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© 2012 FSG 1 FSG.ORG Large Scale Social Change: Funding for Collective Impact Pathways of Possibility: Transforming Education's Role in Reentry February.

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Presentation on theme: "© 2012 FSG 1 FSG.ORG Large Scale Social Change: Funding for Collective Impact Pathways of Possibility: Transforming Education's Role in Reentry February."— Presentation transcript:

1 © 2012 FSG 1 FSG.ORG Large Scale Social Change: Funding for Collective Impact Pathways of Possibility: Transforming Education's Role in Reentry February 27, 2013

2 © 2012 FSG 2 FSG.ORG Achieving Large-Scale Change through Collective Impact Involves Five Key Elements Common Agenda Common understanding of the problem Shared vision for change Shared Measurement Collecting data and measuring results Focus on performance management Shared accountability Mutually Reinforcing Activities Differentiated approaches Coordination through joint plan of action Continuous Communication Consistent and open communication Focus on building trust Backbone Support Separate organization(s) with staff Resources and skills to convene and coordinate participating organizations Source: Channeling Change: Making Collective Impact Work, 2012; FSG Interviews and Analysis Five Elements of Collective Impact

3 © 2012 FSG 3 FSG.ORG Collective Impact Is Being Used to Solve Complex Social Problems in a Wide Range of Sectors Collective Impact Momentum Across Sectors Education Healthcare Economic Development Youth Development Homelessness Community Development Source: FSG Interviews and Analysis

4 © 2012 FSG 4 FSG.ORG Taking a Collective Impact Approach Offers Funders the Opportunity to Amplify Impact, Leverage Funding, and Drive Alignment Benefits of Collective Impact Amplify Impact Increase Efficiency of Resources Drive Alignment Involves multiple partners working towards long term, systemic change Offers a holistic approach by channeling the energy of various stakeholders towards solving a problem Provides opportunities to influence the system from within and outside by coupling advocacy with action Allows more efficient use of funding, especially in times of scarce resources Enables leveraging of public and private sources of funding Opens channels for organizations to access additional funding against an issue Reduces duplication of services Increases coordination Embeds the drive for sustained social change within the community Source: FSG Interviews and Analysis

5 © 2012 FSG 5 FSG.ORG A New Paradigm for Funders Shifting from Isolated Impact to Collective Impact Requires a Different Approach on the Part of Funders Source: FSG Interviews and Analysis The current approach of many funders is less conducive to solving complex problems: Funders develop internal foundation strategy Funders pick and fund individual grantees, who work separately and compete to produce results Funders build capacity of individual organizations Funders evaluate individual grants and determine attribution Funders are held accountable to internal stakeholders (e.g., Board) In a collective impact context, funders shift their mindset to an “adaptive” approach more aligned with complex issues: Funders co-create strategy with other key stakeholders Funders evaluate progress towards a social goal and degree of contribution to its solution Funders build the capacity of multiple organizations to work together Funders fund a long-term process of change around a specific problem in active collaboration with many organizations within a larger system Funders are held jointly accountable for achievement of goals developed as part of effort Funders pre-determine approaches to get to the desired outcome Funders must be flexible and adaptive to get to the intended outcome with stakeholders Funders work independently and don’t always coordinate their actions with other funders Funders actively coordinate their action and share lessons learned

6 © 2012 FSG 6 FSG.ORG Funders Can Engage in Collective Impact Efforts in a Number of Ways Types of Funder Roles Sample Funder Role DescriptionExamples Catalyst Funder initiates collective impact strategy as champion, financier, and convener, potentially playing a key role in attracting resources throughout the effort Backbone Organization Funder organizes and coordinates the actions of cross-sector stakeholders to advance collective impact effort Participant Funder actively participates in collective impact effort, and aligns funding and measurement to the effort Source: FSG Interviews and Analysis Funders can play a wide range of roles in Collect Impact efforts, even within these categories

7 © 2012 FSG 7 FSG.ORG Funder Activities Can Take a Number of Diverse Forms Over the Course of a Collective Impact Effort Examples of Funder Activities in Collective Impact Phase II Organize for Impact Phase III Sustain Action and Impact Phase I Initiate Action Fund data collection / research required to make the case for collective impact Encourage grantees and stakeholders to collaborate Encourage other funders to join the effort / align with other funders Use convening power to draw key stakeholders to the table Broker relationships to create open lines of communication between stakeholders Participate on Steering Committee Fund backbone infrastructure Fund shared measurement systems Fund trainings to increase stakeholder expertise in key collective impact skill sets e.g., leadership, group planning Fund research on evidence- based practices Encourage grantees and other stakeholders to align evaluation to shared measures Convene community stakeholders Participate on working groups or Steering Committee Align funding with the common goals and measures of the effort Continue to fund backbone infrastructure and shared measurement systems Fund discrete initiatives identified through the collective impact effort Provide content expertise on evidence-based practices Continue to encourage grantees and other stakeholders to align evaluation to shared measures Align strategy with other funders and actively coordinate Participate on working groups or Steering Committee Source: FSG Interviews and Analysis Illustrative Funder Activities

8 © 2012 FSG 8 FSG.ORG Key Success Factors for Effective Funder Engagement Include Institutional Adaptability, Culture Shifts, and Long-Term Orientation Success Factors for Funders Culture Shift Institutional Adaptability Long-term Orientation  Flexibility to work outside of traditional grant cycles and established internal processes  Ability to be nimble in pursing opportunities as they arise, without being prescriptive about the outcome  Willingness to learn new skill sets required – including partnering, facilitation, communication, community engagement, and convening  Comfort with uncertainty and adaptability required to engage with community and stakeholders  Awareness of shift in power dynamic among funders, grantees, and other stakeholders  Openness to funding infrastructure, which is often seen as less attractive than funding direct services or interventions  Commitment to achieving progress on a specific issue, regardless of attribution vs. contribution  Understanding of timespan required for systemic change, making a long- term commitment  Comfort with measuring progress using interim milestones and process measures Source: FSG Interviews and Analysis

9 9 FSG.ORG © 2012 FSG NYS Juvenile Justice Collective Impact Case Study  September 2010: Steering Committee of key leaders in juvenile justice from across the state is convened  Membership reflected all interested stakeholder groups  Facilitation of the visioning process was critical; an early common vision set the stage for progress  Improving outcomes for youth and communities requires a coordinated, strategic effort by multiple actors working toward a shared vision and common goals “The juvenile justice system is a highly complex network of public and private agencies, organizations, courts, policies, and procedures at a state and local level, and also includes myriad connection points to other systems.” Safe Communities Successful Youth: A Shared Vision for the New York State Juvenile Justice System

10 10 FSG.ORG © 2012 FSG Strategic Plan Set the Stage for Concrete Progress  July 2011: Steering Committee releases its Strategy and Action Plan, which includes four guiding principles and ten critical near-term action steps that will be needed to transform the juvenile justice system in New York State  The full report is available at successful-youth-full-version.pdf successful-youth-full-version.pdf

11 11 FSG.ORG © 2012 FSG SPAC VISION – Promote youth success and ensure public safety Assure Quality System Governance, Accountability and Coordination – Create and support structures at the state and local level that ensure coordination and accountability for achieving system goals Implement an Effective Continuum of Services Based on Best Practices – Effectively assess, serve and treat youth in evidence-informed and appropriate services close to their homes, fostering family and community engagement and positive outcomes for youth Collect and Share Data to Make Information-Driven Decisions and Policy – Share and analyze qualitative and quantitative data to guide service provision, decision making and system-level reform and policy Accountability of System and Organizations Within the System

12 12 FSG.ORG © 2012 FSG Creation of the Strategic Planning ACTION Committee  July 2011: NYS Juvenile Justice Steering Committee releases Strategic Plan and evolves into the Strategic Planning ACTION Committee (SPAC), led by Deputy Secretary Liz Glazer and Judge Sharon Townsend  September 2011: SPAC assumes oversight of strategic plan implementation  September – December 2011: Staffing is assumed by staff to the Deputy Secretary for Public Safety

13 13 FSG.ORG © 2012 FSG Progress on Strategic Plan Action Steps Goal 1: Assure Quality System Governance, Accountability and Coordination ACTION STEPCOMPLETEIN PROGRESS 1. Ongoing Coordination: Evolve Steering Committee into a Strategic Planning Action Committee (SPAC), with devoted staff time the Governor’s Office, DCJS and OCFS. 2. Multi-Stakeholder Input: Evolve the existing working groups to establish an ongoing role in providing regular feedback and guidance to the SPAC. 3. Performance Measures: Finalize agreement on a set of high-level system outcomes and performance measures. 4. Ongoing Input from Localities: RFP for creating the Regional Youth Justice Teams has been released, and solicitations are due April 15th; A ListServ with nearly 1,500 addresses has been created and has been utilized to get the word out about the RFP. Develop a plan to implement local interagency advisory teams. 5. Feedback Mechanisms: The SPAC will be utilized as the feedback mechanism for the Regional Youth Justice Teams. Establish regular mechanisms to gather feedback where necessary, and share emerging plans and strategies for system reform with key stakeholders around the state.

14 14 FSG.ORG © 2012 FSG Progress on Strategic Plan Action Steps Goal 2: Implement an Effective Continuum of Services Based on Best Practices ACTION STEPCOMPLETEIN PROGRESS 6. Analysis of Continuum:  DCJS IT staff has completed the structure of the database, and it is live and online with preliminary program information for several counties. NYC ACS and Probation will disseminate a letter to all program managers with a request to fill out a survey that will be used to populate the database with NYC programs, and the juvenile justice ListServ will be used to distribute the survey in hopes that other counties will also begin to populate their information. In addition, once the Regional Youth Justice Teams are established, they will be the mechanisms utilized to assess the current continuum of providers relative to juvenile delinquency and re-evaluate on an ongoing basis. Conduct analysis of current continuum of providers across the state, and assess relative to juvenile delinquency. 7. Performance Contracting and Quality Standards: A new performance measures system has been implemented for DCJS juvenile justice contracts. In addition, a "Results First" project is currently underway in the area of public safety in an effort to implement and utilize empirical data to help decision makers balance the distribution of programs and dedicate funding to those programs that generate the best returns on the investment. Implement and effectively utilize uniform performance-based contracting and quality standards for public and private providers. 8. Financing Models and Oversight Structures: A new work group has been established to analyze potential financing models with an emphasis on performance-based contracting and quality standards. The first meeting was held February 22, 2013, and the group plans to have a preliminary recommendation to the SPAC at its May quarterly meeting. Conduct analysis of potential financing models, oversight structures, and case jurisdiction responsibilities. 9. Support for What Works: A new work group has been established to develop a recommended plan for rolling out a new best practices center. The first meeting was held February 21, 2013, and the group plans to have a recommendation to the SPAC at its May quarterly meeting. Establish an interactive, best practice clearinghouse to expand the capacity of the state to adopt both research-driven and evidence- informed practices.

15 15 FSG.ORG © 2012 FSG Progress on Strategic Plan Action Steps Goal 3: Collect and Share Data to Make Information-Driven Decisions and Policies ACTION STEPCOMPLETEIN PROGRESS 10. Data Infrastructure and Analysis:  The SPAC Data and Performance Measures work group is currently taking a look at the experiences of a NYC group that has been involved in a Georgetown Capstone project on information sharing to determine whether some of the work that has been done could be integrated on a statewide basis. The group is also working toward resolving OCA race/ethnicity issues and looking at ways to leverage data work currently being done with respect to the development of a statewide Detention Risk Assessment Instrument. Establish the data infrastructure and analytical capacity necessary to improve outcomes.

16 16 FSG.ORG © 2012 FSG For Your Discussion How could a collective impact strategy apply to your work? What are your next steps to take in order to start a collective impact effort in your work? What outcome would you like to see from a collective impact effort in your work?


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