Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

2.5 Student Book © 2004 Propane Education & Research Council 2.5 Operating a Truck, Tank Trailer or Tractor/Trailer to Deliver or Relocate ASME Tanks.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "2.5 Student Book © 2004 Propane Education & Research Council 2.5 Operating a Truck, Tank Trailer or Tractor/Trailer to Deliver or Relocate ASME Tanks."— Presentation transcript:

1 2.5 Student Book © 2004 Propane Education & Research Council 2.5 Operating a Truck, Tank Trailer or Tractor/Trailer to Deliver or Relocate ASME Tanks

2 Consult local jurisdictions for applicable codes, standard and legal requirements This material is not an exhaustive treatment of the subject and does not preclude other procedures to enhance safe LP-gas operations This publication is not intended nor should it be construed to 1.Set forth procedures which are the general custom or practice in the propane industry 2.Establish the legal standards of care owed by propane distributors to their customers 3.Prevent the reader from using different methods to implement applicable codes, standards or legal require- ments. CETP Program Disclaimer

3 This training material was designed to be used as a resource only and does not replace federal, state, local, or company safety rules. The user of this material is solely responsible for the method of implementation. The Propane Education and Research Council, the National Propane Gas Association and Industrial Training Services, Inc. assume no liability for reliance on the contents of this training material. Issuance of this material is not intended to nor should it be construed as an undertaking to perform services on be- half of any party either for their protection or for the protection of third parties. CETP Program Disclaimer

4 Learning Aids—These margin notes are provided to help you identify sources, take precautions, or give guidance on your job. Symbols Warning: Important precaution that you should always remember when performing the identified task. Tools: This task requires special tools or procedures. PPE: This is a task that requires personal protection equipment. Paper Work or Forms: This task should be documented on your company’s forms for compliance or legal reasons. Safety Procedure: For your safety special precautions and safety guidelines apply to this task or operation of equipment. Company S.O.P. : Follow your company’s Standard Operating Practices (or Procedures). If you’re not sure of your company’s policy, check with your supervisor. 2.5 Student Book © 2004 Propane Education & Research Council

5 Electrical Hazard: This task involves an electrical hazard. Lockout and Tagout procedures must be followed. Explosive/Fire Hazard: This task involves a fire or explosion hazard. Use appropriate precautions. Lockout and Tagout procedures may apply. Technical Tips: This technique may be very useful as you do a task. Technical Tip The National Fire Protection Association: References to sections of the LP-Gas Codes and Standards. NFPA 54 Or NFPA 58 U.S. Department of Transportation: DOT has regulatory authority, both interstate and intrastate, over the transportation of hazardous materials. References to Title 49, Code of Federal Regulations. Department of Labor: (OSHA) administers federal employee safety and health regulations. 2.5 Student Book © 2004 Propane Education & Research Council

6 2.5.1 Student Book © 2004 Propane Education & Research CouncilPage 1 Transporting and installing ASME tanks is a task required whenever the company gains or loses a customer and when customer propane supply needs change Identifying Equipment and Operating Procedures Typically Used on ASME Tank Delivery Vehicles In this module, you will learn to identify: (1) DOT hazardous materials regulations for transporting tanks (2) Types of ASME delivery vehicles (3) Auxiliary equipment used for tank delivery vehicles

7 2.5.1 Student Book © 2004 Propane Education & Research CouncilPage 1 DOT Hazardous Materials Regulations 1.ASME propane tanks used for permanent installation at customer locations that have water capacities larger than 125 gallons must not be transported on public roadways if they contain more than 5% liquid propane. 2.During transportation, propane tanks with water gallon capacities less than 1,000 gallons containing propane must be labeled on two sides using either FLAMMABLE GAS labels (sometimes called “4 by 4 shipping labels”) or LP-gas placards.

8 2.5.1 Student Book © 2004 Propane Education & Research CouncilPage 1 DOT Hazardous Materials Regulations 3.During transportation, propane tanks with water gallon capacities larger than 1,000 gallons, but less than 5,000 gallons, that contain propane must be labeled on both sides and both ends using either FLAMMABLE GAS labels (sometimes called “4 by 4 shipping labels”) or LP-gas placards. 4.Tanks larger than 5,000 gallons (640 cubic feet) must have placards on both sides and both ends during transportation.

9 2.5.1 Student Book © 2004 Propane Education & Research CouncilPage 1 Types of ASME Tank Delivery Vehicles Tank delivery vehicles that are used for the transportation of ASME tanks consist of three main types. 1.Straight Trucks 2.Tractor-Trailer Vehicles 3. Combination Vehicles

10 2.5.1 Student Book © 2004 Propane Education & Research CouncilPage 2 Types of ASME Tank Delivery Vehicles Straight Truck Tank Delivery Vehicles – Tank delivery trucks, sometimes called “boom” or “winch” trucks are equipped with service beds that are flat decks of steel or steel and wood construction, fitted with pockets and rails for tank securing devices. Figure 1. Combination Service Bed with Removable Stake Panels

11 2.5.1 Student Book © 2004 Propane Education & Research CouncilPage 2 Types of ASME Tank Delivery Vehicles Straight Truck Tank Delivery Vehicles Figure 2. Stake Panels and Lift Gate

12 2.5.1 Student Book © 2004 Propane Education & Research CouncilPage 3 Types of ASME Tank Delivery Vehicles Straight Truck Tank Delivery Vehicles –Tank dollies may be used to install or retrieve tanks in locations not accessible to tank setting trailers or tank delivery trucks. Figure 3. Two Styles of Tank Dollies

13 2.5.1 Student Book © 2004 Propane Education & Research CouncilPage 3 Types of ASME Tank Delivery Vehicles Full Hydraulic Cranes Figure 4. Full Hydraulic Crane

14 2.5.1 Student Book © 2004 Propane Education & Research CouncilPage 3 Types of ASME Tank Delivery Vehicles Electric/Hydraulic Cranes Figure 5. Electric/Hydraulic Crane

15 2.5.1 Student Book © 2004 Propane Education & Research CouncilPage 4 Types of ASME Tank Delivery Vehicles Winch Cranes These are sometimes called “A-frame” or “gin pole” cranes, these cranes typically use a PTO-connected, gear-driven winch to raise and lower the boom, and separately raise and lower the ASME tank using a cable and pulley block. Winch cranes are not as widely used in the propane industry compared to the other types of cranes.

16 2.5.1 Student Book © 2004 Propane Education & Research CouncilPage 4 Types of ASME Tank Delivery Vehicles Tractor/Trailer Tank Delivery Vehicles – The tractor/trailer is a standard flat bed or low-boy flat bed type with or without lifting equipment. Figure 6. Flat Bed Tractor/Trailer

17 2.5.1 Student Book © 2004 Propane Education & Research CouncilPage 5 Types of ASME Tank Delivery Vehicles Tractor/Trailer Tank Delivery Vehicles Figure 7. Tank Manufacturer Pick-Up and Delivery Tractor/Trailer

18 2.5.1 Student Book © 2004 Propane Education & Research CouncilPage 5 Types of ASME Tank Delivery Vehicles Tank Setting Trailers – Tank setting trailers consist of a towing vehicle (usually a pickup or service truck) and a tank setting trailer and are used to install ASME tanks at residential and small commercial customer locations. Figure 8. Tank Setting Trailer

19 2.5.1 Student Book © 2004 Propane Education & Research CouncilPage 6 Types of ASME Tank Delivery Vehicles Note: A fourth type of tank delivery vehicle in limited use for specialized tank transportation is the intermodal tank chassis. This type consists of a tractor and trailer that has cross members designed to support and secure the heavy duty bolsters built into DOT IM portable tanks’ support skids. Intermodal Tank Trailers

20 2.5.1 Student Book © 2004 Propane Education & Research CouncilPage 6 Auxiliary Equipment Fire Extinguishers If the extinguisher is damaged, does not indicate proper pressure, has missing parts or is past due for an annual inspection it should be tagged, removed from the truck and replaced with an extinguisher that is in good condition and properly inspected.

21 2.5.1 Student Book © 2004 Propane Education & Research CouncilPage 6 Auxiliary Equipment Placard Holders – Placard holders should be located on the front, back and both sides of the vehicle. A UN 1075 placard should be displayed in each holder when trans-porting tanks that have a gross weight (weight of the tank and maximum propane capacity of the tank) of 1,001 or more pounds. When the vehicle is empty, displaying the LP-gas or any other hazardous material placard is prohibited.

22 2.5.1 Student Book © 2004 Propane Education & Research CouncilPage 7 Auxiliary Equipment Chock Blocks Chock blocks are required by some companies’ policies and procedures on their container delivery vehicles. If required by company procedures, placing chock blocks to prevent movement of the vehicle is generally required when the vehicle is parked, and during tank loading or unloading. Be sure you comply with your company’s procedures.

23 2.5.1 Student Book © 2004 Propane Education & Research CouncilPages Time to See If You Got the Key Points of This Module… Complete the Review on pages 8. See if you are ready for the Certification Exam by checking off the performance criteria on page 9.


Download ppt "2.5 Student Book © 2004 Propane Education & Research Council 2.5 Operating a Truck, Tank Trailer or Tractor/Trailer to Deliver or Relocate ASME Tanks."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google