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Team A Tracie Greer Yisi Lin Greg Quagliara Sourjya Sinha Roy.

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Presentation on theme: "Team A Tracie Greer Yisi Lin Greg Quagliara Sourjya Sinha Roy."— Presentation transcript:

1 Team A Tracie Greer Yisi Lin Greg Quagliara Sourjya Sinha Roy

2 Image used for education purposes: Target User: College students who track their body data

3 People use body data for different goals (exercise, motivation, new gadget, health, tracking...) People use body data for different goals (exercise, motivation, new gadget, health, tracking…) Predisposition

4 People use body data for different goals (exercise, motivation, new gadget, health, tracking…) Predisposition

5 7 out of 10 people self track regularly Newsweek

6 Number Syndrome: His body data is a score, pass or fail Insight Total Steps today: 1000

7 Number Syndrome: His body data is a score, pass or fail Insight Mon Tue Wed

8 Tracking can cause guilt, negative thoughts and feelings Primary Research 

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11 Kinect sensors can capture and track the motion Research 1

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20 Gary Wolf There are people who believe… “numbers hold secrets that they can’t afford to ignore… … including answers to questions they have not yet thought to ask.”

21 providing a lens to view body data beyond the numbers

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23 When provoked to reflect, people make connections Insight ??!!??

24 How do I define myself?

25 Technical Strategies Device: Kinect Sensors, Projectors

26 Implemented on campus – permanent or traveling exhibit Other: Can be built in museums Future: Mobile app Business Strategies

27 This experience is meant to plant a seed – How do you define yourself? Data? Or something else? Social Strategies

28 Thanks Angelica & Stephanie CJ & Tony Marty IDP 2013 cohort and mentors

29 Questions

30 Predispositions -there is a lot of body data available -people tend to focus on the numbers (number of steps, number of miles run, weight, etc.) -body data very technology-centric -the body is more than the sum of its parts

31 Primary Research -people use body data for different goals (exercise, motivation, new gadget, health, etc.) -tracking can cause guilt, negative thoughts/feelings -body data can be counterproductive -in the beginning it motivates, later it gets ignored -many people are tracking themselves in some form

32 Secondary Research tracking and guilt: “For many self-trackers, the goal is unknown. Although they may take up tracking with a specific question in mind, they continue because they believe their numbers hold secrets that they can’t afford to ignore, including answers to questions they have not yet thought to ask.” (Wolf 2010) “Watch out for those machines, though. Humans know a special trick of self-observation: when to avert our gaze. Machines don’t understand the value of forgiving a lapse, or of treating an unpleasant detail with tactful silence. A graph or a spreadsheet talks only in numbers, but there is a policeman inside all of our heads who is well equipped with punishing words. “Each day my self-worth was tied to the data,” Alexandra Carmichael, one of the founders of the self-tracking site CureTogether, wrote in a heartfelt blog post about why she recently stopped tracking. “One pound heavier this morning? You’re fat. Skipped a day of running? You’re lazy. It felt like being back in school. Less than 100 percent on an exam? You’re dumb.” Carmichael had been tracking 40 different things about herself. The data she was seeing every day didn’t respect her wishes or her self-esteem. It was awful, and she had to stop.” (Wolf 2010)heartfelt blog post “Often, pioneering trackers struggle with feelings of being both aided and tormented by the very systems they have built.” (Wolf 2010) statistics from Pew survey: “And it’s part of a national obsession of a people who, literally, number our days. According to a recent nationwide survey for Pew Research Center Internet & American Life Project, 7 out of 10 people self-track regularly—using everything from human memory to a memory stick—some aspect of health for themselves or for someone else. Among the 3,000 adults questioned, the most popular things to monitor were weight and diet. A third of the people surveyed also track more esoteric elements of their health, from blood pressure to sleep to blood sugar. While many of them keep this information “in their heads,” a full 50 percent actually keep a written record of the data either using technology or on paper. According to the Consumer Electronics Association, in 2012 the U.S. sports and fitness category was a $70 billion business; and earlier this year, market firm ABI released a report that estimated that 485 million wearable computing devices—like smart watches and smart glasses—will be shipped annually by 2018…” (Quart 2013)

33 Secondary Research defamiliarization: Shklovsky outlines a number of devices for achieving the effect of defamiliarization, arguing that “art removes objects from the automatism of perception” [Shklovsky 1917]. De- familiarization, then, is a...device that compels the reader to examine their automated perceptions of that which is so familiar that it seems natural and so unquestionable.” (Bell et al p.151) “Defamiliarization...can be used as a method which calls into question our usual interpretations of everyday objects.” (Bell et al p.154) “Defamiliarization is explicitly not a scientific method; it does not aim primarily to create a better understanding of actual users—Djajadiningrat et al.[2000].... Rather, it provides a lens to help us see...in a new light.” (Bell et al p.154)

34 Secondary Research Citations Bell, Genevieve et al. “Making by Making Strange: Defamiliarization and the Design of Domestic Technologies.” ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction, Vol. 12,No. 2, June Quart, Alissa. “The Body-Data Craze”. Newsweek. 26 June Web. 2 Dec Q Wolf, Gary. “The Data-Driven Life.” The New York Times. 28 April Web. 2 Dec t.html?pagewanted=all&_r=0

35 Insights -everyone has a unique perspective when it comes to body data -when provoked to reflect, people make connections/realizations (self-awareness) -body data reaches beyond the numbers into expressive, creative realms -visual representations of body data provoke (emotion, thoughtfulness, awareness?) -Everyone has a different goal -people are trying to learn about themselves through body data -it’s look at the person as pieces rather than the whole -many people react to the numbers (data) as a grade, its pass or fail. -even though body data is neutral, people’s perception of body data is not

36 Core Providing a lens to view body data beyond the numbers

37 Appendix A: Interviews Abstract: Asking fitbit, jawbone and other data collecting device users their take on body data and body data collection.

38 Summary The people how use body data, have started using it for several reasons (exercise, self tracking, figuring out how their body works, curiosity,). While some people have found specific exact uses (this is where I will cite examples), most of them agree on the following: When I dont use it, I feel guilty at first and then I start to ignore it over time. Other insights People do not follow through and eventually stop using it. They get unique personal things from it. Some goals satisfied, some not. Can be very helpful (heart condition), or can be overwhelming (what do I do with all this data)

39 Subject 1 What were you trying to accomplish when you decided to start using one of these products? I originally started to use Jawbone, around this May. I did not have health goals, initially, just to experience this new wearable technology. What was the overall experience I got from it. What did you actually get from using it? The most interesting thing about this was when other people wanted to see it. They approach me and ask me about it and then I have to talk about it. It becomes a boundary object for social interaction. Over time I decided to measure my steps and used the alarm feature. It has a nice alert system that works for me. How did it meet your goals or how did it disappoint you? I think reaching the goal steps is fulfilling. If I set myself 10,000 steps and I reach it, there is slight joy. I can also log my work out and see the intensity. It has a subtle way of collecting data so I can see it later when I need to. If I did a good performance for a week, and one day was bad (I did not work out) it makes me feel guilty. but once you become too busy with life, I cannot reach my goals so you just let it go. I just ignore it. “the motivation disappeared”

40 Subject 1 What is your overall feeling towards body data and self tracking? initially I am motivated by tracking. I think it is fancy in the end. I don’t care if mine tracks. It is however better than the gym machines in the way that it tracks my everyday activities and reports based on that. In a sense it is a good incentive. Instead of selling my old one, I am planning on getting a similar brand for a similar influence

41 Subject 2 What were you trying to accomplish when you decided to start using one of these products? I was looking to learn more about myself and see how active and how much I sleep over the course of weeks and months. The goal for me was initially to find out the average time I sleep every night over the course of months. Now after about six months, I know that I have consistently gotten between 7 hours and 7 hours and 20 mins of sleep per night (between hours per month). Now that I know that, I can make that a realistic baseline goal for myself. For me the steps are less important because I’m already motivated to work out regularly, so the steps are nice to see, but not the main reason why I have the tracker. What did you actually get from using it? I have actually gotten a lot of social interaction with friends, family and strangers. The device is definitely a social boundary object (somewhere Jeff Bardzell is smiling for me using that as a reference) because it creates conversation. Everybody wants to know about how it works and thinks it is really cool that it can accurate quantify steps and sleep. The advanced features have been fun to observe like the timing and categorization of workouts (Jawbone Up) and Very active minutes (Fitbit). I find the devices do a good job of passively recording so that if I’m curious, I have access to my body data.

42 Subject 2 How did it meet your goals or how did it disappoint you? Satisfied: Both fitbit and jawbone up are relatively comfortable and fit seamlessly as wearable technology into my daily routine. The devices are relatively accurate and provide helpful feedback that I can use as information to tweak my habits. I like that they can communicate with my iPhone so that I can always check on my progress on the go. I like the cool factor that they have when you talk about them to other people who aren’t familiar with the technology. The setup and syncing of the devices is also very easy. The battery life is good for both, lasting about 7-10 days. Disappointed: The durability of the Jawbone Up is not good (usually breaks within 3-4 months). Both Jawbone and Fitbit are water resistant, not water proof. The social/qualitative feedback aspects of both devices are lacking because most people lose interest in these devices after 3-4 months of wearing them. In other words, great you gave me a bunch of quantitative body data, so what? How is it actually helping me? Both device are relatively fashionable, but they still lack the aesthetic wow factor. The Jawbone Up requires a smartphone, i.e. you can’t just sync to a computer or access statistics on a website.

43 Subject 3 Background: I don't use a device specifically, but I've used apps to track food and exercise. What were you trying to get when you got a fit bit or any other device? I wanted to find a way to stick to some sort of diet (or at least review what I'd eaten and make better decisions) in a way that wasn't really invasive or difficult. Having something as simple as an app on smartphone that had the information there for me was huge -- I always have my phone with me so it's not like I needed to remember to bring a physical journal. The app would remind me to log things if I had forgotten. And probably the best part is access to information -- I don't have to look up the nutritional information of an item because it's already there, and once I've eaten it once it's more easily accessible. Which is huge considering I eat the same things pretty frequently, so it's nice to have a function that's basically saying "remember that meal I had on Friday? I had that again today. All of it." Also the ability to run any kind of report or see the data differently is huge because it makes me think outside the box. what did you actually get out of the device? I think I got exactly what I wanted -- convenience and a pretty solid amount of information. There are still gaps, but it's still huge. The cool thing about it too is that my latest addition (Lose It) kind of makes it a game -- so there's a target calorie intake and every day you're reminded that you're either x amount of calories over budget or under budget. So without thinking too hard, I get an at-a-glance view of how I'm doing.

44 Subject 3 how did it satisfy or disappoint you? Mostly I'm satisfied. Like I said, there are gaps of information or generally wrong information--one item had more than 2x the amount on the label--but without taking it too seriously it's really done a great job. I guess it's really as satisfying as you want to make it. what are your overall feelings towards self tracking? I think it's great to a point -- I'm honestly conflicted as to whether I want it to do more or if I value the ability to do it on my own. On one hand it would be great if there was some device that calculated what I ate as I was eating, but then that'd be borderline creepy. Actually, that's past borderline. But the idea of it is nice--that seamless transition. I just don't want that data being sold elsewhere.

45 Subject 4 What were you trying to get when you got a fit bit or any other device? I was trying to encourage myself to work out more I always want to lose some weight but every time I did it, in the end, I gain weight during study time. It is hard to maintain to keep going to the gym. When school work is busy, I stop going to the gym. what did you actually get out of the device? I At first I used fuelband. I went to the gym more often. But later I got too busy and stopped going. I would initially feel bad, but for fitbit or fuel bad, I feel nothing. I just stop wearing them. how did it satisfy or disappoint you? I use an app called gympact that charges you if you miss the gym and rewards me back when I finish my plan. I feel it works sometime since I really dont want to be charged.

46 Subject 4 what are your overall feelings towards self tracking? I got a lot of data, but I dont know what I can do with it. The only thing that works for me is the progress bar. I can see how much I did and how far my goal is Other than that, I don’t feel other data is working for me. And I keep forgetting to start sleep tracking mode on fitbit. The most important thing is friends. My friend made me go to the gym with him in the morning. I never went to the gym in the morning before.

47 Subject 5 What were you trying to get when you got a fit bit or any other device? what did you actually get out of the device? I At first I used fuelband. I went to the gym more often. But later I got too busy and stopped going. I would initially feel bad, but for fitbit or fuel bad, I feel nothing. I just stop wearing them. how did it satisfy or disappoint you? I use an app called gympact that charges you if you miss the gym and rewards me back when I finish my plan. I feel it works sometime since I really dont want to be charged.

48 Subject 5 what are your overall feelings towards self tracking? I got a lot of data, but I dont know what I can do with it. The only thing that works for me is the progress bar. I can see how much I did and how far my goal is Other than that, I don’t feel other data is working for me. And I keep forgetting to start sleep tracking mode on fitbit. The most important thing is friends. My friend made me go to the gym with him in the morning. I never went to the gym in the morning before.

49 Appendix B: Golden Questions

50 Concept What is at the heart of our design?? WHY? How does this make the user selfaware? What lasting impact will this have on users? What good is one minute of play? How do we visualize movement? Is there guided movement involved in this or is it completely freeform? Can this concept also speak to identity (i.e. campus vs. campus)? What does the user get from this? Is he/she aware of the data? How are they made aware? How are users initially attracted/engaged in using this? How can this be used in unintended and negative ways? How do we make this unpredictable/ambiguous? What is the duration? Why? Where is this located? How is it displayed? Do you enter an enclosed space (shipping container) or is it outdoors? What kind of technology do we need? Cameras? Sensors? Lights? Speakers? Where would this be displayed? On a building?

51 Concept Why don’t adults play? Is this cultural? How do you get reluctant people on board? How do you get people to lose their inhibitions? How do you make people feel comfortable taking a risk/doing something silly? How do you moderate behavior (especially with regard to intercampus rivalry)? Could this technology lead to bullying of participants? How do we get a wider population involved? Could this be employed in other public spaces? Could this concept be used in a workplace setting? Would it be used? Could this be used in the home? What are the monetary costs involved? Who gets left out? What about people with limited mobility? Will people feel better after participating? How will we know? Could movements be tied to something other than music? Light? Pictures? Animal Sounds? Puppets? Could we create human marionettes? Does the screen show the person in the actual environment or someplace else?

52 Concept Are others shown on the screen (other campuses)? Can they communicate in real time? Are there specific gestures we want to use? How does the user know the gestures? What would the cost be for such an installation? Can this be twosided (interactions on both sides)?

53 Location What happens when it gets vandalized? What about weather change? What does the wall do during different seasons? Do people really want to play with a wall in the middle of winter? What about during summer when there are few students left? Would the universities want this on campus? Why? Is this a destination (a place to seek out) or is it a passage (in transit from place to place). Are we trying to make people seek this out? Or do we want people to discover it and possibly return to it? Does it always have to be in the same place? Can it be a traveling piece?

54 Attention What are ways to capture people’s attention? What kind of affordances can we use? What lasts even if you do it once? What about once a month? Once a year? What makes an experience memorable? Why would you come back? Why do people watch a video repeatedly? Or listen to a song over and over again? What quality can we take from these (see above) and apply to our design? Does it change? Does it evolve? If so, how? What keeps peoples interest? How do we keep this fresh? How complicated can it be before it becomes too complicated? How do you get them to participate? Why wouldn’t people participate? What are the reasons

55 User Group Who are they? Why are they coming to interact with this? What scenario are they in? What were they doing before? What are they doing after? How does this affect them?

56 Body data Do we want technologies that measure every movement or technologies that inspire us to move? What does body data really tell us about ourselves? Are we trying to solve problems through awareness of data? i.e. I don’t move enough, so I’ll track my steps. Does this help? How do we put the body (the person) back in body data? In other words, how do we shift the focus from the numbers and the technologies to the people and their bodies? Should the reflection ask the participant rhetorical questions (juxtaposing numbers vs. lived experience)? Will you remember this (data) or this (video of interaction)? Does this (data) = this (experience)? One side of each piece is individual experience/datathe other side can be communal? How does this change over time? involvement of artists, community members, design program, Where? schools,

57 Body data respiration rates height # of interactions with others smiles, frowns, tongues How do we unite the dismembered body parts? What is the consummation of the experience? How do we get people to reflect on body data and what it means? Are you this (numbered/data silhouette) or this (body filled with video of you interacting)? How do people with limited physical abilities interact with this? (i.e. wheelchair bound)


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