Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Traffic Control Plan Development Course

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Traffic Control Plan Development Course"— Presentation transcript:

1 Traffic Control Plan Development Course
Module 2 Temporary Traffic Control Overview

2 General A Temporary Traffic Control (TTC) Zone (aka Work Zone)
Work Space Incident Controlled by TTC Devices (Chapter 3) Flaggers Uniformed Law Enforcement Other Authorized Personnel

3 General Safety is a PRIMARY concern Must provide:
safe work place safe route for the pedestrian safe route for the motorist This Manual/Course cover longer term TTC that will require plans

4 Mn MUTCD Chapter 6B

5 Mn MUTCD Chapter 6B Fundamental Principles of Temporary Traffic Control Construction, maintenance, utility, and incident zones can all benefit from TTC Special plans preparation and coordination required Commercial vehicles might need to follow a different route Following the fundamental principles of Part 6 will assist road users help protect workers in the vicinity of TTC zones

6 Mn MUTCD Chapter 6B Seven fundamental principles of TTC
Page 2-2 through page 2-3 Seven fundamental principles of TTC General plans or guidelines should be developed Road user movement should be inhibited as little as practical Motorists, bicyclists, and pedestrians should be guided in a clear and positive manner Routine day and night inspections of TTC elements should be performed Attention should be given to the maintenance of roadside safety Training appropriate to the job Maintain good public relations

7 Legal Authority for Transportation
Legal authority for transportation is found in the Minnesota Statutes, Chapters 160 to 174A

8 Federal Regulations Title 23 of the United States Code (U.S.C)
outlines the role of highways in the United States Code (www.ecfr.gov/) Part 630 Subpart J covers Work Zone Safety and Mobility Subpart K outlines Temporary Traffic Control Devices A copy of Subpart J and K is included in the Appendix

9 Why Signs are Installed
MN MUTCD discussed on Page 2-10 Why Signs are Installed Engineering Standards MN MUTCD A statement of required, mandatory, or specifically prohibitive practice regarding a traffic control device. The verb “shall” is typically used. Standards are sometimes modified by Options A statement of recommended, but not mandatory, practice in typical situations, with deviations allowed if engineering judgment or engineering study indicates the deviation to be appropriate. The verb “should” is typically used. Guidance statements are sometimes modified by Options

10 Why Signs are Installed
Engineering Standards MN MUTCD A statement of practice that is a permissive condition and carries no requirement or recommendation. Options may contain allowable modifications to a Standard or Guidance. The verb “may” is typically used An informational statement that does not convey any degree of mandate, recommendation, authorization, prohibition, or enforceable condition. The verbs “shall”, “should”, and “may” are not used in Support statements

11 Associated Manuals and Guideline
Work Zone Manuals and Guidelines Website

12 Associated Manuals and Guideline
Federal Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) publishes the MUTCD all national design, application, and placement, standards, guidance, options, and support provisions for traffic control devices

13 Associated Manuals and Guideline
Minnesota Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices Minnesota develops and adopts a state MUTCD substantial conformance with the Federal MUTCD updated in January 2014 Sections 6A through 6K

14 Associated Manuals and Guideline
Temporary Traffic Control Zone Layouts Field Manual (MN MUTCD Chapter 6K) Part 6 of the MN MUTCD reprinted as a separate document for use in field operations contains the general Temporary Traffic Control (TTC) Used by any MN entities to provide PROPER TTC

15 Associated Manuals and Guideline
Traffic Engineering Manual updated by the MnDOT OTST establish uniform guidelines and procedures Chapter 8 is related to Work Zone Traffic Controls

16 Associated Manuals and Guideline
Standard Specifications for Construction (2014 Edition) contains standard specifications used and referred to in the design of plans Special Provisions More info in Chapter 6

17 Associated Manuals and Guideline
Page 2-14 Minnesota IWZ Toolbox For design of Intelligent Work Zones Travel Time Information Speed Advisory Information Congestion Advisory Stopped Traffic Advisory Dynamic Merge - Late or Early Traffic Responsive Temporary Signals Etc. Some Warrants at Enterprise website

18 Associated Manuals and Guideline
More info in Section Work Zone Speed Limit Guidelines provide a uniform guideline for the proper application of speed limits in street and highway work zones Engineering judgment may dictate modifications

19 Associated Manuals and Guideline
2012 CMS Manual of Practice Guide for MnDOT internal stakeholders and external stakeholders Info on allowable and prohibited messages

20 Signing Overview Associated Manuals Minnesota Standard Signs Manual
The Standard Signs Manual contains a wide variety of standard signs that are used in the state

21 Signing Overview Associated Manuals Standard Signs Summary

22 Size of Sign Example From Signs 101 So What? 24” x 30” 48” x 96”

23 Associated Manuals and Guideline
Additional Manuals and Guidelines Previous discussions were a sampling Fully investigate Work Zone website Resources are constantly updated

24 Work Zone Safety Mobility Tech Memo
Subject: Minnesota Work Zone Safety and Mobility Policy Purpose: To implement the requirements and guidelines contained in the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 23 Part 630, Subpart J

25 Work Zone Safety Mobility Tech Memo
Page 2-20 INTRODUCTION Safety and mobility of road users and highway workers Aging Highway System All involved must commit to safety and mobility Start early in the project Carry through to the end

26 Work Zone Safety Mobility Tech Memo
Addressed in Three Levels 1. Project Level Procedures Work Zone Mobility Impact Assessment Transportation Management Plan (TMP) Plans, Specifications and Estimates (PS&Es) Project Temporary Traffic Control (TTC) Field Observations

27 Work Zone Safety Mobility Tech Memo
Addressed in Three Levels 2. District or Local Agency Level Process and Procedures Establishment of a Work Zone Safety Coordinator Operational Performance Information Work Zone Crash Data Review

28 Work Zone Safety Mobility Tech Memo
Addressed in Three Levels 3. State Level Processes and Procedures Statewide Work Zone Data Statewide Field Reviews Training Process Feed-Back Discussions Statewide Group Activities

29 Work Zone Safety Mobility Tech Memo
Scope Apply to federal and non-federal aid Should be implemented on maintenance and utility operations PROJECT LEVEL PROCESSES AND PROCEDURES Attention must be given to traffic mobility and safety from the early stages of development Proper TMP can be developed

30 Work Zone Safety Mobility Tech Memo
Work Zone Mobility Impact Assessment Identify the potential impact the project provide guidelines for developing the strategies to mitigate Implement a general traffic delay restriction policy for their jurisdiction May have an established “Lane Closure Manual” Metro Lane Closure Manual

31 Work Zone Safety Mobility Tech Memo
Work Zone Mobility Impact Assessment If no Manual On 2-lane 2-way roadways, traffic should not be stopped (such as a flagging operation) for greater than 15 minutes On multi-lane roadways, traffic volumes should not exceed 1800 vehicles per hour per open lane

32 Work Zone Safety Mobility Tech Memo

33 Work Zone Safety Mobility Tech Memo

34 Work Zone Safety Mobility Tech Memo

35 Work Zone Safety Mobility Tech Memo

36 Work Zone Safety Mobility Tech Memo
Page 2-23 More info in Sec 2.8 Transportation Management Plan Prepared with assistance of road authority Tasks include listing all potential work zone impacted services, businesses

37 Work Zone Safety Mobility Tech Memo
Att. A Page 2-32 Refer to Attachment A Project Characteristics Travel and Traffic Characteristics Corridor, Network and Community Issues Design, Procurement and Construction Options Work Zone Design and Safety Issues TTC Strategy Considerations TO Strategy Considerations PI Strategy Considerations

38 Work Zone Safety Mobility Tech Memo
Att. B Page 2-36 Refer to Attachment B

39 Work Zone Safety Mobility Tech Memo

40 Work Zone Safety Mobility Tech Memo

41 Work Zone Safety Mobility Tech Memo
Page 2-24 Scope of the TMP (page 2-24) Minimal to complex projects Short duration may not require a TMP Basic TMP shall have provisions for a TTC plan Plans, Specifications, and Estimates (PS&Es) Include appropriate provisions of the TMP Pay Items Responsible persons Project TTC Field Observations Drive through reviews Revisions to TTC plans

42 Planning for TTC Oversize/Overweight Vehicles
Page 2-39 Oversize/Overweight Vehicles Oversize/overweight (OSOW) vehicles need to be considered May be difficult or impossible for OSOW vehicles to navigate the work zone Contact the permits department

43 Planning for TTC Lane Width
In some TTC areas, reduced lane widths are used to maintain the number of lanes Important to communicate with all interested departments

44 Source: Ken Johnson Presentation
Planning for TTC Source: Ken Johnson Presentation Speed Limits in Work Zones MN Statutes , Subd. 5d went into effect August 1, 2014 Modified speed limits and fines in work zones

45 Planning for TTC Speed Limits in Work Zones
Speed limit in work zone when workers present The speed limit on a road having an established speed limit of 50 mph or greater is adjusted to 45 mph in a work zone (remember definition) when… At least one lane or portion of a lane of traffic is closed in either direction Workers are present Exceptions follow -

46 Planning for TTC Workers Present Speed Limit
The required work zone speed limit of 45 mph does not apply when… Positive barriers are placed between workers and the traveled portion of the highway

47 Planning for TTC Workers Present Speed Limit
The required work zone speed limit of 45 mph does not apply when… The work zone is in place for less than 24 hours

48 Planning for TTC Workers Present Speed Limit
The required work zone speed limit of 45 mph does not apply when… “A different speed limit for the work zone is determined by the road authority following an engineering and traffic investigation, and based on accepted engineering practice” 24/7 construction speed limit Commissioners Order required Start with District Traffic, needs CO approval

49 Planning for TTC Workers Present Speed Limit
The required work zone speed limit of 45 mph does not apply when… A reduced speed limit for the work zone is established by the road authority for a road under their jurisdiction when workers are present (an engineering and traffic investigation is not required) No more than 20 mph on a street or highway with an established speed limit of 55 mph or greater No more than 15 mph on a street or highway with an established speed limit of 50 mph or less The “Other” Workers Present Speed Limit or agency determined (see upcoming slide)

50 Planning for TTC Workers Present Speed Limit
The required work zone speed limit of 45 mph does not apply when… Added in the proposed revision to the MN MUTCD On the roadway of a divided highway with a median that does not include a TTC zone

51 Planning for TTC Agency Determined Workers Present Speed Limit
Only requires: In Work Zone Workers Present Determined by DTE or designee

52 Planning for TTC What Projects May be Affected?
Types of projects that may be affected by this new law – required reduction Pavement rehabilitation (reclaim and overlay, mill and overlay, overlay, chip seals, micro surfaces) Pavement patching and crack sealing Reconstruction projects Multi-day culvert replacement (at one location) Bridge construction/repair Installation of an intersection traffic control device (e.g. traffic signal or roundabout)

53 TEM 8-4.00 8-4.01 Temporary Traffic Control Goals
Page 2-41 Temporary Traffic Control Goals Strive for the greatest payoff in terms of safety and convenience What is the likelihood of motorists failing to negotiate the work zone safely? What are the consequences of such action on pedestrians, workers, or other motorists? Goals to minimize crashes and crash severity; and to minimize inconvenience and conflicts as a result of the work

54 TEM Page through Page 2-44 Traffic Management and Temporary Traffic Control Plan Purpose of the TMP Scope of the TMP Temporary Traffic Control Plan Responsibility Preliminary Design Detail Design Construction

55 TEM Appendix Page 2-45 Traffic Management Plan Checklist

56 TEM Appendix Traffic Management Plan Checklist

57 TEM Appendix Traffic Management Plan Checklist

58 TEM Appendix Traffic Management Plan Checklist

59 TEM Appendix Traffic Management Plan Checklist

60 TEM Appendix Traffic Management Plan Checklist

61 TEM Appendix Traffic Management Plan Checklist

62 TEM Appendix Traffic Management Plan Checklist

63 TEM Appendix Traffic Management Plan Checklist

64 TEM Appendix Traffic Management Plan Checklist

65 TEM Appendix Traffic Management Plan Checklist

66 TEM Appendix Traffic Management Plan Checklist

67 TEM Appendix Traffic Management Plan Checklist

68 TEM Appendix Traffic Management Plan Checklist

69 TEM Appendix Traffic Management Plan Checklist

70 TMP Development TMP Development Tips Start early Coordinate early
Page 2-52 TMP Development Tips Start early TMP development should start as early in the project development process as possible so that TMP strategies can be accounted for in the budgeting/scoping process Coordinate early Effective TMP is one that has input from all of the key players in the project development process Ensure all are involved from the start of TMP development

71 TMP Development TMP Development Tips
Use templates, guidance and other tools Templates, guidance, and other standardized agency resources help ensure that TMPs within an agency are consistent These tools also simplify TMP development by helping those developing TMPs understand what is expected for agency TMPs Provide TMP Training Helps ensure consistent TMPs Also helps personnel understand why TMPs are important Helps gain management buy-in for TMPs, as management support is needed for effective TMP efforts

72 TMP Development TMP Development Tips
Assess, Monitor and Update the TMP Include funding for monitoring traffic conditions during construction to track TMP effectiveness Can be a challenge because it requires additional time beyond just developing the TMP Monitoring and updating the TMP as the project progresses or new potential impacts are discovered is important to ensuring the TMP remains effective at increasing work zone safety and mobility

73 TMP Development TMP Development Tips Document everything
TMP becomes a written history of the project If design and development decisions are well documented, time, energy and money can be saved in the development of the project, as well as future projects A brief standardized report at the completion of major projects that describes the TMP development and implementation process and outcomes can be very beneficial to future projects

74 TMP Development TMP Development Tips Understand diversion rates
Accurate estimates of diversion rates can be useful Some people will divert to an alternate route This reduction in demand may make a broader range of construction and MOT options feasible, possibly reducing project or TMP cost Facilitate use of alterative routes Look into the feasibility of alternate routes early in the TMP process If improvements are needed to alternate routes, schedule that work at least a year prior to the project so that the alternate routes can be ready for use once the project begins

75 TMP Development TMP Development Tips
Use strategies that keep lanes open Some examples are imposing damages for late lane opening; contract incentives/disincentives; narrowing lane widths or occasionally using shoulders during peak periods to maintain the number of lanes; night work Consider using extended closures vs. full closures vs. numerous night closures Extended and full closures can greatly reduce overall construction time and in many studies, it has been found that the public prefers one long-term closure to numerous smaller closures because the work can be completed sooner

76 Pedestrian Treatments
Background ADA of 1990 Adoption of PROWAG Tech Memo TR-01

77 Tech Memo 12-03-T-02 Introduction Purpose
Ped facilities required on public ROW for disabled Purpose Planning and design guidance for accessible ped facilities

78 Tech Memo 12-03-T-02 Guidelines Scoping
Page and Page 2-56 Guidelines Scoping New construction and reconstruction Alteration Projects Preventative maintenance projects Historical Properties Accessibility during construction

79 Checklist for Peds in TTC

80 Checklist for Peds in TTC

81 Checklist for Peds in TTC

82 Checklist for Peds in TTC

83 End of Chapter 2 Questions?


Download ppt "Traffic Control Plan Development Course"

Similar presentations


Ads by Google