Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Research A Primer. Plagiarism To avoid plagiarism, you must give credit whenever you use To avoid plagiarism, you must give credit whenever you use.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Research A Primer. Plagiarism To avoid plagiarism, you must give credit whenever you use To avoid plagiarism, you must give credit whenever you use."— Presentation transcript:

1 Research A Primer

2

3 Plagiarism To avoid plagiarism, you must give credit whenever you use To avoid plagiarism, you must give credit whenever you use Another person’s opinion or theory Facts, statistics, any info not common knowledge Quotations from actual or written words Paraphrasing / summarizations of another’s words

4 What does that mean for you? This means your essay will have a lot of parenthetic notation. How do you make sure it’s not too much? This means your essay will have a lot of parenthetic notation. How do you make sure it’s not too much? 1. Introduce and conclude each paragraph in your own words, with your own findings; 2. Rephrase a source’s words once you’ve given credit; 3. Insert your own ideas—bring something new!

5 Example For the following sample paragraph, use this key: Red information has been paraphrased or summarized; Aqua information is quoted, which is used sparingly; Black information comes directly from the author of the paper and is usually found at the beginning and end of the paragraph, or during transitions.

6 Surprisingly, there is some research to show that a real King Arthur did exist, although not as we know him. Centuries before the Medieval period, there lived a king named Arturus, “who championed the Celtic Britons' cause against the Anglo-Saxons in the 5th century” (Brooke 110). This man may have been a military leader of some sort, and his name may have been derived from a title meaning “bear” (Brooke 110). But if the time was so obviously different, why is he often portrayed as a Chivalrous king of England’s Dark Ages? Perhaps that was because, according to Melissa Snell, writers for hundreds of years “followed a common custom of medieval art and literature. In matters of detail such as clothing, armor, shelter and transportation, they used the trappings of their own time” (38). In that case, a leader might have been shown to wield swords and wear plate armor, even though a Celtic chieftain would never have done so. Therefore, the Arthur most people know is an Arthur that never existed; a new man must be discovered.

7 Types of Notes Direct quotations – using material word for word Direct quotations – using material word for word use quotation marks use quotation marks note the page number and author note the page number and author Example: “Novice writers often unintentionally plagiarize” (Williams 49).

8 Types of Notes Paraphrase – put into your own words what someone else has written or said; paraphrased ideas are borrowed, not original. You MUST give your sources. Paraphrase – put into your own words what someone else has written or said; paraphrased ideas are borrowed, not original. You MUST give your sources. Example: Novice writers often unintentionally plagiarize, as noted before, because they fail to recognize the necessity to attribute paraphrased, summarized, and borrowed ideas to their original owners. Example: Novice writers often unintentionally plagiarize, as noted before, because they fail to recognize the necessity to attribute paraphrased, summarized, and borrowed ideas to their original owners. Beginning writers often plagiarize because they do not realize that what they know comes directly from what they have just read (Williams 49). Beginning writers often plagiarize because they do not realize that what they know comes directly from what they have just read (Williams 49).

9 Types of Notes Summary – condense information in your own words; summarized ideas are borrowed, not original. You MUST give your sources. Summary – condense information in your own words; summarized ideas are borrowed, not original. You MUST give your sources. Example: Novice writers often unintentionally plagiarize, as noted before, because they fail to recognize the necessity to attribute paraphrased, summarized, and borrowed ideas to their original owners. Example: Novice writers often unintentionally plagiarize, as noted before, because they fail to recognize the necessity to attribute paraphrased, summarized, and borrowed ideas to their original owners. Students who plagiarize are often unaware that they are doing so (Williams 49). Students who plagiarize are often unaware that they are doing so (Williams 49).

10 Types of Notes Original ideas – your comments, judgments, connections, etc.; no need to give your source Original ideas – your comments, judgments, connections, etc.; no need to give your source Example: Many juniors at Loyola Blakefield High School have no idea what plagiarism really is; they will go on to college setting themselves up for disappointment. Example: Many juniors at Loyola Blakefield High School have no idea what plagiarism really is; they will go on to college setting themselves up for disappointment.

11 Using Notecards Once you have a source, determine important information and take a note of it on a card; one note per card. Once you have a source, determine important information and take a note of it on a card; one note per card. 1. Identify the source (author, webpage, etc.) 2. Identify the page number 3. Use quotation marks to show a direct quote

12 Possible evidence of the existence of Arthur, the legendary warrior king, has been found at Tintagel in Cornwall. A Cornish slate with sixth-century engravings was found in July on the eastern terraces of Tintagel on the edge of a cliff overlooking the place traditionally known as Merlin's Cave. It was discovered under broken pottery and glass from the late sixth or seventh centuries during the re-excavations of an area last dug in the 1930s. The 8 inch by 14 inch slate bears two inscriptions. The older, upper letters have been broken off and cannot be deciphered. The lower inscription, translated by Charles Thomas of the University of Glasgow, reads "Pater Coliavi ficit Artognov--Artognou, father of a descendant of Coll, has had this built." The inscription is basically in Latin, perhaps with some primitive Irish and British elements, according to Thomas. The British name represented by the Latin Atrognov is Arthnou. Geoffrey Wainwright of English Heritage says that the name is close enough to refer to Arthur, the legendary king and warrior. Thomas, however, believes that we must dismiss ideas that the name is associated with King Arthur. Christopher Morris, professor of archaeology at the University of Glasgow and the director of the excavations, feels that the script does not necessarily refer to Arthur, because King Arthur first entered the historical domain in the twelfth century. “King Arthur Was Real?” by Amelie Walker in Archaelogy Today Direct Quote Paraphrase

13 Possible evidence of the existence of Arthur, the legendary warrior king, has been found at Tintagel in Cornwall. A Cornish slate with sixth-century engravings was found in July on the eastern terraces of Tintagel on the edge of a cliff overlooking the place traditionally known as Merlin's Cave. It was discovered under broken pottery and glass from the late sixth or seventh centuries during the re-excavations of an area last dug in the 1930s. The 8 inch by 14 inch slate bears two inscriptions. The older, upper letters have been broken off and cannot be deciphered. The lower inscription, translated by Charles Thomas of the University of Glasgow, reads "Pater Coliavi ficit Artognov--Artognou, father of a descendant of Coll, has had this built." The inscription is basically in Latin, perhaps with some primitive Irish and British elements, according to Thomas. The British name represented by the Latin Atrognov is Arthnou. Geoffrey Wainwright of English Heritage says that the name is close enough to refer to Arthur, the legendary king and warrior. Thomas, however, believes that we must dismiss ideas that the name is associated with King Arthur. Christopher Morris, professor of archaeology at the University of Glasgow and the director of the excavations, feels that the script does not necessarily refer to Arthur, because King Arthur first entered the historical domain in the twelfth century. “King Arthur Was Real?” by Amelie Walker in Archaelogy Today Direct Quote Paraphrase "Pater Coliavi ficit Artognov--Artognou, father of a descendant of Coll, has had this built." inscription on slate Walker Tintagel: slate w/ 6 th -century writings—near Merlin’s Cave—found in July of 2003 Walker

14 Using Notecards After you have taken all the necessary notes, organize your cards according to your outline. For example, where would a note about Arthur possibly being based on a Welsh chieftain or warlord go? After you have taken all the necessary notes, organize your cards according to your outline. For example, where would a note about Arthur possibly being based on a Welsh chieftain or warlord go? I. Introduction II. Possible sources for the legend III. Geoffrey of Monmouth IV. Arthur in literature V. Conclusion

15 Using Notecards Finally, use a variety of direct quotations, summarized or paraphrased material and original work to construct the paragraphs that will make up your report. Finally, use a variety of direct quotations, summarized or paraphrased material and original work to construct the paragraphs that will make up your report.


Download ppt "Research A Primer. Plagiarism To avoid plagiarism, you must give credit whenever you use To avoid plagiarism, you must give credit whenever you use."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google