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DOES YOUR 831 (b) CAPTIVE QUACK? Breakout Session 1 (Thursday September 29, 2011) Moderator: Frederick E. Turner, J.D. Speaker: Jay D. Adkisson, J.D. Speaker:

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Presentation on theme: "DOES YOUR 831 (b) CAPTIVE QUACK? Breakout Session 1 (Thursday September 29, 2011) Moderator: Frederick E. Turner, J.D. Speaker: Jay D. Adkisson, J.D. Speaker:"— Presentation transcript:

1 DOES YOUR 831 (b) CAPTIVE QUACK? Breakout Session 1 (Thursday September 29, 2011) Moderator: Frederick E. Turner, J.D. Speaker: Jay D. Adkisson, J.D. Speaker: David J. Slenn, J.D.

2  Tax advantages, treatment and issues  IRS Rulings  Potential problem areas  Captive Taxation Agenda

3 Tax Advantages Deduction of premiums by Insureds Generally, the loss reserves are deductible by a captive which shelters Premium Income to the captive 831(b) election allows Captive with 1.2 million or less Premium Income to elect to be tax exempt from Premium Income

4 831(b) Captive Insurance Companies An insurance company, including a captive, may elect under 28 U.S.C. sec. 831(b) to be taxed on its investment income only, so long as the company receives less than $1.2 million in premium each year. The 831(b) election is filed along with the company's first tax return, and cannot be revoked without the consent of the Secretary of the Treasury. This election is an incentive provided by Congress to encourage the formation of new insurance companies. What 831(b) effectively allows a small insurance company to receive up to $1.2 million per year in premiums, without paying any income taxes on those premiums. The 831(b) election does not affect -- at all -- the deductibility of the premiums paid by the operating business to the captive. So long as those premiums are otherwise deductible, they may be deducted by the operating business just like any premium payments to a captive. This has the effect of creating an up to $1.2 million deduction in the operating business, with the premium moneys transferred to the captive, and with the captive not paying any income taxes on the receipt of those premiums.

5 831(b) Election Alternative Tax Election Statement The named taxpayer herby elects to be subject to tax only on its taxable investment income as computed under IRC Section 834.This taxable income calculation does not include any net operating loss carried from a tax year in which the taxpayer was not taxed as a property and casualty insurance company. The election is made pursuant to IRC Section 831 (b) (2). It applies to the tax year of this return and to all subsequent tax years for which the election requirements are met.

6 Tax Treatment of “Small” Captives 831(b) Captive  If premiums are less than $1.2 Million per year, no tax on premium income  Tax is paid on investment income at corporate rates  C-Corporations do not have the preferential individual capital gains income tax rate, so real estate is a bad investment  High cash value or private placement life insurance may be an appropriate vehicle to defer corporate taxation  Also need to watch out for corporate AMT on death benefit paid to a C-Corporation  Not a panacea, and should only be used as part of an overall plan  CAVEAT: Beware of promoters “selling” captives as a way to buy “tax deductible life insurance”

7 Irrevocable Trust for benefit of clients children Captive Insurance Company Client (s) Operating Business & Entities Shareholder(s) 1.2mm premium 1.2mm deduction  Captive pays NO income tax on 1.2mm of premium income  Wealth Transfer of underwriting profit  Qualified dividend or capital gain to shareholder(s) 831(b) - Simple Example

8 Federal Income Taxation Requirements: Bona-fide Business Purpose Risk Transfer Risk Distribution Operates as an insurance company Reasonable premiums Adequate capitalization

9 Federal Income Taxation What is insurance? Helvering v. Le Gierse, 312 U.S. 531 (1941) Risk Shifting Risk Distribution Uninsurable 80-year-old woman purchased a life policy and an annuity policy from the same insurance company one month before death Executor did not report death benefit on estate tax return Supreme Court found no risk shifted because of offsetting positions; this was just an attempted tax dodge First case to set forth the standard for true insurance as required to have both risk shifting and risk distribution

10 Federal Income Taxation Risk Distribution and Shifting Case law developed two theories.  Theory 1 (Third Party Theory): Sufficient third party premium with related premiums Courts say 30% third-party insurance is adequate  Theory 2 (Balance Sheet Theory): Sufficient related party entities insured to create risk distribution and shifting

11 Federal Income Taxation Risk Distribution Third Party Theory  Courts have ruled that, if the captive writes sufficient unrelated premiums, related business is also deductible.  Courts allowed 30% unrelated premiums (Sears, AMERCO, Harper Group, Ocean Drilling).  Courts never established a floor (Gulf Oil – 2% insufficient).  Rev. Rul. 93-92 for employees benefits seems to recognize employees benefits as third party insurance.

12 Third Party Case The Harper Group, Inc. v. Commissioner (1992) The Harper Group Captive Insurance Co. Captive Insurance Co. Sister Co. Brother Co. 3 rd Parties Insurance Premiums 29% of Premiums

13 Federal Income Taxation Risk Shifting Some History Revenue Ruling 77-316, 1977-2 C.B. 53  Service creates the “economic family doctrine”  Risk must be transferred outside of the economic family to be true insurance  Key focus was on a lack of risk shifting, therefore not insurance and premiums not deductible

14 Federal Income Taxation Risk Shifting More History Revenue Ruling 78-338, 1978-2 C.B. 107  Adequate risk shifting with 31 unrelated companies  This was a group captive, not a pure captive, so this was not terribly helpful to closely held business owners  Service noted that no single member had a controlling interest

15 Federal Income Taxation Risk Shifting More History Court Rejection of Economic Family Doctrine  Carnation Company v. Commissioner, 640 F.2d 1010 (9 th Cir. 1981) (taxpayer loss – largely on other grounds)  Clougherty Packing Co. v. Commissioner, 84 T.C. 948 (T.C. 1985) (taxpayer loss – largely on other grounds)  Humana, Inc. v. Commissioner, 881 F.2d 247 (6th Cir. 1989) (taxpayer victory - mostly) Particularly explicit rejection of economic family doctrine. After a detailed discussion of prior courts rejecting the Service’s theory, the court concluded that “under no circumstances do we adopt the economic family argument advanced by the government.”

16 Federal Income Taxation Risk Shifting Explicit Rejection of Economic Family Doctrine Harper Group v. Commissioner, 979 F.2d 1341 (9th Cir. 1992) (taxpayer victory) Affirmed tax court opinion, which stated, in part: “We have repeatedly rejected respondent's economic family theory.”

17 Federal Income Taxation Risk Shifting The Service won in most cases where the captive insured the parent (still problematic today), but lost in cases where the captive insured affiliates owned by a common parent The taxpayer losses were never on the basis of the economic family doctrine, as the courts consistently refused to apply this bright-line test as too overly inclusive and instead applied a facts & circumstances test

18 Federal Income Taxation Risk Shifting The Balance Sheet Theory  Allows deduction of premiums paid to a brother-sister captive without without unrelated business.  Originally had favorable decisions only in the Sixth Circuit (Humana, Hospital Corporation of America); subsequently expanded to all taxpayers (Kiddie).

19 Balance Sheet Case Humana, Inc. Holding Co. Captive Insurance Co. Brother Co. Sister Co. Insurance Premiums Brother Co. Sister Co. Insurance Premiums Premiums allocated to Parent would not be deductible Humana, Inc. v. Commissioner (1998)

20 Federal Income Taxation Risk Shifting/Distribution Important Issues in Brother-Sister Structures  Brother-sister risk is not unrelated risk for purposes of insulating parent risk. Will not provide a deduction for parent's premiums.  How many brother-sister insureds do you need?  Is the correct measure the number of insureds or number of risks?

21 Federal Income Taxation as an Insurance Company Revenue Ruling 2001-31, 2001-1 C.B. 1348  Service determines it will no longer raise the economic family theory Explicitly acknowledged that no court had fully adopted the economic family theory set forth in Rev. Rul. 77-31  Analysis is now a case-by-case analysis  Service promised more challenges based on facts and circumstances  Focus is on risk shifting, risk distribution, inadequate capitalization, and parental guarantees

22 Other Significant IRS Rulings  Rev. Rul. 2002-89 – Third Party Risk  Rev. Rul. 2002-90 – Balance Sheet Theory  Rev. Rul. 2005-40 – Disregarded Entities and More  Rev. Rul. 2008-8 – Cell Captive  Rev. Rul. 2009-26 – Reinsurance and Risk Distribution

23 Safe Harbor Rulings  Rev Rul. 2002-89 – Third Party Risk  Rev Rul. 2002-90 – Balance Sheet Theory  Rev Rul. 2005-40 – Disregarded Entities and More

24 Third Party Revenue Ruling Rev. Rul. 2002-89 - ruled on deductibility of parent's premiums where captive had 10% unrelated business (unfavorable ruling) and 50% unrelated business (favorable ruling).  Note Harper’s 30% decision is in the middle.  Gulf Case – 2% third party business was insufficient.  Unrelated premium percentage was determined on both gross and net basis; gross should not be relevant.  Requirement for homogeneous risks does not make sense from an actuarial approach or from case law.  Captive was licensed in multiple U.S. States; captives are traditionally not licensed in multiple U.S. States.  The risks were from different States.  Risk must be spread.

25 Balance Sheet Revenue Ruling Rev. Rul. 2002-90 - ruled on premiums paid by sister companies to a captive owned by their parent, with 12 subsidiaries, none with more than 15% or less than 5% of The Total Risk insured on a net and gross basis  Postulates 12 fairly equal-sized subsidiaries.  Note none less than 5% requirement.  Requires that risks be homogeneous.  Requires that risks be from different States.  Requires that captive be licensed in all 12 States

26 Disregarded Entities Ruling Treatment of disregarded entities (i.e., LLC’s) – Rev. Rul. 2005-40 says they are disregarded, risk of a single member LLC is risk of the parent Inconsistent with the Balance Sheet theory. Inconsistent with treatment IRS wants for partnerships. Single member LLC’s are respected by the IRS in other contexts. Section 965 repatriation of profits; separate entities for liability for taxes. Most importantly, disregarded entities are respected for liability and legal purposes, and that is what is being transferred in insurance transactions. They have separate balance sheets

27 Relationship between Insured and Captive Owner Ruling Rev.Rul. 2005-40 says that, even if the insurer is adequately capitalized and completely unrelated, if there are an insufficient number of insureds, you may not have risk distribution, and thus no insurance. If not insurance, what is it? - Insured has paid an adequately capitalized, unrelated entity for goods or services What is the rationale? - If an insurer insures 10,000 buildings in 500 cities against fire, does the law of large numbers work differently, from the insurer's perspective, if one entity owns them all?  12 or more insured can ensure risk distribution  Related parties that are separate taxpayers are considered separate premium payers  50% third party risk is adequate

28 Other IRS Guidance  TAM 200816029Service will not count limited partnerships with a common general partner as separate entities No logic to the Service’s argument that the common general partner bears all risk of loss  Rev Rul 2008-8 Protected Cell Captives - Service requires risk distribution within each cell, not just within the overall organization, as cells are segregated from each other for liability purposes  Rev. Rul. 2009-26 - To Determine risk distribution regarding a reinsurance contract one must look through to the risks of the ultimate insured – The Primary (underlying) Insurance Contract

29 Potential Problem Areas  Thinly capitalized  Related party loan-backs  Investment in life insurance Can be a signal to the Service that this was a sham transaction/lacking in economic substance Let the captive mature before buying life insurance, and be sure there is a substantial, nontax purpose (estate planning/buy-sell purpose may be helpful) Service has issued summonses for Aviva Life, AmerUs (now Aviva), and Indianapolis Life (now Aviva) related to ongoing scrutiny of captive promoters maintaining alliances with life insurance companies  Inadequate third party risk Less than 12 insureds Risk pools that pay no claims Protected cell companies (Rev. Rul. 2008-8)  Heavy investment in the activities of affiliate companies (Service could use this as evidence in a sham transaction)  Heavy investment in illiquid assets (not “acting like” an insurance company)

30 Potential Problem Areas  Accessing captives through any sort of “alliance”, “institute” or other title used to notate a consortium of individuals banded together to sell tons of life insurance through the aggressive marketing and inappropriate use of tax-advantaged structures  This is a sure way to get a target painted on your back or your client’s back No attorney-client privilege The Service can and does get customer lists from these groups These groups tend to be more reckless in their marketing materials since they need the “sizzle” to attract the attention of life insurance producers The Service can and does use reckless marketing materials to hang taxpayers  Such as materials marketing captives as a way to deduct life insurance premiums and never pay tax on the proceeds  Like any advanced planning tool, captives should be accessed through an attorney as part of a comprehensive approach in arranging a client’s affairs Attorney-client privilege will apply

31 Do It Right Like any advanced planning tool, captives should be accessed through an attorney as part of a comprehensive approach in arranging a client’s affairs

32 Captive Family / Irrevocable Trust Shareholder Phantom Capitalization of the Phantom Capitalization of a Captive Operating Companies $ 1,000,000 Property & Casualty Premiums paid to Captive $30,000 initial Capital Contribution Domicile regulations provide that underwriting profits within 90 days of formation are added to capital.

33 Captive Improper Formation AnalI Improper Formation Analysis for a Captive No feasibility study No Audits No Actuarial studies Business risks

34 Captive Taxation – Getting to Captive Taxation – Getting to Section 831 o Section 831

35 Captive Taxation – Captive Taxation – Subchapter L L

36 §831 Tax on insurance companies other than life insurance companies (a)General rule - Taxes computed as provided in section 11 shall be imposed for each taxable year on the taxable income of every insurance company other than a life insurance company. [---Go to §832 for definition of insurance company taxable income, which includes investment income, underwriting income, gain, etc---].

37 § 832 Insurance company taxable income (What we are skipping – non §831(b) taxation) (a)Definition of taxable income (b)Definitions In the case of an insurance company subject to the tax imposed by section 831—831 (1) Gross income The term “gross income” means the sum of— (A) The combined gross amount earned during the taxable year, from investment income and from underwriting income

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39 §831 Tax on insurance companies other than life insurance companies (b) Alternative tax for certain small companies (1) In general In lieu of the tax otherwise applicable under subsection (a), there is hereby imposed for each taxable year on the income of every insurance company to which this subsection applies a tax computed by multiplying the **taxable investment income** of such company for such taxable year by the rates provided in section 11 (b).

40 §831 Tax on insurance companies other than life insurance companies (2) Companies to which this subsection applies (A) In general This subsection shall apply to every insurance company other than life …. if— (i)the net written premiums (or, if greater, direct written premiums) for the taxable year do not exceed $1,200,000, and (ii) such company elects the application of this subsection for such taxable year.

41 §831 Tax on insurance companies other than life insurance companies (2) Companies to which this subsection applies (A) In general The election under clause (ii) shall apply to the taxable year for which made and for all subsequent taxable years for which the requirements of clause (i) are met. Such an election, once made, may be revoked only with the consent of the Secretary.

42 §834 Determination of taxable investment income (a) General rule For purposes of section 831 (b), the term “taxable investment income” means the gross investment income, minus the deductions provided in subsection (c).831 (b)

43 §834 Determination of taxable investment income (b) Gross investment income For purposes of subsection (a), the term “gross investment income” means the sum of the following: (1) The gross amount of income during the taxable year from— (A) interest, dividends, rents, and royalties, ……. (D) gains from sales or exchanges of capital assets to the extent provided in subchapter P.

44 §834 Determination of taxable investment income (c) Deductions In computing taxable investment income, the following deductions shall be allowed: (1) Tax-free interest(5) Interest paid or accrued (2) Investment expenses(6) Capital losses (3) Real estate expenses(7) Special deductions (4) Depreciation(8) Trade or business deductions (9) Depletion

45 §834 Determination of taxable investment income (e) Definitions For purposes of this part— (1)Net premiums The term “net premiums” means gross premiums (including deposits and assessments) written or received on insurance contracts during the taxable year less return premiums and premiums paid or incurred for reinsurance.

46 Tax Reporting 831(b) election & Treasury Regulation 301.9100-8 301.9100-8(a)(1) provides a list of elections.

47 Tax Reporting 831(b) election & Treasury Regulation 301.9100-8 Subsection (a)(2) provides the timing for making the list of elections in (a)(1): …the elections described in paragraph (a)(1) of this section must be made by … [t]he due date (taking into account any extensions of time to file obtained by the taxpayer) of the tax return for the first taxable year for which the election is effective.

48 Tax Reporting 831(b) election & Treasury Regulation 301.9100-8 Subsection (a)(3) describes how to file the election.

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50 WITHIN THE UNITED STATESWITHOUT THE UNITED STATES OFFSHORE CAPTIVE 1.On share of income under Subpart F. See 951 (a); and 2.Related person insurance rules. See 953 (c). Foreign Activities of US Taxpayers “Outbound” U.S. Shareholder

51 WITHIN THE UNITED STATESWITHOUT THE UNITED STATES OFFSHORE CAPTIVE 1.On income “effectively connected” with a U.S. trade or business 9see Sec. 882), or, if not effectively connected; U.S. Activities ofU. S. Activities of Foreign Taxpayers “Inbound” Foreign Shareholder 2. On fixed, determinable and periodical income, or “FDAPI.” See 861(a)(7), 871 and 1441.

52 §831(b) Miscellaneous Issues What if the captive fails to meet the $1.2M premium limit? Taxed as a normal captive, so must include underwriting income. “The election can not be made retroactive.” See PLR 201133016.

53 §831(b) Miscellaneous Issues What if you fail to make a timely 831(b) election? See PLR 201045031 – “Any election filed now or in the future would only be effective for the year the election was filed and all subsequent years. The election cannot be made retroactive.”

54 §831(b) Miscellaneous Issues Need an extension of time? See PLR 201045009 – “Taxpayer requests that it be granted an extension of time under section 301.9100-3 to make the election under section 831(b) of the Code to be taxable only on its investment income.” (60 days was granted to make 831(b) election “on a return for the first open taxable year.”)

55 Presenters Frederick E. Turner. J.D. Active Captive Management LLC 16485 Laguna Canyon Road, Suite 200 Irvine, CA 92618 800-921-0155 / fturner@activecaptive.com / www.activecaptive.comturner@activecaptive.comwww.activecaptive.com Jay D. Adkisson, J.D. P.O. Box 7088, Laguna Niguel, CA 92677 949-200-7753 / jayadkisson @ gmail.com / www. Jayadkisson.com David J. Slenn, J.D. Akerman Senterfitt 1415 Panther Lane, Suite 250 Naples, FL 34109  239.591.6766 / david.slenn@akerman.com/ www.akerman.com

56 Disclaimer IRS Circular 230 Notice: Any information pertaining to tax related matters contained in this presentation is not intended or written to be used, and it cannot be used, by any person or entity for the purpose of (i) avoiding tax penalties imposed by any governmental taxing authority or agency, or (ii) promoting, marketing or recommending to another party any tax-related matters addressed herein. Information provided in these materials are for informational purposes only and are not to be reprinted or distributed without written consent. All rights apply.


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