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Microscope Basics (1) Parts and focusing. Label the Compound Light Microscope Ocular lens Body Tube Coarse Adjustment Knob Fine adjustment Knob Revolving.

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Presentation on theme: "Microscope Basics (1) Parts and focusing. Label the Compound Light Microscope Ocular lens Body Tube Coarse Adjustment Knob Fine adjustment Knob Revolving."— Presentation transcript:

1 Microscope Basics (1) Parts and focusing

2 Label the Compound Light Microscope Ocular lens Body Tube Coarse Adjustment Knob Fine adjustment Knob Revolving nosepiece Objective lenses (4x, 10x, 40x) ArmStage Stage Clips Diaphram Light source Base

3 Focusing with a Microscope Plug in and turn on. Plug in and turn on. Lower stage completely. Lower stage completely. Turn nosepiece to low objective. Turn nosepiece to low objective. Raise stage with coarse objective until specimen is seen. (Big knob) Raise stage with coarse objective until specimen is seen. (Big knob) Fine focus the specimen. Fine focus the specimen. Centre specimen in the field of view. Centre specimen in the field of view. Rotate nosepiece to medium power objective. Rotate nosepiece to medium power objective. Refocus with fine adjustment. Refocus with fine adjustment. Re-centre the specimen. Re-centre the specimen. Refocus with fine adjustment. (Be careful not to break the slide.) Refocus with fine adjustment. (Be careful not to break the slide.) Adjust the condenser. (Light) Adjust the condenser. (Light) Start over to look at another specimen. Start over to look at another specimen. Carrying and storage instructions. Carrying and storage instructions.

4 Microscope History and Development Field of view and Magnification

5 Robert Hooke In 1665, the English physicist Robert Hooke looked at a sliver of cork through a microscope lens and noticed some "pores" or "cells" in it. In 1665, the English physicist Robert Hooke looked at a sliver of cork through a microscope lens and noticed some "pores" or "cells" in it. Hooke was the first person to use the word "cell" to identify microscopic structures when he was describing cork. Hooke was the first person to use the word "cell" to identify microscopic structures when he was describing cork.

6 Early Microscopes - Anton Van Leeuwenhoek The father of microscopy, Anton Van Leeuwenhoek of Holland ( ). The father of microscopy, Anton Van Leeuwenhoek of Holland ( ). Anton Van Leeuwenhoek was the first to see and describe bacteria (1674), yeast plants, the teeming life in a drop of water, and the circulation of blood corpuscles in capillaries. Anton Van Leeuwenhoek was the first to see and describe bacteria (1674), yeast plants, the teeming life in a drop of water, and the circulation of blood corpuscles in capillaries.

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8 Antique microscopesAntique microscopes (link) Antique microscopes

9 Technological Advances in Microscopes

10 Compound Light Microscopes Uses light Uses light Has two lenses Has two lenses Magnification limited to 2000x (400x at LHHS) Magnification limited to 2000x (400x at LHHS)

11 Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) Uses beams of electrons Uses beams of electrons Magnification of x Magnification of x Has two limitations: Has two limitations: Good only for thin specimens Good only for thin specimens Only dead cells can be observed Only dead cells can be observed

12 Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) Electrons are reflected from the surface of the specimen Electrons are reflected from the surface of the specimen Produces a 3-d image Produces a 3-d image Good for the thicker specimens Good for the thicker specimens Lacks the magnification and resolution of the transmission electron microscope Lacks the magnification and resolution of the transmission electron microscope

13 Parts of the Compound Microscope

14 Microscope Use AiazzU AiazzU

15 Magnification Magnification – how big an object appears under a microscope compared to it’s actual size. Magnification = Objective lens X Ocular lens (4x, 10x, 40x)(10x)

16 Calculating the size of a specimen binder binder

17 Calculating the size of a specimen Example under med. objective Object size = Size of field of view Number of objects across field of view Object size =1.72 mm 14 Object size =0.1 mm

18 Preparing a wet mount Obtain a clean slide, cover slip, and water bottle Place 1 drop of water in the middle of slide Obtain specimen Place specimen in the drop of water Place the edge of the cover slip on one side of the water drop Slowly lower the cover slip on top of the specimen.

19 Finished with your microscope? Store microscope with the low objective lens in place. Store microscope with the low objective lens in place. Wrap cord around arm and cover microscope. Wrap cord around arm and cover microscope. Wash slides/slips and return. Wash slides/slips and return. Put back in the proper location. Put back in the proper location. Arm always facing outward. Arm always facing outward.


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