 17% per ton-mile after accounting for MPG loss Lower VMT should produce a small but measurable reduction in congestion Will bring down transportation costs, thus lowering overall U.S. manufacturing, agricultural and retail costs

26 Benefits of the 6-Axle Truck Pavement maintenance costs reduced $2.5 billion over 20 years Bridges State flexibility whether and where to allow trucks to operate will allow states to minimize cost impacts Shifting heavy trucks from local roads to Interstates will lower costs in some states Harmonization with international community

27 LCV Operations Beyond the Western Uniformity Region On a case-by-case basis, support local, state and regional efforts to improve truck productivity and expand LCV routes that meet appropriate safety standards. Lift the 80,000 lbs GVW cap for STAA doubles (double 28.5’ trailers). Allow double trailers longer than 28.5’ (e.g. double 33’ trailers).

28 Autohauler 10% Weight Tolerance More than 52% of motor vehicles sold minivans, pick-ups, SUVs. While larger vehicle sales are declining, sales of hybrids are increasing Large hybrid SUVs weigh up to 1,900 pounds more than non-hybrid version of the same vehicle Weight of a hybrid passenger car can exceed non- hybrid weight by more than four hundred pounds.

29 THREE TRUCKS OR TWO – WHAT’S NOT TO LIKE? TO MOVE SIX STEEL COILS YOU NEEDTO MOVE SIX STEEL COILS YOU NEED 3 TRACTORS2 TRACTORS 3 TRAILER2 TRAILERS 3 DRIVERS2 DRIVERS

30 Real-World Impacts of Heavier Trucks International Paper Reduce # of trucks needed to service Courtland, Ala. plant from 600 to 450 per week 94,200 fewer miles 130,000 lbs less CO 2 5,250,000 lbs less truck weight on highways

31 Real-World Impacts of Heavier Trucks Kraft Foods 2,150 truckloads per year from Champaign, IL to Norcross, GA could be reduced to 1, ,500 fewer miles 33,000 gallons less fuel 730,000 pounds CO 2 Nationwide Impacts 66,000 fewer loads 33 million fewer miles driven 6.6 million gallons of fuel saved 73,000 tons CO 2 emissions eliminated

32 Real-World Impacts of Heavier Trucks MillerCoors 2,473 fewer trucks/week, a reduction of 25% 1,115,422 fewer vehicle miles/week $90,412/week in fuel savings (at $2.25/gallon) 4,538,753 lbs/week in reduced CO 2 emissions 86,562,669 lbs/week in reduced wear and tear on roads and bridges

33 Thank you!


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