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Jon Parker Vice President, Community Investments United Way of the Bluegrass Planning for and Seeking Grant Funding.

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Presentation on theme: "Jon Parker Vice President, Community Investments United Way of the Bluegrass Planning for and Seeking Grant Funding."— Presentation transcript:

1 Jon Parker Vice President, Community Investments United Way of the Bluegrass Planning for and Seeking Grant Funding

2 Area Traditional UWUnited Way in TransitionCommunity Impact United Way Resource Development Focus is on workplace campaign, all resources raised by United Way Focus is on workplace campaign with some efforts to leverage resources from other sources Resources raised with an increasing focus on diversified funding streams including workplace campaign, individual donors, grants, sponsorships, etc. Resource Investment Traditional and historical, member-agencies only Traditional agencies, selectively open to others with emphasis placed on community priorities and results-based accountability Based on community change sought, inclusive and integrated mix of investments to change systems and strengthen community Measures of Success Success measured in dollars raised, achieving campaign goal, people served Measured in dollars raised, achieving campaign goal, success in achieving impact on a select basis Success primarily measured based on impact on community issues and conditions United Way’s shift to community impact…

3 UWBG Education Agenda Build a culture of enthusiasm and excitement for quality early learning. Increase student and family engagement and student success in elementary learning. Increase student and family engagement and student success in middle school through successful transition to and completion of high school. Increase successful transition to career readiness.

4 How we invest? Super Saturdays

5 How we invest? Trailblazers Senior Volunteers In the past, we often invested in reaction to community crisis We are often motivated to give to an agency with a certain appeal Your United Way is focusing on community solutions to our most pressing needs

6 How we invest? PNC Countdown to Kindergarten In the past, we often invested in reaction to community crisis We are often motivated to give to an agency with a certain appeal Your United Way is focusing on community solutions to our most pressing needs

7 How we invest? Toyota bornlearning Academies

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10 Building Relationships Propriety – Is the ability and willingness to meet the customer’s external expectations of business customs and behavior Competence – Is the perception that you have the capability and experience to help customers with their business needs Commonality – Refers to the customer’s perception that you both hold things in common – interests, beliefs and values Intent – Is an open declaration of your interest in the customer’s success and well being – Wilson Learning Worldwide

11 Discovery – Finding Commonality Interacting with a potential partner, asking certain types of questions designed to help you identify and understand their specific goals and needs. What types of issues stay top of mind or most nag you? What’s most interesting to you about our agenda to address early childhood needs? What is important to you about the Early Childhood Council’s role? What should we know about your short term or long term thinking when it comes to your support of various causes? What types of causes has your company historically supported? What is the most important aspect of your company’s giving strategy? If you could wave a magic wand, what opportunities would you create for every child? What keeps you awake at night?

12 Product Plan: High Level: All Children Ready for Kindergarten, Ready to Learn Mid Level Product: Teach specific skills, parent engagement, center-based education, volunteer matching with children Specific Product: Countdown to Kindergarten, Super Saturday, bornlearning Academies, Trailblazers - senior volunteer nurturers

13 Grants: Eyes Wide Open The myth of the blank check You may not be eligible You may not be qualified Be careful what you wish for Try not to personalize your results Be comprehensive Rarely long-term Often project specific Frequently enough to get you started, must plan for sustainability

14 Grants: Funding Types Contract for services Sub contract for services Grant for specified program Cooperative agreement Corporate program funding Corporate sponsorship

15 Know your Potential Funder: Field of interest, funding history Geographic scope What type of support do they fund (seed funding, capital, operating, program specific)? What organizations do they like to fund? Range of funding Process for application

16 Grant Proposals – The Key Ingredients Organizational capability – characteristics that demonstrate your credibility Needs and problems – and how you propose to solve Intended objectives and results Ability to develop a sensible program plan Evaluation of effectiveness The full funding picture A reasonable budget

17 Where to look: Public and college/university library – grants collections Online newsletters – Newsletters for organizations (Bluegrass Community Foundation) Grants.gov Partner with nonprofit that researches grant opportunities Google search/Google alerts Foundation mailing lists

18 Thank you

19 An “APPROACH” to Fundraising and Grant Writing Bradley Stevenson Executive Director Child Care Council of KY, Inc.

20 THE APPROACH A – Awareness and Action P – Plan, Plan, Plan P – Partnerships R – Relationships, Resources & Reality O – Open To New Ideas and Ways of Thinking A – Alone? C – Creativity H – Homework

21 AWARENESS AND ACTION Fundraising – Who’s willing to partner? What’s your cause? When’s the best time to fundraise? Where does the money go? Why you? How (Action) to make it happen? Host An Event

22 AWARENESS AND ACTION Grant Writing – What’s Available (Google)? Are you eligible? Key Partnerships Critical to Diversify Funding

23 PLAN, PLAN, PLAN Develop A List of Goals and Objectives for Grant Writing and Fundraising – What is it you are trying to accomplish? Be prepared to “Tell Your Story” Your Plan Must Be Flexible!

24 PARTNERSHIPS Fundraising – Who’s willing to partner – Other non-profits – Local Restaurants – Local TV – Local School Systems (not always $$ raised but connections made) – Fundraising is Relational! – Don’t Assume Anything!

25 PARTNERSHIPS Grant Writing – Local School Systems Local CCR&R Agencies Local Libraries Local United Way Local Community Foundations LOCAL, LOCAL, LOCAL = Non Duplication of Services

26 Relationships, Resources & Reality Fundraising – Who you know that’s willing to support your cause? Who has the resources in your community – Businesses – Banks, Restaurants, Real Estate Agents, Hospitals, etc. People and Businesses support causes that interest them – how do you “tug at the heartstrings?”

27 RELATIONSHIPS, RESOURCES & REALITY Grant Writing – Know your funders and potential funders – it’s important …. Visibility is Critical! What resources do you have at your disposal? – There’s value and knowledge in people – Innovative doesn’t always mean “new” Everyone is asked to “Do More With Less”

28 OPEN TO NEW IDEAS/WAYS OF THINKING - If you do the same thing the same way, you will get the same results – EVERY TIME! -Don’t let the past determine your future! -“Doing More With Less” is a reality – Thinking Differently Is An Absolute

29 ALONE? You can’t write quality grants or fundraise effectively ALONE! – People around you are your best resource – know what skills they bring! – People have knowledge – leverage it! – When you try to do these both alone = burnout is almost an absolute – Be “inclusive” not “exclusive”

30 CREATIVITY Grant Writing - -Innovation does not always mean “new” -What resources do you currently have? -What needs “fixin’” and what needs “nixin’” -Sometimes means being collaborative -What role does technology play? Fundraising – Be Different (Tough Mudders, Rappelling) Restaurants love fundraising Peak Interests

31 HOMEWORK Grant Writing – Know the “do’s” & “don’ts” – What’s the need? – Grant guidelines – important dates, required documentation, etc. – Research – have the most up-to-date data, use data to show the need, etc. – Who can write, who can complete a budget, who can proofread, etc. – Don’t procrastinate – Who are your partners? – Is this a duplication of services?

32 HOMEWORK Fundraising – Know the Local Events Calendar What’s Been Successful Be Different (Tough Mudders, Rappelling) Remember to be Relational Follow Up Is CRITICAL Make It Family Friendly Be In It For the Long Haul Make it “FUN”

33 EXTRA, EXTRA – THE “ES” OF APPROACH(ES) Evaluation is key – What worked well – What needs tweaking – What needs to be eliminated Support Systems – Local CECC’s are in place to be local support systems for early care and education in KY (along with many others – CCR&R’s, RTC’s, CCHC’s, etc)

34 Relationships and Partnerships are critical to both grant writing and fundraising Thinking differently is not just OK, it’s an absolute today You don’t have to “Reinvent the Wheel” – use the resources you have to be innovative Continual evaluation is the key to continual improvement


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