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The Life of the Buddha Part – 1. The Life of the Buddha Birth Early years Renunciation After Enlightenment.

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Presentation on theme: "The Life of the Buddha Part – 1. The Life of the Buddha Birth Early years Renunciation After Enlightenment."— Presentation transcript:

1 The Life of the Buddha Part – 1

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3 The Life of the Buddha Birth Early years Renunciation After Enlightenment

4 The Life of the Buddha Birth Early years Renunciation After Enlightenment

5 The Life of the Buddha Birth Early years Renunciation After Enlightenment

6 The Life of the Buddha Birth Early years Renunciation After Enlightenment

7 The Life of the Buddha Birth Early years Renunciation After Enlightenment

8 The Life of the Buddha We should try to discern between : Facts Legends Symbolism This will avoid confusion and allow us to better understand the Buddha and His teachings.

9 The Life of the Buddha We should try to discern between : Facts Legends Symbolism This will avoid confusion and allow us to better understand the Buddha and His teachings.

10 The Life of the Buddha We should try to discern between : Facts Legends Symbolism This will avoid confusion and allow us to better understand the Buddha and His teachings.

11 The Life of the Buddha We should try to discern between : Facts Legends Symbolism This will avoid confusion and allow us to better understand the Buddha and His teachings.

12 The Life of the Buddha We should try to discern between : Facts Legends Symbolism This will avoid confusion and allow us to better understand the Buddha and His teachings.

13 Birth The Buddha means “the Awakened One” or “the Enlightened One”. This is not a name but a term or description of someone who has attained enlightenment – “bodhi”. Siddhattha Gotama : Siddhattha is the personal name and means “wish-fulfilled”. Gotama is the family name.

14 Birth The Buddha means “the Awakened One” or “the Enlightened One”. This is not a name but a term or description of someone who has attained enlightenment – “Bodhi”. Siddhattha Gotama : Siddhattha is the personal name and means “wish-fulfilled”. Gotama is the family name.

15 Birth The Buddha means “the Awakened One” or “the Enlightened One”. This is not a name but a term or description of someone who has attained enlightenment – “Bodhi”. Siddhattha Gotama : Siddhattha is the personal name and means “wish-fulfilled”. Gotama is the family name.

16 Birth The Buddha means “the Awakened One” or “the Enlightened One”. This is not a name but a term or description of someone who has attained enlightenment – “Bodhi”. Siddhattha Gotama : Siddhattha is the personal name and means “wish-fulfilled”. Gotama is the family name.

17 Birth Sakyamuni Buddha : Sakya is the clan name and also the name of the region where the Buddha was born. Muni means sage. Therefore, Sakyamuni means sage of the Sakya clan. Sakyamuni Buddha simply denotes the current Buddha of our age.

18 Birth Sakyamuni Buddha : Sakya is the clan name and also the name of the region where the Buddha was born. Muni means sage. Therefore, Sakyamuni means sage of the Sakya clan. Sakyamuni Buddha simply denotes the current Buddha of our age.

19 Birth Sakyamuni Buddha : Sakya is the clan name and also the name of the region where the Buddha was born. Muni means sage. Therefore, Sakyamuni means sage of the Sakya clan. Sakyamuni Buddha simply denotes the current Buddha of our age.

20 Birth A Bodhisattva is a being who is dedicated to and bound for enlightenment. In Theravada Buddhism, this term is used only for Buddhas before they attain enlightenment. The term Bodhisattva has a different connotation in Mahayana Buddhism where there are many Bodhisattvas, or beings who have postponed enlightenment to help other beings.

21 Birth A Bodhisattva is a being who is dedicated to and bound for enlightenment. In Theravada Buddhism, this term is used only for Buddhas before they attain enlightenment. The term Bodhisattva has a different connotation in Mahayana Buddhism where there are many Bodhisattvas, or beings who have postponed enlightenment to help other beings.

22 Birth Historians are unsure as to the exact date of the birth of Siddhattha Gotama, the Buddha-to-be. Estimates range from 566 BCE to 490 BCE. Siddhattha Gotama was born in Lumbini in the Sakya country, a small protectorate or principality, and raised in the town of Kapilavatthu, both of which are in modern day Nepal.

23 Birth Historians are unsure as to the exact date of the birth of Siddhattha Gotama, the Buddha-to-be. Estimates range from 566 BCE to 490 BCE. Siddhattha Gotama was born in Lumbini in the Sakya country, a small protectorate or principality, and raised in the town of Kapilavatthu, both of which are in modern day Nepal.

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30 Birth His father was King Suddhodana, the chief of the Sakya clan and His mother was Queen Maha Maya. They were childless for a long time. On the night Siddhattha was conceived, the Queen dreamt that a white elephant with six white tusks entered her right side, and ten months later the Bodhisattva was born.

31 Birth His father was King Suddhodana, the chief of the Sakya clan and His mother was Queen Maha Maya. They were childless for a long time. On the night Siddhattha was conceived, the Queen dreamt that a white elephant with six white tusks entered her right side, and ten months later the Bodhisattva was born.

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33 Birth When Queen Maya became pregnant, she left Kapilavatthu for her father's kingdom to give birth. However, she gave birth on the way, at Lumbini. According to tradition, she gave birth while standing up, with the infant emerging from the side of her body. She died soon after and the infant was looked after by her sister, Maha Pajapati, who was also married to the King.

34 Birth When Queen Maya became pregnant, she left Kapilavatthu for her father's kingdom to give birth. However, she gave birth on the way, at Lumbini. According to tradition, she gave birth while standing up, with the infant emerging from the side of her body. She died soon after and the infant was looked after by her sister, Maha Pajapati, who was also married to the King.

35 Birth When Queen Maya became pregnant, she left Kapilavatthu for her father's kingdom to give birth. However, she gave birth on the way, at Lumbini. According to tradition, she gave birth while standing up, with the infant emerging from the side of her body. She died soon after and the infant was looked after by her sister, Maha Pajapati, who was also married to the King.

36 Birth The infant then started to walk taking seven steps, with a lotus appearing at his feet with each step, and declared that this is His last birth. This is likely a later addition to the story, but may be taken symbolically to mean that the Bodhisattva had already successfully cultivated the 7 Factors of Enlightenment in His past lives.

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38 Symbolism An example is the Mahayana Goddess of Mercy : Kuan Yin. Eleven heads symbolizes the ability to hear the cries of suffering beings. Thousand arms symbolizes the ability to come to the aid of many.

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41 Symbolism An example is the Mahayana Goddess of Mercy : Kuan Yin. Eleven heads symbolizes the ability to hear the cries of suffering beings. Thousand arms symbolizes the ability to come to the aid of many.

42 Symbolism An example is the Mahayana Goddess of Mercy : Kuan Yin. Eleven heads symbolizes the ability to hear the cries of suffering beings. Thousand arms symbolizes the ability to come to the aid of many.

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46 Birth The infant then started to walk taking seven steps, with a lotus appearing at his feet with each step, and declared that this is His last birth. This is likely a later addition to the story, but may be taken symbolically to mean that the Bodhisattva had already successfully cultivated the 7 Factors of Enlightenment in His past lives.

47 Birth During the birth celebrations, Asita a highly attained ascetic, visited the palace and was the first to predict that the infant would be a great spiritual teacher. On the 5th day after the birth, 8 renowned holy men were invited to the naming ceremony. On examining the infant, 7 predicted that he would be either a world monarch or a Buddha. Only 1 of them declared that he would be a Buddha only.

48 Birth During the birth celebrations, Asita a highly attained ascetic, visited the palace and was the first to predict that the infant would be a great spiritual teacher. On the 5th day after the birth, 8 renowned holy men were invited to the naming ceremony. On examining the infant, 7 predicted that he would be either a world monarch or a Buddha. Only 1 of them declared that he would be a Buddha only.

49 Early Years King Suddhodana wanted his son to be a universal monarch instead of a Buddha. He thus shielded him from the realities of life by building him 3 palaces, one for the hot season, one for the cold season and one for the rainy season. The Bodhisattva married his cousin, Princess Yasodhara, at the age of 16, and led a luxurious life in his 3 palaces.

50 Early Years King Suddhodana wanted his son to be a universal monarch instead of a Buddha. He thus shielded him from the realities of life by building him 3 palaces, one for the hot season, one for the cold season and one for the rainy season. The Bodhisattva married his cousin, Princess Yasodhara, at the age of 16, and led a luxurious life in his 3 palaces.

51 Early Years King Suddhodana wanted his son to be a universal monarch instead of a Buddha. He thus shielded him from the realities of life by building him 3 palaces, one for the hot season, one for the cold season and one for the rainy season. The Bodhisattva married his cousin, Princess Yasodhara, at the age of 16, and led a luxurious life in his 3 palaces.

52 Early Years According to legend, no old or sick people were allowed to be seen by the Prince. Even dead leaves fallen from trees had to be quickly removed so that he would not see them. This is because the King was afraid that seeing the harsh realities of life and death would cause him to renounce the world and take the spiritual path.

53 Early Years According to legend, no old or sick people were allowed to be seen by the Prince. Even dead leaves fallen from trees had to be quickly removed so that he would not see them. This is because the King was afraid that seeing the harsh realities of life and death would cause him to renounce the world and take the spiritual path.

54 Early Years But despite the best efforts of his father to keep away the sick, old and dying, the Prince was shown these sights by the Devas when he visited the town. The Prince subsequently renounced and left the palace in the dead of the night with his horse and charioteer, with the Devas suppressing all the noise so that no one would be awakened.

55 Early Years But despite the best efforts of his father to keep away the sick, old and dying, the Prince was shown these sights by the Devas when he visited the town. The Prince subsequently renounced and left the palace in the dead of the night with his horse and charioteer, with the Devas suppressing all the noise so that no one would be awakened.

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57 Early Years However, it more likely that the Prince realized these truths by himself and began to contemplate them on his own. This was an age where leaving home on spiritual quests was an established part of Indian culture (Brahmins/Sramanas). Therefore, the Prince renouncing was painful to his family, but not uncommon.

58 Early Years However, it more likely that the Prince realized these truths by himself and began to contemplate them on his own. This was an age where leaving home on spiritual quests was an established part of Indian culture (Brahmins/Sramanas). Therefore, the Prince renouncing was painful to his family, but not uncommon.

59 Early Years However, it more likely that the Prince realized these truths by himself and began to contemplate them on his own. This was an age where leaving home on spiritual quests was an established part of Indian culture (Brahmins/Sramanas). Therefore, the Prince renouncing was painful to his family, but not uncommon.

60 Early Years Ariyapariyesana Sutta MN. 26 "So, at a later time, while still young, a black- haired young man endowed with the blessings of youth in the first stage of life; and while my parents, unwilling, were crying with tears streaming down their faces; I shaved off my hair & beard, put on the ochre robe and went forth from the home life into homelessness.”

61 Early Years Ariyapariyesana Sutta MN. 26 "So, at a later time, while still young, a black- haired young man endowed with the blessings of youth in the first stage of life; and while my parents, unwilling, were crying with tears streaming down their faces; I shaved off my hair & beard, put on the ochre robe and went forth from the home life into homelessness.”

62 Early Years Ariyapariyesana Sutta MN. 26 "So, at a later time, while still young, a black- haired young man endowed with the blessings of youth in the first stage of life; and while my parents, unwilling, were crying with tears streaming down their faces; I shaved off my hair & beard, put on the ochre robe and went forth from the home life into homelessness.”

63 Early Years Ariyapariyesana Sutta MN. 26 "So, at a later time, while still young, a black- haired young man endowed with the blessings of youth in the first stage of life; and while my parents, unwilling, were crying with tears streaming down their faces; I shaved off my hair & beard, put on the ochre robe and went forth from the home life into homelessness.”

64 Early Years Leaving his wife and infant son, Rahula, the Prince then began a life of spiritual wandering to seek the truths of existence and the way out of suffering from the endless rounds of existence, Samsara. In effect, he became one the Sramanas, the wandering ascetics or spiritual seekers, common in ancient India during that period of time.

65 Early Years Leaving his wife and infant son, Rahula, the Prince then began a life of spiritual wandering to seek the truths of existence and the way out of suffering from the endless rounds of existence, Samsara. In effect, he became one the Sramanas, the wandering ascetics or spiritual seekers, common in ancient India during that period of time.

66 Prepared by T Y Lee


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