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The 2005 Maine Coon Seminar Organised by the Maine Coon Breed Advisory Committee.

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Presentation on theme: "The 2005 Maine Coon Seminar Organised by the Maine Coon Breed Advisory Committee."— Presentation transcript:

1 The 2005 Maine Coon Seminar Organised by the Maine Coon Breed Advisory Committee

2 This presentation is based on an original photo seminar which has been used successfully in both TICA and CFA, as well as in other organisations worldwide. This presentation is based on an original photo seminar which has been used successfully in both TICA and CFA, as well as in other organisations worldwide. CFA or TICA Standards have been replaced by the GCCF but comments and photos are relevant to all associations catering for Maine Coons. CFA or TICA Standards have been replaced by the GCCF but comments and photos are relevant to all associations catering for Maine Coons.

3 Coonsboro Calvin Coonidge (at 9 months) (at 9 months) Born October 1991 Born October 1991 The first Maine Coon one show Grand Champion in both CFA and TICA The first Maine Coon one show Grand Champion in both CFA and TICA B/O: Jill & Dave Burrows B/O: Jill & Dave Burrows

4 Original Seminar Prepared by: Beth Hicks, January 2004 Beth Hicks, January 2004 TICA Judge since 1979 TICA Judge since 1979 TICA Instructor – School & Ring TICA Instructor – School & Ring Tanstaafl Cattery – Est Tanstaafl Cattery – Est. 1972

5 A quote from the original author… This photographic seminar on the Maine Coon would not have been possible without the fantastic support received from Maine Coon breeders worldwide. The cats pictured in these pages are from the United States, Europe, Canada, South Africa, Australia, and New Zealand. These Maine Coons are beloved pets, breeding cats, and award winners that have been shown in many different associations around the world. This photographic seminar on the Maine Coon would not have been possible without the fantastic support received from Maine Coon breeders worldwide. The cats pictured in these pages are from the United States, Europe, Canada, South Africa, Australia, and New Zealand. These Maine Coons are beloved pets, breeding cats, and award winners that have been shown in many different associations around the world.

6 After more than thirty years of breeding, I still find that the community of Maine Coon breeders and fanciers is a very special group of people. After more than thirty years of breeding, I still find that the community of Maine Coon breeders and fanciers is a very special group of people. The response to my frequent requests for photos to illustrate specific features was fabulous! The response to my frequent requests for photos to illustrate specific features was fabulous! This started as a project to develop a photo seminar for TICA judges but quickly became much more than that. This started as a project to develop a photo seminar for TICA judges but quickly became much more than that. Maine Coon breeders, owners, and clubs worldwide have my permission to use this seminar as a teaching and training tool. Maine Coon breeders, owners, and clubs worldwide have my permission to use this seminar as a teaching and training tool.

7 Copyrights in the photographs contained in this document belong to their photographer, including without restriction Chanan, Jim Childs, Carmelynn Cole, Jim Brown, Feline Fotos by Helmi, and all other photographers (professional or otherwise). No photograph used in the photo seminar is to be used for any other purpose without the express written permission of the photographer. Copyrights in the photographs contained in this document belong to their photographer, including without restriction Chanan, Jim Childs, Carmelynn Cole, Jim Brown, Feline Fotos by Helmi, and all other photographers (professional or otherwise). No photograph used in the photo seminar is to be used for any other purpose without the express written permission of the photographer. The original seminar can be found on the web at The original seminar can be found on the web at

8 MAINE COON SEMINAR - GCCF Standard

9 HEAD SHAPE (per GCCF standard –35 points, includes shape, size and ear set; shape, size, set and colour of eyes; nose length and profile; cheeks, muzzle and chin) “Medium in length, the nasal bridge being equidistant from the ear line and the tip of the nose, with the width being slightly less than the length of the head. Allowance should be made for additional breadth or jowls in mature males.” “Medium in length, the nasal bridge being equidistant from the ear line and the tip of the nose, with the width being slightly less than the length of the head. Allowance should be made for additional breadth or jowls in mature males.”

10 Maine Coons with different looks shown in different associations worldwide - all lovely cats that fit the standard.

11

12 THE MUZZLE “The muzzle should be square with firm chin.” The muzzle/chin is visibly square, medium in length and blunt ended when viewed in profile. It may give the appearance of being a rectangle but should not appear to be tapering or pointed.” The muzzle/chin is visibly square, medium in length and blunt ended when viewed in profile. It may give the appearance of being a rectangle but should not appear to be tapering or pointed.” “Length and width of the muzzle should be proportionate to the rest of the head and present a pleasant, balanced appearance.” “Length and width of the muzzle should be proportionate to the rest of the head and present a pleasant, balanced appearance.”

13 Prominent Whisker Pads - detract from squareness of muzzle and strength of chin

14 Triangular Snippy & Narrow

15 Short Muzzle Rounded

16 This young girl has a good square muzzle but her head is narrow across the eyes and cheeks, making her look long in the face. The head will broaden as she matures

17 Square muzzles. White on the face can be visually distracting, look for actual shape.

18 THE CHIN “chin, upper lip and nose leather should fall in a perpendicular line. Bite level.” Three chins with the width and depth to complete the square look of the muzzle, also in line with the upper lip.

19 “A chin lacking in depth, i.e. one that tapers from the jaw line to the lip, is not considered strong, firm or desirable.” Chin - Lacks depth Chin - Receding

20 “The chin should be strong, firm, and in line with upper lip and nose. When viewed in profile the chin depth should be observable and give the impression of a square, 90 degree angle.” The female’s chin (left) needs to be stronger and have more depth. The male’s chin (right) has the depth to look balanced with the muzzle.

21 The female’s chin (left) is strong and deep but a little narrow. Male’s chin (right) is receding and needs more depth.

22 THE PROFILE “Nose of uniform width with shallow concave curve at the nasal bridge when viewed in profile, and without a sharp break or stop.” “Nose of uniform width with shallow concave curve at the nasal bridge when viewed in profile, and without a sharp break or stop.” Withhold Certificates or First Prizes in Kitten Open Classes for: Definite nose break or stop Definite nose break or stop Straight profile or pronounced nose bump Straight profile or pronounced nose bump

23 “A profile that is straight from the brow line to the tip of the nose is not acceptable, nor should the profile show signs of having a break or stop.” “The profile should be proportionate to the overall length of the head and should exhibit a slight concavity when viewed in profile. The profile should be relatively smooth and free of pronounced bumps and/or humps.”

24 Straight

25 Suggestion of a Roman Nose Pronounced Nose Bump

26 Unusual Nose BumpSlight Nose Bump

27 Three perfect profiles

28 THE EARS “Large, tall ears, wide at base and tapering to appear pointed at the tip; set high but well apart.”

29 Same female pictured at 8 months and 5 years old

30 One year old neuter – the head doesn’t widen as it does with an entire male.

31 Comment: Age plays a factor in position of ears on head! On kittens and younger adults (particularly females) the ears will often be set more closely together. A whole male’s heads will broaden with age and ears may appear smaller and set further apart. “Set: approximately one ear’s width apart at the base; not flared.“

32 Pictures of the Same Male at ages 7 months, 2 years and 12 years – Ear size did not change! The head broadened Comment: Adult males, as they mature, will get broader across the top of the head causing the ear set to look wider, but the ears at attention should never flare or point outward.

33 Ears less than perfect: Set straight up and narrow

34 Ear bases are too narrow

35 Set too low

36 Out of balance - so tall that ears are the first thing you notice!

37 Ear Flare Ear flare is largely determined by the relationship between the set of the inner and outer base of the ear. If the outer base is set way back from the inner base, the ears will be flared out.

38 Nice size and set but tilted and flared

39 Two whole males: one on left is 6 years old, one on right is 5 years old. Ears that are set correctly should not “go south”.

40 Too small & too wide set

41 Good ears on a 3 year old female

42 Same boy pictured at 6 months and one year - you can see the difference in width of head, but size and set of ears is still good.

43 Lynx Tips add dramatically to the MC look! Pictures of the same female against different backgrounds - see how the visible lynx tips properly finish the pointed shape of the ear.

44 Adult Male with excellent set and size - Well balanced ears

45 THE EYES “Full and round, spaced wide apart with a slightly oblique aperture and set.” Too Slanted Too Round

46 SmallAlmond Shaped

47 Flat toppedToo Wide-Set

48 Three cats with good eye set, size and aperture.

49 BODY (Per GCCF Standard – 30 points: Including shape and proportions; size, bone structure, muscularity and condition, height and thickness of legs; shape and size of paws; shape and length of tail) (Per GCCF Standard – 30 points: Including shape and proportions; size, bone structure, muscularity and condition, height and thickness of legs; shape and size of paws; shape and length of tail) Withhold Certificates or First Prizes in Kitten Open Classes for: Cobby body shape and/or fine bone structure Withhold Certificates or First Prizes in Kitten Open Classes for: Cobby body shape and/or fine bone structure

50 Legs and Feet “Substantial legs with large round paws; toes carried close, five in front, four behind”

51 Withhold Certificates or First Prizes in Kitten Open Classes for: Untufted paws - Not a problem for this cat!

52 Legs should not be overly long or short - the appearance from the side when the cat is standing naturally should be a perfect rectangle with the body positioned evenly over the legs.

53 Comment: Imagine a shoebox sitting on top of another shoebox and you have the proportional shape of the Maine Coon body as it sits over the legs - the legs shouldn’t be so long as to make the body look short, nor should the body be so long as to make the back appear unsupported. Full belly ruff will make legs look shorter.

54 Neck “Neck moderately long; particularly thick and muscular in mature males.” “Neck moderately long; particularly thick and muscular in mature males.” “Body large to medium size, solid and muscular with breadth of chest. Long body with proportionate limbs to create the characteristic rectangular appearance; square rump.” Body

55 BODY (SIZE) “Body Shape: Muscular, broad-chested. Muscular, broad-chested. Size medium to large. Females generally are smaller than males. Size medium to large. Females generally are smaller than males. The body should be long with all parts in proportion to create a well balanced rectangular appearance with no part of the anatomy being so exaggerated as to foster weakness. The body should be long with all parts in proportion to create a well balanced rectangular appearance with no part of the anatomy being so exaggerated as to foster weakness. Allowance should be made for slow maturation.” Allowance should be made for slow maturation.”

56 The GCCF Standard states “Since the Maine Coon is slow to mature (taking up to 4 years), allowance should be made as to their size when judging younger cats. The balance of the cat is of uppermost importance.”

57 On the left is a SIX MONTH old male who already weighs 14 pounds. Next to him is his TWO YEAR old dam who weighs 11 pounds - that is not a small female, but in another six months she will look “small” sitting next to her son.

58 Littermates at one year - two males and one female.

59 Littermates at 11 months. This is a big female (right) but notice the difference in body build and boning in the leg.

60 “Quality should never be sacrificed for size.” Comment: The size difference between males and females is more significant in Maine Coons than any other breed. Males average pounds. Females average 9-12 pounds.

61 TAIL Long, at least the length of the back, wide at the base and tapering towards the tip. Long, at least the length of the back, wide at the base and tapering towards the tip.

62 COAT “Per GCCF Standard – 20 points: including length and texture; frontal ruff; ear feathering and tufting; tail furnishings; paw furnishings” “Per GCCF Standard – 20 points: including length and texture; frontal ruff; ear feathering and tufting; tail furnishings; paw furnishings” “Waterproof and virtually self-maintaining, consisting of an undercoat covered by a more substantial glossy topcoat. Fur shorter on the head, neck and shoulders increasing in length down the back, flanks and tail. A fluffy appearance is undesirable. “Waterproof and virtually self-maintaining, consisting of an undercoat covered by a more substantial glossy topcoat. Fur shorter on the head, neck and shoulders increasing in length down the back, flanks and tail. A fluffy appearance is undesirable.

63 Breeches and belly fur full and shaggy. Frontal ruff beginning at the base of the ears; heavier in males than females. Tail fur long, profuse and flowing; not bushy. Ears feathered and preferably tufted at the tips; the ear feathering should extend beyond the outer edges of the ear. Paws tufted, with long tufts emanating from under the paws, extending backwards to create a snowshoe effect. Breeches and belly fur full and shaggy. Frontal ruff beginning at the base of the ears; heavier in males than females. Tail fur long, profuse and flowing; not bushy. Ears feathered and preferably tufted at the tips; the ear feathering should extend beyond the outer edges of the ear. Paws tufted, with long tufts emanating from under the paws, extending backwards to create a snowshoe effect. Withhold Certificates or First Prizes in Kitten Open Classes for: Overall even coat length or Persian like coat texture Withhold Certificates or First Prizes in Kitten Open Classes for: Overall even coat length or Persian like coat texture

64 Comment: Age and hormonal status can impact development of coat - Many cats ‘blow’ coat at sexual maturity and may be 2 or 3 years old before coat comes back in fully. Age and hormonal status can impact development of coat - Many cats ‘blow’ coat at sexual maturity and may be 2 or 3 years old before coat comes back in fully. Neuters may have fuller coat than entire cats. Neuters may have fuller coat than entire cats.

65 Two similar looking girls illustrate the difference a slight frontal ruff makes in appearance. Age is a factor, as the girl on the right is now 2 years old and her ruff is just starting to grow.

66 Two breeding males approximately the same age Slightly more undercoat adds to shaggy appearance and overall balanced look of this boy Coat lies too close to the body - this boy needs more undercoat, belly shag and ruff

67 Maine Coons with wonderful shaggy coats, frontal ruffs and long flowing tails!

68

69

70 COLOUR (per GCCF standard - 15 points) The Maine Coon is recognised in a variety of solid colours (including white in all eye colours); tortoiseshell; tabby colours (classic and mackerel patterns) with or without silver; shaded and smoke colours; bi-colour and parti-colour (e.g. solid/tabby/tortoiseshell/shaded/smoke colour and white). The Maine Coon is recognised in a variety of solid colours (including white in all eye colours); tortoiseshell; tabby colours (classic and mackerel patterns) with or without silver; shaded and smoke colours; bi-colour and parti-colour (e.g. solid/tabby/tortoiseshell/shaded/smoke colour and white). Chocolate, Lilac and Siamese Points are not allowed. Chocolate, Lilac and Siamese Points are not allowed.

71 Withhold all awards for: 1.Wrongly registered adults, kittens or neuters. NOTE: These should be marked as wrong colour on judge's slips and disqualified. NOTE: These should be marked as wrong colour on judge's slips and disqualified. 2.Blue or odd eyes in cats of a colour other than white 3.Van Patterned Cats

72 Withhold Certificates or First Prizes in Kitten Open Classes for: Bi-Colour or Parti-colour cats that do not exhibit some white on all four paws, belly and chest Bi-Colour or Parti-colour cats that do not exhibit some white on all four paws, belly and chest White markings (including buttons, lockets or spots) anywhere other than those referred to in the SOP White markings (including buttons, lockets or spots) anywhere other than those referred to in the SOP Serious colour or pattern faults Serious colour or pattern faults

73 Faults 1.Unsound base coat in Solid or Tortoiseshell coloured cats 2.Tabby markings in adult Smoke coloured cats 3.Heavy tabby markings in Shaded coloured cats 4.White extending beyond the throat in Non-Silver Tabby cats registered without white 5.Tarnishing in Silver Series cats 6. Heavily brindled coat in Tabby cats

74 Comment: Colour is very subjective, involving elements of clarity and density.

75 Tongue (per GCCF standard - no points are awarded for tongue -) Long enough to clean the nose... Long enough to clean the nose...

76

77 Hope you enjoyed our show!

78 We would like to say a special thank you to Beth Hicks of the Tanstaafl Cattery for allowing us to use her work in our seminar today. Trivia Quiz… Trivia Quiz… Tanstaafl was one of the founder Maine Coon catteries in the USA, but did you know where the word Tanstaafl comes from? Tanstaafl was one of the founder Maine Coon catteries in the USA, but did you know where the word Tanstaafl comes from? There There Ain’t Ain’t No No Such Such Thing Thing As As A Free Free Lunch!! Lunch!!

79 Thank You!


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