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11 12 13 14 15 16. 1Wooded area 2Motorway 3Bus station 4Nature reserve 5Public convenience (toilet) 6Train station 7Church 8Picnic site 9Church with a.

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Presentation on theme: "11 12 13 14 15 16. 1Wooded area 2Motorway 3Bus station 4Nature reserve 5Public convenience (toilet) 6Train station 7Church 8Picnic site 9Church with a."— Presentation transcript:

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2 1Wooded area 2Motorway 3Bus station 4Nature reserve 5Public convenience (toilet) 6Train station 7Church 8Picnic site 9Church with a steeple 10Campsite 11Garden 12Place of tourist interest 13Youth hostel 14View point 15Country park 16National trust. Answers to the map quiz.

3 Revision 2 This is what you need to know. 1.The tourism industry is important in many parts of the developed world. 2.Investigate the range of economic, social, cultural and environmental benefits tourism brings to established tourist locations. Include a study of at least one established tourist location in a more developed country.

4 3.Tourism can create challenges for people and communities. 4.Investigate the range of social and cultural challenges caused by the development of tourism, including the study of two places at different stages of economic development. 5.Investigate examples of how different tourist activities can conflict with each other and local communities. 6.An investigation of the conflicts in one tourist honey pot.

5 Impacts of tourism on people who live there. Positives (Good things)Negatives (bad things) improvements to transport and essential facilities (infrastructure) for locals disruption to everyday life access to facilities provided for tourists, such as swimming pool/health clubs (dual use facilities) crime employment opportunities hostility and resentment improved awareness of other cultures. increased cost of living, house prices, food.

6 Impacts of tourism on the environment. PositivesNegatives regeneration – urban renewal, reuse of traditional buildings for new activities loss of habitats conservation – protection of wildlife, creation of National Parks, nature reserves, protected areas loss of wildlife/threatened species creation of more open spaces, parks pollution (noise, air, water, visual) improved ‘street furniture’ (lighting, seating, use of floral displays). overcrowding traffic congestion.

7 Managing Tourism in a honey pot site. The Lake District. – Bowness. Give the car a holiday campaign. Free guide. The guide shows visitors how to reach and get around using public transport and other modes. It educates people by describing the benefits of giving the car a holiday, including a positive impact on health by doing more exercise such as walking and the added value that new experiences, such as travelling by bus or riding a bike, can give to a break or longer vacation.

8 Putting in footpaths to manage where tourists go. To avoid erosion on the hills, footpaths have been put in so that the land is not eroded away by the millions of walkers that go there every year. People then stick to the path and don’t wonder off into other areas.

9 Parking: 1.Charge for parking to discourage so many cars. 2.fence off roadsides so people cannot damage verges 3.reinforce car-park surfaces to prevent damage. 'Waffles' are large concrete slabs with holes in them. Soil fills the holes and grass grows, giving a hard green surface. It prevents the land from being eroded.

10 Litter bins with lids to stop it flying away and making the place look untidy. Only in designated areas such as car parks and picnic sites. Litter bins have been taken away from footpaths to encourage tourists to take litter home with them.

11 Study Figure 1 which shows some opinions about tourism in Southwold. Figure 1

12 2 (b) (ii) Describe two ways that tourism can provide opportunities for people living in places such as Southwold. (4 marks) 2 (c) Tourism can cause problems in places such as Southwold. These problems can be managed. (i) Give two examples of problems which might be caused by tourism in places like Southwold. ( 2 marks) (ii) You have investigated the problems caused by tourists visiting areas. Name a place you have studied where tourism creates problems. Explain how the problems are being managed. (5 marks) Questions foundation tier.

13 2 (b) (i) What do you understand by the term ‘honeypot sites’? (2 marks) 2 (b) (ii) Explain how tourism can benefit the economy of places such as Southwold. (4 marks) 2 (c) Tourism can cause problems and create conflicts in places such as Southwold. These problems can be managed. (i) You have investigated the problems and conflicts caused by tourists visiting areas. Name a place you have studied where tourism creates problems. Explain how the problems are being managed. (6 marks) Questions higher tier.

14 Mark scheme – Foundation question. 2(b)(ii) Level 1 (Basic) 1–2 marks Simple points suggested with little development. May be direct lift from resource. Example bring jobs and money, provide facilities/things to do, bus services run, more shops, area kept clean and tidy. Knowledge of basic information Simple understanding Few links; limited detail; uses a limited range of specialist terms Level 2 (Clear) 3–4 marks There is some development of points showing clear understanding and link to opportunity, possibly linking to examples of places. Requires development from the resource. Example “local people without cars can get to other places more easily because there are more buses”, “more jobs available means people earn more money and improve their quality of life”, “because of tourists the area is kept clean and the beach cleared of litter which improves the area for local people.” Knowledge of accurate information Clear understanding Answers have some linkages; occasional detail/examples given; uses some specialist terms where appropriate. 2(c)(i). 2 marks Any reasonable problems which can be linked to touris. Example. litter, noise, gates left open letting animals escape, congestion, seasonal employment, high house prices, pick pocketing/car crime etc. Pollution points need qualification 2(c)(ii) Points do not need to link to problems identified in previous question. Level 1 (Basic) 1–3 marks Simple points relevant to problems created by tourism suggested with little development. Example. litter bins, park and ride, more buses, council housing/cheap rents, signage and information, more police/traffic wardens, more car parks etc. Knowledge of basic information Simple understanding Few links; limited detail; uses a limited range of specialist terms Level 2 (Clear) 4-5 marks Some development of points showing clear understanding of management. A place needs to be named for L2, although this might not be linked to specific management points. Example “park and ride systems will keep vehicles out of narrow streets and reduce congestion problems and problems with tourists parking in the way of local people”, “in Blackpool the beach is cleaned every morning during the summer to make sure that there is no litter on it to put off visitors. Dogs are also banned from the beach.” Knowledge of accurate information Clear understanding Answers have some linkages; occasional detail/exemplar; uses some specialist terms where appropriate

15 Answers for Higher question. 2(b)(i) Sites that attract visitors (1) in large numbers (1). 2 marks 2(b)(ii) Points must relate to benefits to the economy – jobs and money, although broader benefits such as tax revenue (via council tax) or house prices could be justified. Level 1 (Basic) 1–2 marks Simple points lacking development, e.g. “lots of jobs created”, “money brought into the area”, “shops have more customers” etc. Knowledge of basic information Simple understanding Few links; limited detail; uses a limited range of specialist terms Level 2 (Clear) 3-4 marks More detailed answer with some development of points e.g. “Jobs are created earning people money. Some of this money gets spent in local businesses creating a multiplier effect because more jobs get created to deal with the extra business”, “more tourists means more money for local shops which means more profits for shop owners.” Knowledge of accurate information Clear understanding Answers have some linkages; occasional detail/exemplar; uses some specialist terms where appropriate 2(c)(i) Level 1 (Basic) 1–2 marks Simple points relevant to problems created by tourism suggested with little development, e.g. litter bins, park and ride, more buses, council housing/cheap rents, signage and information, more police/traffic wardens, more car parks etc. Knowledge of basic information. Simple understanding Few links; limited detail; uses a limited range of specialist terms Level 2 (Clear) 3-4 marks Some development of points showing clear understanding of management. A place needs to be named for L2, although this might not be linked to specific management points, e.g. “park and ride systems will keep vehicles out of narrow streets and reduce congestion problems and problems with tourists parking in the way of local people”, “in Blackpool the beach is cleaned every morning during the summer to make sure that there is no litter on it to put off visitors. Dogs are also banned from the beach.” Knowledge of accurate information. Clear understanding Answers have some linkages; occasional detail/examples; uses some specialist terms where appropriate Level 3 (Detailed) 5-6 marks Detailed answer with clear development of points showing good understanding of management strategies. Clear reference to a named place related to management, e.g. “In Hawkshead too much traffic on narrow streets caused problems including congestion, air pollution and a risk of accidents. To manage the problem a bypass was built around the town and the centre pedestrianised. This made it safer for people to walk in the centre. Local cars are allowed into the village if they have permits, but all tourist vehicles have to use the bypass which leads to a large pay and display car park.” Knowledge of accurate information with appropriate examples. Detailed understanding, supported by relevant evidence and examples. Well organised, demonstrating detailed linkages and the inter-relationships between factors Range of ideas in a logical form; uses a range of specialist terms where appropriate.


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