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PACS 4500 Senior Seminar in Peace and Conflict Studies Guy Burgess Co-Director Conflict Information Consortium, University of Colorado UCB 580, University.

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Presentation on theme: "PACS 4500 Senior Seminar in Peace and Conflict Studies Guy Burgess Co-Director Conflict Information Consortium, University of Colorado UCB 580, University."— Presentation transcript:

1 PACS 4500 Senior Seminar in Peace and Conflict Studies Guy Burgess Co-Director Conflict Information Consortium, University of Colorado UCB 580, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO , (303) Copyright © 2014 Guy Burgess and Heidi Burgess

2 Turning In Assignments

3 Concept Papers

4 Ferguson learned-from-the-shooting-of-michael-brown/

5 People Skills on/skills-in-flux.html?_r=0

6 Finding/Understanding Opportunities Follow the Money

7 Opportunity Search Goals  Identify organizations and projects working in your areas of interest that may offer job opportunities  Identify potential funding sources for projects that you (or your organization) may wish to initiate  Learn how to write and submit proposals  Develop a comprehensive image of the full scope of peace and conflict practice  Situate your goals and activities in the context of the work of others  Identify potential collaborators  Identify organizations doing related work may be a source of inspiration and ideas  This is a time consuming process with economies of scale. So, find partners!

8 Step #1: Access a Major Funding Database contracts/spin-funding-opportunities/

9 Step #2: Become an Advanced “Power User” Note: These systems are undergoing major changes and improvements. While the system illustrated here is being replaced (and the screenshots offered here do not match), the general strategy is still workable and make sense.

10 Step #3: Master Advanced Search

11 Step #4: Find and Understand Keyword System

12 Step #5: Identify Search Terms  Start with your plain English “buzzwords” for describing your areas of subject and geographic interest  Also include type of funding program  Use the search system’s keyword thesaurus to try to identify the terms that it uses for the same subjects  Run some searches and identify a few of the most promising results and look for related search terms and buzzwords and add those to your search term list  Run a full search

13 Step #6: Review Results

14 Step #7: Investigate Promising Programs Be willing to think in new and creative ways and adapt your ideas to the funding environment

15 Step #8: Investigate Funder Program Websites

16 Understand Grantmaking Process

17 Google Projects of Interest

18 Understand Funder Interests

19 Find Grants Awarded

20 Investigate Grants of Interest

21 Think About Next Steps  Network with promising projects  Pursue collaboration  Seek jobs  Adapt good ideas to other contexts  Write proposals for “fill in the gaps” projects

22 Funder Motivations: The Campfire Test  Hope: Bragging Rights  Fear: Funding Embarrassing Projects

23 Proposal Writing  A worthwhile and lucrative skill to develop  Further assistance:  University of Wisconsin University of Wisconsin

24 501(c)3

25 JAMS Foundation

26 Current Areas of Interest  Conflict Resolution Education : In order to promote the inclusion of conflict prevention and resolution in classroom instruction and school programs, the Foundation supports training of teachers and school administrators, as well as the development and distribution of curricular and teaching materials that introduce students to dispute resolution concepts and training.  Peer Mediation : Peer mediation programs in schools have proven effective in reducing violence and teaching peaceful negotiation skills to our nation’s youth. The Foundation may provide grants to support the preparation, printing, and distribution of peer mediation training materials on a national level.  Community Mediation : The Foundation provides resources and support for community mediation programs and national distribution of community mediation training materials.  Professional Education : The Foundation supports the advancement of ADR through improvements to professional education and will consider grants to promote innovations in teaching ADR or to stimulate interest and excellence through awards and recognitions.  Innovations in Resolving Disputes and Making Dispute Resolution Services More Available : Innovations in community and non-profit organizational delivery of dispute resolution services, particularly to underserved populations, is encouraged and supported by the Foundation.  International Dispute Resolution Programs : The Foundation may award grants to U.S.-based organizations that provide dispute resolution assistance in transitioning and developing countries.

27 JAMS “How to Apply for a Grant”  Purpose of potential request  How the proposal relates to the Foundation’s current areas of interest  Why the proposal is unique and why is it needed  Changes that will occur as a result of funding the proposal  Plans for evaluating the project's success (i.e., how will you know that the project’s goals have been met?)  The organization’s history, mission, and goals  Name(s) and qualifications of designated project director(s)  Other organizations engaged in work similar to the proposed project  Anticipated project budget, including amount of funding sought from the Foundation  Other funding sources for the project and amounts applied for, received, or committed  If intended as an ongoing program, plans for sustaining the program

28 Address Funder Questions

29 Keep Things Short, Use Bullets

30 Budget Personnel Expenses Project Directors / Key Individuals -- Listed by name, FTE, base salary, and time period – contractual obligation G raduate students – no name salary, tuition-waiver, FTE, time period Undergraduate students – salary, tuition-waiver, FTE, time period Others Fringe Benefits Listed by category, fixed percentage (28%-1%) Expenses Travel Equipment Contractors Etc. Indirect Costs 0-50% Matching Funds Dates

31 Expenditure Category-Oriented Budget

32 Task-Oriented Budget

33 For Complex, Organic Systems The Medical Model System evolved through processes of natural and social selection Medicine, ecosystems, economies, conflict No Plans Exist — only observational studies of particular (usually troublesome) aspects of the system Injuries and pathologies (also opportunities to increase performance) Focus is on treating as many of the most damaging pathologies as possible while also taking advantage of opportunities (e.g. Olympic training) Treatments include: complete cure, symptomatic relief, “learning to live with” incurable chronic conditions, “terminal” conditions.

34 Destructive Conflict Dynamics/Traps Conflict dynamics that undermine the functioning of “Power-With” societies

35 Traps (abridged) 1.Tragedy of the commons 2.The posterity trap 3.Positional bargaining 4.Backlash 5.“He who has, gets” 6.Resource curse 7.Confirmation bias 8.Lord Acton’s principle 9.Certainty illusion 10.Hammer’s law 11.“Into the sea” framing 12.“Boiled frog” trap 13.“Riding the tiger” 14.Lance Armstrong 15.Risky/cautious shifts 16.“Lost keys” syndrome 17.Free rider 18.Polarization 19.Escalation 20.Victimhood bias 21.Conflicts of interest

36 Tragedy of the Commons Tragedy the Commons

37 Posterity Trap Pursuit of short- term greed at the expense of long- term sustainability. Posterity Trap “What has posterity ever done for me?”

38 Backlash Trap The number of "new enemies" created in the process of defeating an "old enemy”

39 Matthew’s Law “To whomsoever hath, to him shall be given” Kenneth Boulding “He Who Has Gets” Trap

40 Resource Curse

41 Confirmation Bias Cognitive Dissonance

42 Lord Acton’s Principle Absolute power corrupts absolutely

43 The Illusion of Certainty

44 Hammer’s Law

45 “Into the Sea” Framing

46 The “Boiled Frog” Syndrome

47 Riding the Tiger

48 The Lance Armstrong Effect In a highly competitive environment, cheating (exploitation of customers, employees, and the environment) is the tie-breaker. The “win” goes to the best cheater. For capitalism to work, government must “level the playing field” by preventing cheating.

49 Risky / Cautious Shift

50 Don’t fall into the “Lost Key” trap, Tackle the Tough Problems  Machiavellian spoilers  “Narrowcast,” “confirmation biased” media  The “double-cross” fear/lack of trust problem  Non-rational decision- making  The “posterity” trap  Many others...

51 The Free Rider Problem If you’re not part of the solution your part of the problem Eldridge Cleaver

52 Escalation Conflict Intensification Beginnings Out-Group Identity Worst Case Bias Victim Bias Grievances Enmity Reinforcement Self-Fulfilling Prophecy Recreational Complaint Tactical Choices Invincibility Illusion Tactical Escalation / Response Coalition Building/Polarization Rachets Sacrifice Trap Shame Trap Personalization Breakover Interpersonal Attack Unthinking Anger Violence Breakover Vengeance Self-Defense Feedback Loops

53 Polarization

54 Victimhood Bias

55 Conflict of Interest “It is difficult to get a man to understand something, when his salary depends on his not understanding it.” Upton Sinclair

56 Traps (abridged) 1.Tragedy of the commons 2.The posterity trap 3.Positional bargaining 4.Backlash 5.“He who has, gets” 6.Resource curse 7.Confirmation bias 8.Lord Acton’s principle 9.Certainty illusion 10.Hammer’s law 11.“Into the sea” framing 12.“Boiled frog” trap 13.“Riding the tiger” 14.Lance Armstrong 15.Risky/cautious shifts 16.“Lost keys” syndrome 17.Free rider 18.Polarization 19.Escalation 20.Victimhood bias 21.Conflicts of interest


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