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DO NOW– In your notebook Here is the definition of water pollution: The introduction of chemical, physical, or biological agents into water that degrade.

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Presentation on theme: "DO NOW– In your notebook Here is the definition of water pollution: The introduction of chemical, physical, or biological agents into water that degrade."— Presentation transcript:

1 DO NOW– In your notebook Here is the definition of water pollution: The introduction of chemical, physical, or biological agents into water that degrade water quality and adversely affect the organisms that depend on the water. 1. Would litter be considered water pollution? 2. List some types of pollutants that end up in our waters.

2 Point vs. Non-Point Source Pollution

3 Point vs. Non-point Source Pollution Point Source Pollution discharged from a single source Source can be identified Can be regulated by law Non-Point Source Many sources Difficult to identify origin “People pollution” Difficult to regulate

4 Point Source Pollution Examples: – Discharge from pipe – Leak at chemical plant or storage tank – Oil Spill (BP 2010)

5 Point - Industrial

6 Point – Leaking Underground Storage Tanks

7 Point – Unlined Landfills

8 Point – Leaking Septic Tanks

9 Point – Acid Drainage from Mines

10 Non-Point Source Pollution Pesticides Fertilizers Animal Waste Road Salt Litter Sediment Runoff Oil and Gasoline

11 Non-Point Pollution

12 NonPoint – Acid Rain

13 NonPoint – Salting Roads

14 You may have seen this… Rainbow stain is created when motor oil leaks from vehicles onto roadways

15 People Pollution Lawn fertilizers and pesticides

16 When nobody’s looking…

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18 Review- Point v. Non-point Examples POINT SourceNON-POINT Source

19 Why are they bad? Road Salt- changes salinity of freshwater Pesticides- chemicals designed to kill Fertilizers- eutrophication Litter- wildlife, aesthetics ruined Sediment- suffocates, blankets riverbed Oil- affects oxygen levels, wildlife

20 Controlling Pollution Point Sources: – Industrial discharges are regulated by the NJ Dept. of Environmental Protection (NJDEP) or EPA Monitored discharges Cannot exceed certain limits on pollution – Once source is identified, we know who to blame Fines $$$

21 Non-Point Regulation More difficult to monitor/regulate because we don’t know the source Watershed Management, Education, Outreach Impose Restrictions, Fines, Penalties – Silt fences for construction sites – Fines for littering, pet waste, illegal dumping – Farms have laws to regulate livestock waste

22 Watershed Management Land Use affects water quality Rain washes pollutants from watershed into water bodies As urbanization increases, NPS pollution increases

23

24 NonPoint – Urban Run-Off

25 Storm water Management Storm drains bring storm water directly to local waterways, NOT a Treatment plant!

26 The Storm Water Dilemma As urbanization increases  Impervious surfaces increase  More storm water is sent down drains at a faster rate  Localized flooding increases Constant problem in NJ

27 Silt fences- keeps sediments ON SITE

28 Farms- Riparian “buffer zones” Riparian vegetation = “near water” Having native vegetation near streams and rivers catches sediments and nutrients (N&P) before they reach the water

29 What can you do to prevent non-point source pollution?

30 What can you do? Non-point pollution prevention starts at home! Don’t Litter! Pick up after pets Limit fertilizer/pesticide usage at home Bring waste oil to auto body shop Maintain your vehicle

31 How are watersheds, aquifers (groundwater) and surface water all connected to point/non-point source pollution?

32 Wrapping Up… 1What is the difference between point and non-point source pollution? 2Name three examples of non-point source pollution. 3What is the purpose of a riparian buffer zone?

33 Extra Information “The Clean Water Book” /waterbook_tble.html /waterbook_tble.html “Frogline” Video on NPS Pollution-


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