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2015 FACET/ILTE Spring Teaching Symposium

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Presentation on theme: "2015 FACET/ILTE Spring Teaching Symposium"— Presentation transcript:

1 2015 FACET/ILTE Spring Teaching Symposium
How to Transition Students From a "Fixed" Mindset to a "Growth" Mindset Dr. Tom Keefe, Participant, IUS Facet Leadership Group April 14, 2017 2015 FACET/ILTE Spring Teaching Symposium

2 Main Content Areas My Students My Story Mindsets The Power of Belief
2015 FACET/ILTE Spring Teaching Symposium April 14, 2017 Main Content Areas My Students My Story Mindsets The Power of Belief Teach a Growth Mindset Group Exercises

3 My Students Most are non-traditional
2015 FACET/ILTE Spring Teaching Symposium April 14, 2017 My Students Most are non-traditional Many lack learning skills of traditional students Many tend to be passive learners Many don’t feel like they belong Suffer from poor performance outcomes. Only about 8% of our students graduate in 4 years. Only about 32% after 8 years Wanted to do something!

4 2015 FACET/ILTE Spring Teaching Symposium
April 14, 2017 My Story Sabbatical: Self-regulated Learning, (theory focused on goal orientation), masters of their own learning Encouraged: metacognitive strategies Skills: time management, planning & organizing, active reading, deliberate practice, use of goals like learning & performance goals With a growth mindset: students believe they can grow and develop their talents. Goal oriented, motivated to learn skills, engaged @ Sabbatical: Self-regulated Learning, (learning theory focused on goal orientation) masters of their own learning Teach: metacognitive strategies – thinking about how you think. Getting students to think about their learning Skills: time management, planning & organizing, active reading, deliberate practice, use of goals like learning & performance goals Role of a growth mindset: a goal directed attitude that accompanies self-regulated learners. With it learners believe that they can grow and develop their talents. With a growth mindset students believe they can grow and develop their talents. Tend to be goal oriented, motivated to learn skills, engaged in their own learning – masters of it. With out a growth mindset students are not motivated. The blow off my attempts to teach them the skills they need. When I have talked with them about it is clear to me they don’t believe they need to learn how to learn. They see themselves as naturals. People have told them they are smart and smart student get the grades because the have the IQ.

5 Mindsets Stanford Professor Carol Dweck defines mindsets this way,
Customize header: View menu/Header and Footer April 14, 2017 Mindsets Stanford Professor Carol Dweck defines mindsets this way, “Mindsets are beliefs—beliefs about yourself and your most basic qualities. Think about your intelligence, your talents, your personality. Are these qualities simply fixed traits, carved in stone and that’s that? Or are they things you can cultivate throughout your life?”

6 2015 FACET/ILTE Spring Teaching Symposium
Fixed Mindset The belief a person has that their basic qualities, such as: ability, intelligence or talent, are fixed traits Success and failure in performance is seen as an attribute of intelligence or talent that is fixed Performance on a test or assignment proves they are smart or dumb at something Thoughts, feelings, and speech about performance is focused on evaluating personal qualities/traits

7 Examples of Fixed Mindset Statements
Customize header: View menu/Header and Footer April 14, 2017 Examples of Fixed Mindset Statements I’m smart. For me school is easy. It’s just common sense. Nice! Looks I got the spelling gene! Some people are just math brains and others aren’t! I guess I’m not! Why disappoint myself and even try. I can’t write!

8 The Brain that Changes Itself
2015 FACET/ILTE Spring Teaching Symposium April 14, 2017 The Brain that Changes Itself Science indicates that the qualities of the brain may not be as fixed once thought Neuroplasticity: throughout life the brain reorganizes itself by forming new neural pathways, helps overcome injuries, learn new information and adapt to changes. Dr. Norman Doidge Neuroplasticity: ability of the brain to reorganize itself by forming new neural pathways throughout a person's life. Neuroplasticity plays a primary role in helping the brain overcome injuries, learn new information and adapt to situational and environmental changes.

9 2015 FACET/ILTE Spring Teaching Symposium
April 14, 2017 Growth mindset A person Believes/Knows that their most basic talents can be developed through dedicated hard work, learning skills, & good choices IQ, brains, talent & innate abilities are just the starting point Performance, ability & intelligence are things that can be improved & developed Success: hard work, learning skills & good choices Tests validate a strategy, choice, or effort Thoughts, feelings & speech focus on the process of learning @

10 Examples of Growth Mindset Statements
2015 FACET/ILTE Spring Teaching Symposium April 14, 2017 Examples of Growth Mindset Statements I love a challenge – its how I get better! I messed up the last test. I will have to think about what I did and regroup. Mistakes are okay. I learn from mistakes. I had a good semester. It took me a while to figure it out, but I came on strong at the end. Hey, that study session really worked. I put in the time and I got the grade.

11 The Power of Belief – Mindset & Success: Eduardo Briceno at TED
2015 FACET/ILTE Spring Teaching Symposium The Power of Belief – Mindset & Success: Eduardo Briceno at TED

12 To Teach a Growth Mindset
2015 FACET/ILTE Spring Teaching Symposium To Teach a Growth Mindset First, listen to how students are saying things Remember to speak back with a growth mindset voice metacognitive skills, a person planning, monitoring, and evaluating personal progress toward goal attainment.[ learning strategies, deliberate practice, use of learning goals, time management skills, and scaffolding

13 “yet!” When a student says, “I can’t ________!” Respond by saying ...
2015 FACET/ILTE Spring Teaching Symposium April 14, 2017 When a student says, “I can’t ________!” Respond by saying ... “yet!” What we say belies what we think and teach our students!

14 Speak with a Growth Mindset:
2015 FACET/ILTE Spring Teaching Symposium April 14, 2017 Speak with a Growth Mindset: Communicate a growth mindset attitude Communicate positive expectations about effort. Winning happens because of work hard, learning the right way to do things, and thorough practice. Focus feedback on the process of learning Recognize student use of a growth mindset

15 Practice a Growth Mindset in Class
2015 FACET/ILTE Spring Teaching Symposium Practice a Growth Mindset in Class Tell students: mistakes & failure are natural, golden opportunities! Signals for change Change to Win. When one way does not work, adapt and innovate Winning is not about “I/Q”, it’s about “your” use of the right strategy, “your” effort, & “your” persistence Expect hard work and practice to be necessary. It’s not just for some. Recognize students: for their use of a growth mindset Teach learning skills not just content Challenge students to be masters of their learning Metacognitive strategies refers to methods used to help students understand the way they learn; in other words, it means processes designed for students to 'think' about their 'thinking'. Put students in control: So very much of the planning organizing and monitoring in education is done by the system and the instructor that students don’t learn to do it for themselves.

16 2015 FACET/ILTE Spring Teaching Symposium
April 14, 2017 Group Exercises Recognizing Fixed and Growth Mindset Statements is the first step Students are asked to develop three (3) growth mindset statements: Business Students – coming example Nursing Students – speaking to a patient Education Majors – speaking to a student Arts and Letters – thinking about your own work Faculty – Feedback on written projects

17 Class Exercise for Business Students
In groups: Select a management job you are familiar with Come up with three (3) growth mindset statements about a subordinate's performance Are you sure they are growth mindset statements? What makes them growth mindset statements? Are they focused on qualities or

18 Class Exercise for Nursing Students @
In groups: Imagine you are talking with a patient Come up with three (3) growth mindset statements that you can use to counsel patients Are you sure they are growth mindset statements? What makes them growth mindset statements? Are they focused on qualities or process?

19 Class Exercise for Education Majors @
In groups: Imaging you are student teaching! Come up with three (3) growth mindset statements about a student’s performance on homework Are you sure they are growth mindset statements? What makes them growth mindset statements? Are they focused on qualities or process?

20 Class Exercise for Arts & Letters @
In groups: Think about how you criticize your own work. Come up with three (3) growth mindset statements about your own work Are you sure they are growth mindset statements? What makes them growth mindset statements? Are they focused on qualities or process?

21 Faculty Exercise: Giving Written Feedback
2015 FACET/ILTE Spring Teaching Symposium April 14, 2017 Faculty Exercise: Giving Written Feedback We should model a growth mindset with our feedback We should Focus feedback on the process of learning Good feedback: Descriptive, Objective, & Timely Research indicates 38% of the time feedback is associated with decreased performance Destructive Feedback is never received well Negative feedback is often not received well. Student is not ready, willing or able to receive the feedback. Doesn’t have the back ground to understand what is being said Emotional at the time Distracted by other things To be effective feedback needs to be given when students are ready, willing, & able to use it. Scaffolding Examples! The student who didn’t actively read. The anxious presenter!

22 Why Doesn’t’ Feedback Always Work?
2015 FACET/ILTE Spring Teaching Symposium April 14, 2017 Why Doesn’t’ Feedback Always Work? Too much negative or destructive feedback Too infrequent Too ambiguous Too much about the person, not about the process – praise not feedback Student’s aren’t ready, willing, or able to use it

23 2015 FACET/ILTE Spring Teaching Symposium
April 14, 2017 Some Feedback Statements Made to IUS Students? (source: IUS, Writing Center) Awk. Did you read this? What? Do you really believe this? I have no idea what you are trying to say. This is a jumbled mess and makes no sense. Did you stay up all night writing this? It sure looks like it. Where did this come from? Is this how you learned to write in high school? What I want you to focus on is what is implied about the person by these statements

24 Helpful Instructor Feedback
2015 FACET/ILTE Spring Teaching Symposium April 14, 2017 Helpful Instructor Feedback Assume good intentions Create expectations & offer recognition of effort Tells students what they did wrong with respect Coach for success by focusing on what they did, or need to do, to be successful . Use specific, practical suggestions Offer suggestions when students are ready, willing, and able to use the feedback

25 Compare these statements (What’s Implied)
2015 FACET/ILTE Spring Teaching Symposium April 14, 2017 Compare these statements (What’s Implied) Your opinions are not objective. Your writing is slanted. You can use your opinions, but you have to use better evidence to support those.

26 We Need to Talk About the Elephant in the Room
2015 FACET/ILTE Spring Teaching Symposium April 14, 2017 We Need to Talk About the Elephant in the Room Good Feedback can be a lot of work, which can take lots of your time! Look at the next few examples….

27 Compare these statements
2015 FACET/ILTE Spring Teaching Symposium April 14, 2017 Compare these statements Did you read this? I know you work hard to write better. Here is a strategy that may help. Put your writing down after you have finished the first time. Come back to it later and read it out loud to see how it sounds.

28 Compare these statements
2015 FACET/ILTE Spring Teaching Symposium April 14, 2017 Compare these statements This is a jumbled mess and makes no sense. I appreciate your hard work. I can see you have written and rewritten this section many times. It still is jumbled and I have a hard time following what you are trying to say. I would like you to go to the writing center. Take your paper. Ask them how you can improve the flow of my writing. Use the word - flow. They will know what you mean and want to help.

29 Compare these statements
2015 FACET/ILTE Spring Teaching Symposium April 14, 2017 Compare these statements Do you really believe this? I know when you write, things seem to make sense. But here is the problem with your statement _________. Here is a strategy that may help. After you are finished, ask someone else to read it to see if everything makes sense.

30 Compare these statements
2015 FACET/ILTE Spring Teaching Symposium April 14, 2017 Compare these statements I have no idea what you are trying to say. I want to help you write better. There is a problem here with how this statement relates to what you are writing about. Here is something I want you to try. After you have written a statement, ask yourself if it is clearly related to the subject of the paragraph.

31 Compare these statements
2015 FACET/ILTE Spring Teaching Symposium April 14, 2017 Compare these statements Where did this come from? Did you stay up all night writing this? It sure looks like it. I can see you are working hard and must have been tired when you wrote this. Here is a suggestion. Look at your schedule and plan ahead. If there is going to be a log jam, shift the work backward to an earlier part of your schedule so you can get it done without being so tired.

32 Suggestions to Make Good Feedback Practical
2015 FACET/ILTE Spring Teaching Symposium April 14, 2017 Suggestions to Make Good Feedback Practical Use rubrics. Canvas is great! Scaffold your feedback. Avoid bombarding students with too much feedback Ask students what feedback they want Cut/paste frequently used feedback statements into electronic submissions Use brief written feedback statements supported by detailed face-to-face feedback Use computerized testing to automate as much of the feedback process as possible – full feedback!

33 In Summary, Helpful Instructor Feedback
2015 FACET/ILTE Spring Teaching Symposium April 14, 2017 In Summary, Helpful Instructor Feedback Assumes good intentions Creates expectations & offers recognition of effort Tells students what they did wrong with respect Coaches for success by focusing on what they did, or need to do, to be successful . Use specific, practical suggestions Offers suggestions when students are ready, willing, and able to use the

34 References “Mindsets” by Dr. Carol Dweck
2015 FACET/ILTE Spring Teaching Symposium April 14, 2017 References “Mindsets” by Dr. Carol Dweck Self-regulated Learning, Dr. Dale Schrunk Neuroplasticity, Dr.Norman Doidge Metacognitive Strategies: Thinking about their thinking Active Reading: Reading with a purpose Deliberate practice, Dr. Anders K Ericsson 1.Learning goals & 2. Performance goals Time management, & Planning skills @

35 Customize header: View menu/Header and Footer
April 14, 2017 The End @

36 Scaffolding, a helpful teaching technique
2015 FACET/ILTE Spring Teaching Symposium April 14, 2017 Scaffolding, a helpful teaching technique Students need many skills in place to be able to advance and learn. Also, many subjects require learning material in sequence Not every student is at the same place at the same time Scaffolding means targeting feedback to bring students to that next level As instructors, we need to know our material and our students

37 Cautions When Using Feedback
2015 FACET/ILTE Spring Teaching Symposium April 14, 2017 Cautions When Using Feedback Desire of recipient for feedback is important. Accurate timely cognitive processing of feedback is much less than a given. Not everyone wants feedback. Not everyone is ready to hear feedback If you are unsure if a student wants feedback ask! You may be surprised how many times they turn you down.

38 Focus on Process in a Positive Way
2015 FACET/ILTE Spring Teaching Symposium April 14, 2017 Focus on Process in a Positive Way Use statements that assume good intentions & recognized effort Tell the truth with respect and compassion Coach for success Encourage students to visualize their success Help students to master thinking and speaking growth mindset Self-monitor personal prejudices and negative non-verbal cues


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